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Sudan, Geneina camp, Darfur. 28 February 2018.  A small soap business in Darfur brightens the future. Women in Geneina camp in Darfur get through hardship and displacement through creating small businesses to increase their limited incomes.  In the Photo: Hawa’s youngest children are all able to attend school thanks to the money she made making and selling handicrafts.  Fourteen years ago, Hawa Adam Al-Nour and her family fled their home in Sirba locality of West Darfur State. They sought refuge in a camp for displaced people on the outskirts of Geneina, West Darfur’s capital. They left everything they owned behind including farms and livestock seeking safety and food.  “We had a good life back then; we used to farm and planted sorghum, tomatoes, okra and other vegetables as well as raised animals. We were self-reliant! We used to produce enough food for ourselves and even have surplus to sell in the market for some extra money,” said Hawa; Arabic for Eve.  Hawa received life-changing support from agencies and NGOs during her many years in the camp. WFP provided women like Hawa with food assistance and food in return for training. Through the skills she learnt, Hawa started a soap business. She was making soap for her own use and for sale in the market.  Thanks to their mother’s skills and hard-work, last year one of Hawa’s daughters graduated from university in Khartoum and her sister will be following suit this year. Their siblings are also keen to complete their education to improve their lives and that of their parents. They all dream of a brighter future.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 15307.00 kb
 
Sudan, Geneina camp, Darfur. 28 February 2018.  A small soap business in Darfur brightens the future. Women in Geneina camp in Darfur get through hardship and displacement through creating small businesses to increase their limited incomes.  In the Photo: Hawa’s youngest children are all able to attend school thanks to the money she made making and selling handicrafts.  Fourteen years ago, Hawa Adam Al-Nour and her family fled their home in Sirba locality of West Darfur State. They sought refuge in a camp for displaced people on the outskirts of Geneina, West Darfur’s capital. They left everything they owned behind including farms and livestock seeking safety and food.  “We had a good life back then; we used to farm and planted sorghum, tomatoes, okra and other vegetables as well as raised animals. We were self-reliant! We used to produce enough food for ourselves and even have surplus to sell in the market for some extra money,” said Hawa; Arabic for Eve.  Hawa received life-changing support from agencies and NGOs during her many years in the camp. WFP provided women like Hawa with food assistance and food in return for training. Through the skills she learnt, Hawa started a soap business. She was making soap for her own use and for sale in the market.  Thanks to their mother’s skills and hard-work, last year one of Hawa’s daughters graduated from university in Khartoum and her sister will be following suit this year. Their siblings are also keen to complete their education to improve their lives and that of their parents. They all dream of a brighter future.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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5582 x 3721 px 47.26 x 31.50 cm 16962.00 kb
 
Sudan, Geneina camp, Darfur. 27 February 2018.  A small soap business in Darfur brightens the future. Women in Geneina camp in Darfur get through hardship and displacement through creating small businesses to increase their limited incomes.  In the Photo: The women in Geneina are taught to make soap which they then sell to earn money to cover the needs of their families.  Fourteen years ago, Hawa Adam Al-Nour and her family fled their home in Sirba locality of West Darfur State. They sought refuge in a camp for displaced people on the outskirts of Geneina, West Darfur’s capital. They left everything they owned behind including farms and livestock seeking safety and food.  “We had a good life back then; we used to farm and planted sorghum, tomatoes, okra and other vegetables as well as raised animals. We were self-reliant! We used to produce enough food for ourselves and even have surplus to sell in the market for some extra money,” said Hawa; Arabic for Eve.  Hawa received life-changing support from agencies and NGOs during her many years in the camp. WFP provided women like Hawa with food assistance and food in return for training. Through the skills she learnt, Hawa started a soap business. She was making soap for her own use and for sale in the market.  Thanks to their mother’s skills and hard-work, last year one of Hawa’s daughters graduated from university in Khartoum and her sister will be following suit this year. Their siblings are also keen to complete their education to improve their lives and that of their parents. They all dream of a brighter future.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 12998.00 kb
 
Sudan, Geneina camp, Darfur. 27 February 2018.  A small soap business in Darfur brightens the future. Women in Geneina camp in Darfur get through hardship and displacement through creating small businesses to increase their limited incomes.  In the Photo: Hawa (left) and her friends showing soap which they produced in the camp after receiving training under WFP Food for Assets activities.  Fourteen years ago, Hawa Adam Al-Nour and her family fled their home in Sirba locality of West Darfur State. They sought refuge in a camp for displaced people on the outskirts of Geneina, West Darfur’s capital. They left everything they owned behind including farms and livestock seeking safety and food.  “We had a good life back then; we used to farm and planted sorghum, tomatoes, okra and other vegetables as well as raised animals. We were self-reliant! We used to produce enough food for ourselves and even have surplus to sell in the market for some extra money,” said Hawa; Arabic for Eve.  Hawa received life-changing support from agencies and NGOs during her many years in the camp. WFP provided women like Hawa with food assistance and food in return for training. Through the skills she learnt, Hawa started a soap business. She was making soap for her own use and for sale in the market.  Thanks to their mother’s skills and hard-work, last year one of Hawa’s daughters graduated from university in Khartoum and her sister will be following suit this year. Their siblings are also keen to complete their education to improve their lives and that of their parents. They all dream of a brighter future.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 14548.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 2 December 2017.  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement both within the country and across the border into Bangladesh. Working with local and international partners, the World Food Programme (WFP) is providing assistance for people arriving in Bangladesh from Myanmar.    Upon arrival, people receive high-energy biscuits. Once settled, they receive fortnightly rations of rice, lentils and oil. WFP is especially concerned about the health of women and children arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move, and is providing nutritional support.  In the Photo: Sefayet Ullah and Karim Ullah going back to their tent after a long day working. They work digging soil to install new toilets for NGOs and are now able to buy fish and vegetables with the money they earn.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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6236 x 4157 px 52.80 x 35.20 cm 17481.00 kb
 
Jordan, Amman, 27 November 2017  Did you know that Jordan is one of the sunniest places on earth? With over 300 sunny days a year, harnessing that solar energy is an opportunity we couldn’t pass up.  Jordan is one of the driest, and most resource-poor countries in the world. This means the country primarily generates its electricity by burning expensive fossil fuels. Needless to say, this leaves a massive carbon footprint that could be curbed by relying on renewable energy sources.  Climate change affects rainfall, agriculture and food production, posing a direct threat to global food security and nutrition. Studies show that climate change could increase the risk of hunger and malnutrition by up to 20% by 2050. So, naturally, the world’s largest humanitarian organization fighting hunger worldwide is taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint wherever possible.  The first WFP office to make the full switch to solar energy is in Jordan. Totaling almost 100,000 square meters of sun-soaking surface area, the solar panels we installed will generate around 200 kW of power per hour. This same amount of energy if generated by burning fossil fuels, would emit about 23 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.  “Every month when I sign electricity bill checks for the office I feel like I am throwing away money that should be saved,” said environmentally-conscious WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, the man behind this initiative. “Getting this programme up and running is an amazing feeling because I don’t have to sign those checks anymore — that money can go toward helping people.”  Previously, WFP’s electricity bill was tallying up to an average of US$10,000 per month — but now with solar energy, powering the office behind the life-saving humanitarian workforce will be completely free. That’s an extra US$120,000 that can go toward feeding families in Jordan.  “We couldn’t have made this achievement without the tremendous support from our Country Director. He encouraged us to keep going even when we faced obstacles,” Issa added.  WFP has been operating in Jordan since 1964 and has since initiated a wide range of development projects and emergency food aid operations in close collaboration with the government, corporate partners, NGOs and local communities.  In the Photo: Meticulous installation of 760 solar panels took a few months, but it was well worth the effort.  Photo: WFP/Dina El-Kassaby
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 5116.00 kb
 
Jordan, Amman, 27 November 2017  Did you know that Jordan is one of the sunniest places on earth? With over 300 sunny days a year, harnessing that solar energy is an opportunity we couldn’t pass up.  Jordan is one of the driest, and most resource-poor countries in the world. This means the country primarily generates its electricity by burning expensive fossil fuels. Needless to say, this leaves a massive carbon footprint that could be curbed by relying on renewable energy sources.  Climate change affects rainfall, agriculture and food production, posing a direct threat to global food security and nutrition. Studies show that climate change could increase the risk of hunger and malnutrition by up to 20% by 2050. So, naturally, the world’s largest humanitarian organization fighting hunger worldwide is taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint wherever possible.  The first WFP office to make the full switch to solar energy is in Jordan. Totaling almost 100,000 square meters of sun-soaking surface area, the solar panels we installed will generate around 200 kW of power per hour. This same amount of energy if generated by burning fossil fuels, would emit about 23 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.  “Every month when I sign electricity bill checks for the office I feel like I am throwing away money that should be saved,” said environmentally-conscious WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, the man behind this initiative. “Getting this programme up and running is an amazing feeling because I don’t have to sign those checks anymore — that money can go toward helping people.”  Previously, WFP’s electricity bill was tallying up to an average of US$10,000 per month — but now with solar energy, powering the office behind the life-saving humanitarian workforce will be completely free. That’s an extra US$120,000 that can go toward feeding families in Jordan.  “We couldn’t have made this achievement without the tremendous support from our Country Director. He encouraged us to keep going even when we faced obstacles,” Issa added.  WFP has been operating in Jordan since 1964 and has since initiated a wide range of development projects and emergency food aid operations in close collaboration with the government, corporate partners, NGOs and local communities.  In the Photo: Meticulous installation of 760 solar panels took a few months, but it was well worth the effort.  Photo: WFP/Dina El-Kassaby
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 4864.00 kb
 
Jordan, Amman, 27 November 2017  Did you know that Jordan is one of the sunniest places on earth? With over 300 sunny days a year, harnessing that solar energy is an opportunity we couldn’t pass up.  Jordan is one of the driest, and most resource-poor countries in the world. This means the country primarily generates its electricity by burning expensive fossil fuels. Needless to say, this leaves a massive carbon footprint that could be curbed by relying on renewable energy sources.  Climate change affects rainfall, agriculture and food production, posing a direct threat to global food security and nutrition. Studies show that climate change could increase the risk of hunger and malnutrition by up to 20% by 2050. So, naturally, the world’s largest humanitarian organization fighting hunger worldwide is taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint wherever possible.  The first WFP office to make the full switch to solar energy is in Jordan. Totaling almost 100,000 square meters of sun-soaking surface area, the solar panels we installed will generate around 200 kW of power per hour. This same amount of energy if generated by burning fossil fuels, would emit about 23 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.  “Every month when I sign electricity bill checks for the office I feel like I am throwing away money that should be saved,” said environmentally-conscious WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, the man behind this initiative. “Getting this programme up and running is an amazing feeling because I don’t have to sign those checks anymore — that money can go toward helping people.”  Previously, WFP’s electricity bill was tallying up to an average of US$10,000 per month — but now with solar energy, powering the office behind the life-saving humanitarian workforce will be completely free. That’s an extra US$120,000 that can go toward feeding families in Jordan.  “We couldn’t have made this achievement without the tremendous support from our Country Director. He encouraged us to keep going even when we faced obstacles,” Issa added.  WFP has been operating in Jordan since 1964 and has since initiated a wide range of development projects and emergency food aid operations in close collaboration with the government, corporate partners, NGOs and local communities.  In the Photo: WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, explains the cost and benefits of solar energy.  Photo: WFP/Dina El-Kassaby
JOR_20171127_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 6729.00 kb
 
Jordan, Amman, 27 November 2017  Did you know that Jordan is one of the sunniest places on earth? With over 300 sunny days a year, harnessing that solar energy is an opportunity we couldn’t pass up.  Jordan is one of the driest, and most resource-poor countries in the world. This means the country primarily generates its electricity by burning expensive fossil fuels. Needless to say, this leaves a massive carbon footprint that could be curbed by relying on renewable energy sources.  Climate change affects rainfall, agriculture and food production, posing a direct threat to global food security and nutrition. Studies show that climate change could increase the risk of hunger and malnutrition by up to 20% by 2050. So, naturally, the world’s largest humanitarian organization fighting hunger worldwide is taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint wherever possible.  The first WFP office to make the full switch to solar energy is in Jordan. Totaling almost 100,000 square meters of sun-soaking surface area, the solar panels we installed will generate around 200 kW of power per hour. This same amount of energy if generated by burning fossil fuels, would emit about 23 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.  “Every month when I sign electricity bill checks for the office I feel like I am throwing away money that should be saved,” said environmentally-conscious WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, the man behind this initiative. “Getting this programme up and running is an amazing feeling because I don’t have to sign those checks anymore — that money can go toward helping people.”  Previously, WFP’s electricity bill was tallying up to an average of US$10,000 per month — but now with solar energy, powering the office behind the life-saving humanitarian workforce will be completely free. That’s an extra US$120,000 that can go toward feeding families in Jordan.  “We couldn’t have made this achievement without the tremendous support from our Country Director. He encouraged us to keep going even when we faced obstacles,” Issa added.  WFP has been operating in Jordan since 1964 and has since initiated a wide range of development projects and emergency food aid operations in close collaboration with the government, corporate partners, NGOs and local communities.  In the Photo: Aerial view of sun-soaking solar panels with the dual purpose of serving as cover for the staff car park at WFP’s office in Amman.   Photo: WFP/Dina El-Kassaby
JOR_20171127_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 8332.00 kb
 
Jordan, Amman, 27 November 2017  Did you know that Jordan is one of the sunniest places on earth? With over 300 sunny days a year, harnessing that solar energy is an opportunity we couldn’t pass up.  Jordan is one of the driest, and most resource-poor countries in the world. This means the country primarily generates its electricity by burning expensive fossil fuels. Needless to say, this leaves a massive carbon footprint that could be curbed by relying on renewable energy sources.  Climate change affects rainfall, agriculture and food production, posing a direct threat to global food security and nutrition. Studies show that climate change could increase the risk of hunger and malnutrition by up to 20% by 2050. So, naturally, the world’s largest humanitarian organization fighting hunger worldwide is taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint wherever possible.  The first WFP office to make the full switch to solar energy is in Jordan. Totaling almost 100,000 square meters of sun-soaking surface area, the solar panels we installed will generate around 200 kW of power per hour. This same amount of energy if generated by burning fossil fuels, would emit about 23 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.  “Every month when I sign electricity bill checks for the office I feel like I am throwing away money that should be saved,” said environmentally-conscious WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, the man behind this initiative. “Getting this programme up and running is an amazing feeling because I don’t have to sign those checks anymore — that money can go toward helping people.”  Previously, WFP’s electricity bill was tallying up to an average of US$10,000 per month — but now with solar energy, powering the office behind the life-saving humanitarian workforce will be completely free. That’s an extra US$120,000 that can go toward feeding families in Jordan.  “We couldn’t have made this achievement without the tremendous support from our Country Director. He encouraged us to keep going even when we faced obstacles,” Issa added.  WFP has been operating in Jordan since 1964 and has since initiated a wide range of development projects and emergency food aid operations in close collaboration with the government, corporate partners, NGOs and local communities.  In the Photo: WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, explains the cost and benefits of solar energy.  Photo: WFP/Dina El-Kassaby
JOR_20171127_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 4146.00 kb
 
Jordan, Amman, 27 November 2017  Did you know that Jordan is one of the sunniest places on earth? With over 300 sunny days a year, harnessing that solar energy is an opportunity we couldn’t pass up.  Jordan is one of the driest, and most resource-poor countries in the world. This means the country primarily generates its electricity by burning expensive fossil fuels. Needless to say, this leaves a massive carbon footprint that could be curbed by relying on renewable energy sources.  Climate change affects rainfall, agriculture and food production, posing a direct threat to global food security and nutrition. Studies show that climate change could increase the risk of hunger and malnutrition by up to 20% by 2050. So, naturally, the world’s largest humanitarian organization fighting hunger worldwide is taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint wherever possible.  The first WFP office to make the full switch to solar energy is in Jordan. Totaling almost 100,000 square meters of sun-soaking surface area, the solar panels we installed will generate around 200 kW of power per hour. This same amount of energy if generated by burning fossil fuels, would emit about 23 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.  “Every month when I sign electricity bill checks for the office I feel like I am throwing away money that should be saved,” said environmentally-conscious WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, the man behind this initiative. “Getting this programme up and running is an amazing feeling because I don’t have to sign those checks anymore — that money can go toward helping people.”  Previously, WFP’s electricity bill was tallying up to an average of US$10,000 per month — but now with solar energy, powering the office behind the life-saving humanitarian workforce will be completely free. That’s an extra US$120,000 that can go toward feeding families in Jordan.  “We couldn’t have made this achievement without the tremendous support from our Country Director. He encouraged us to keep going even when we faced obstacles,” Issa added.  WFP has been operating in Jordan since 1964 and has since initiated a wide range of development projects and emergency food aid operations in close collaboration with the government, corporate partners, NGOs and local communities.  In the Photo: Aerial view of sun-soaking solar panels with the dual purpose of serving as cover for the staff car park at WFP’s office in Amman.   Photo: WFP/Dina El-Kassaby
JOR_20171127_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 7391.00 kb
 
Jordan, Amman, 27 November 2017  Did you know that Jordan is one of the sunniest places on earth? With over 300 sunny days a year, harnessing that solar energy is an opportunity we couldn’t pass up.  Jordan is one of the driest, and most resource-poor countries in the world. This means the country primarily generates its electricity by burning expensive fossil fuels. Needless to say, this leaves a massive carbon footprint that could be curbed by relying on renewable energy sources.  Climate change affects rainfall, agriculture and food production, posing a direct threat to global food security and nutrition. Studies show that climate change could increase the risk of hunger and malnutrition by up to 20% by 2050. So, naturally, the world’s largest humanitarian organization fighting hunger worldwide is taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint wherever possible.  The first WFP office to make the full switch to solar energy is in Jordan. Totaling almost 100,000 square meters of sun-soaking surface area, the solar panels we installed will generate around 200 kW of power per hour. This same amount of energy if generated by burning fossil fuels, would emit about 23 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.  “Every month when I sign electricity bill checks for the office I feel like I am throwing away money that should be saved,” said environmentally-conscious WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, the man behind this initiative. “Getting this programme up and running is an amazing feeling because I don’t have to sign those checks anymore — that money can go toward helping people.”  Previously, WFP’s electricity bill was tallying up to an average of US$10,000 per month — but now with solar energy, powering the office behind the life-saving humanitarian workforce will be completely free. That’s an extra US$120,000 that can go toward feeding families in Jordan.  “We couldn’t have made this achievement without the tremendous support from our Country Director. He encouraged us to keep going even when we faced obstacles,” Issa added.  WFP has been operating in Jordan since 1964 and has since initiated a wide range of development projects and emergency food aid operations in close collaboration with the government, corporate partners, NGOs and local communities.  In the Photo: Aerial view of sun-soaking solar panels with the dual purpose of serving as cover for the staff car park at WFP’s office in Amman.   Photo: WFP/Dina El-Kassaby
JOR_20171127_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 6189.00 kb
 
Jordan, Amman, 27 November 2017  Did you know that Jordan is one of the sunniest places on earth? With over 300 sunny days a year, harnessing that solar energy is an opportunity we couldn’t pass up.  Jordan is one of the driest, and most resource-poor countries in the world. This means the country primarily generates its electricity by burning expensive fossil fuels. Needless to say, this leaves a massive carbon footprint that could be curbed by relying on renewable energy sources.  Climate change affects rainfall, agriculture and food production, posing a direct threat to global food security and nutrition. Studies show that climate change could increase the risk of hunger and malnutrition by up to 20% by 2050. So, naturally, the world’s largest humanitarian organization fighting hunger worldwide is taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint wherever possible.  The first WFP office to make the full switch to solar energy is in Jordan. Totaling almost 100,000 square meters of sun-soaking surface area, the solar panels we installed will generate around 200 kW of power per hour. This same amount of energy if generated by burning fossil fuels, would emit about 23 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.  “Every month when I sign electricity bill checks for the office I feel like I am throwing away money that should be saved,” said environmentally-conscious WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, the man behind this initiative. “Getting this programme up and running is an amazing feeling because I don’t have to sign those checks anymore — that money can go toward helping people.”  Previously, WFP’s electricity bill was tallying up to an average of US$10,000 per month — but now with solar energy, powering the office behind the life-saving humanitarian workforce will be completely free. That’s an extra US$120,000 that can go toward feeding families in Jordan.  “We couldn’t have made this achievement without the tremendous support from our Country Director. He encouraged us to keep going even when we faced obstacles,” Issa added.  WFP has been operating in Jordan since 1964 and has since initiated a wide range of development projects and emergency food aid operations in close collaboration with the government, corporate partners, NGOs and local communities.  In the Photo: Aerial view of sun-soaking solar panels with the dual purpose of serving as cover for the staff car park at WFP’s office in Amman.   Photo: WFP/Dina El-Kassaby
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 5751.00 kb
 
South Sudan,  Gaireng, Ayod county, 01 October 2017  Even at the best of times, delivering aid in South Sudan is nothing short of a true feat. The current conflict, the result of a political rift between leaders and rival groups in 2013, has produced one of the worst humanitarian crisis of the modern era. Limited or no infrastructure, banditry, checkpoints set up by warring parties, general insecurity and a six-month rainy season are just some of the factors that make South Sudan one of the toughest places to deliver humanitarian aid.   In 2014, the World Food Programme (WFP) along with partners, pioneered an innovative initiative in which emergency mobile teams are able to reach people affected by conflict in remote, often isolated, areas with life-saving assistance.   How it works Known as the Integrated Rapid Response Mechanism (IRRM), the initiative plugs critical gaps in life-saving humanitarian assistance in South Sudan by enabling humanitarians to meet the needs of people who would otherwise be inaccessible. The key to the IRRM is that it responds to the rapidly changing environment on the ground. The “integrated” teams consist of staff from the United Nations World Food Programme, UNICEF, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and partner NGOs whose work is vital in seeing that food, nutrition and other critical supplies reach people in need — in time.   Rough camping in rough territory The teams usually travel by WFP-chartered helicopters and sleep in tents in camps in the middle of the bush. They register people in need and clear drop zones so that WFP can air-drop critical food, nutrition supplies and other urgently-needed items, from a fleet of Ilyushin-76 aircraft. In some places, they are supported by WFP logisticians moving supplies in by river or land. On average, a team works in one location for one week. But teams carry enough supplies to last them up to two weeks in case of emergencies. Life for teams is unpredictable. WFP Monitoring Assistant Sokri Edward Alison, an IRRM veteran, has lost count of the number of missions he has undertaken. But he remembers each time he had to extend his stay due to flight cancellations. “During the rainy season, one must always budget for an additional day or two,” he says with a broad smile. ‘Flights can be cancelled at short notice due to bad weather. That’s the way it is!”  Defeating famine His luggage reflects camping: a first aid kit, cans of purified water, purifying tablets in case water runs out, dried food, a flashlight, a lantern, a pair of gumboots, raincoat, fruit, insect repellent (the mosquitoes are tough), a sleeping mat, tent and an overdose of courage. You really need the latter! In 2017, IRRM teams faced their biggest test when famine was declared in Leer and Mayendit counties with a million people at risk. In response, WFP, FAO and UNICEF scaled-up operations, deploying 36 missions, adapting distribution cycles to provide more frequent relief and nutrition assistance and drawing on each other’s strength in the ensuing five-month response. The structure of the IRRM, which allows for an extremely fast and effective response, and its agility, probably its most potent weapon, contributed to defeating the emergency. By May, Leer and Mayendit were clear of famine, and an expected deterioration in Koch and Panyijar counties was prevented. “IRRM teams have contributed greatly to averting further starvation and loss of life. The teams have overseen the delivery of life-saving assistance to those without any other means to either receive, produce or buy their own food.” says Adnan Khan, WFP’s Country Director in South Sudan. “They have saved countless lives sometimes under conditions of insecurity.” There are many different risks. “Danger is always lurking around,” says Samuel Monday, a WFP Monitoring Assistant, recounting his encounters with snakes. “You are asleep in your tent and the watchman alerts you to the presence of a big snake.”   A magnet for people in need But the benefits are many. The IRRM allows people to receive more services simultaneously. WFP food distributions, which attract large numbers, act as triggers for wider life-saving interventions. FAO distributes rapid response kits so families weakened by conflict can start growing food and catching fish. UNICEF nutrition treatment and vaccination campaigns reach more people than before. In 2017, IRRM teams conducted 230 missions across South Sudan, reaching 800,000 people with 81,000 metric tons of food and nutritious products. The eight largest donors in 2017 to WFP’s operations in South Sudan were the United States, United Kingdom, European Union, Germany, Canada, Japan, Central Emergency Response Fund and the South Sudan Humanitarian Fund. In 2018, as hunger peaks between May and July just as the main rainy season descends on South Sudan, the IRRM, with sufficient donor support, will once again make a big difference for millions of the most vulnerable in the remotest places.  In the Photo: the A-Team: A WFP rapid response team wades through a swamp in Gaireng, Ayod county.  Photo: WFP/Charlie Musoka
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8510 x 5674 px 72.05 x 48.04 cm 8608.00 kb
 
South Sudan, 28 September 2017  Even at the best of times, delivering aid in South Sudan is nothing short of a true feat. The current conflict, the result of a political rift between leaders and rival groups in 2013, has produced one of the worst humanitarian crisis of the modern era. Limited or no infrastructure, banditry, checkpoints set up by warring parties, general insecurity and a six-month rainy season are just some of the factors that make South Sudan one of the toughest places to deliver humanitarian aid.   In 2014, the World Food Programme (WFP) along with partners, pioneered an innovative initiative in which emergency mobile teams are able to reach people affected by conflict in remote, often isolated, areas with life-saving assistance.   How it works Known as the Integrated Rapid Response Mechanism (IRRM), the initiative plugs critical gaps in life-saving humanitarian assistance in South Sudan by enabling humanitarians to meet the needs of people who would otherwise be inaccessible. The key to the IRRM is that it responds to the rapidly changing environment on the ground. The “integrated” teams consist of staff from the United Nations World Food Programme, UNICEF, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and partner NGOs whose work is vital in seeing that food, nutrition and other critical supplies reach people in need — in time.   Rough camping in rough territory The teams usually travel by WFP-chartered helicopters and sleep in tents in camps in the middle of the bush. They register people in need and clear drop zones so that WFP can air-drop critical food, nutrition supplies and other urgently-needed items, from a fleet of Ilyushin-76 aircraft. In some places, they are supported by WFP logisticians moving supplies in by river or land. On average, a team works in one location for one week. But teams carry enough supplies to last them up to two weeks in case of emergencies. Life for teams is unpredictable. WFP Monitoring Assistant Sokri Edward Alison, an IRRM veteran, has lost count of the number of missions he has undertaken. But he remembers each time he had to extend his stay due to flight cancellations. “During the rainy season, one must always budget for an additional day or two,” he says with a broad smile. ‘Flights can be cancelled at short notice due to bad weather. That’s the way it is!”  Defeating famine His luggage reflects camping: a first aid kit, cans of purified water, purifying tablets in case water runs out, dried food, a flashlight, a lantern, a pair of gumboots, raincoat, fruit, insect repellent (the mosquitoes are tough), a sleeping mat, tent and an overdose of courage. You really need the latter! In 2017, IRRM teams faced their biggest test when famine was declared in Leer and Mayendit counties with a million people at risk. In response, WFP, FAO and UNICEF scaled-up operations, deploying 36 missions, adapting distribution cycles to provide more frequent relief and nutrition assistance and drawing on each other’s strength in the ensuing five-month response. The structure of the IRRM, which allows for an extremely fast and effective response, and its agility, probably its most potent weapon, contributed to defeating the emergency. By May, Leer and Mayendit were clear of famine, and an expected deterioration in Koch and Panyijar counties was prevented. “IRRM teams have contributed greatly to averting further starvation and loss of life. The teams have overseen the delivery of life-saving assistance to those without any other means to either receive, produce or buy their own food.” says Adnan Khan, WFP’s Country Director in South Sudan. “They have saved countless lives sometimes under conditions of insecurity.” There are many different risks. “Danger is always lurking around,” says Samuel Monday, a WFP Monitoring Assistant, recounting his encounters with snakes. “You are asleep in your tent and the watchman alerts you to the presence of a big snake.”   A magnet for people in need But the benefits are many. The IRRM allows people to receive more services simultaneously. WFP food distributions, which attract large numbers, act as triggers for wider life-saving interventions. FAO distributes rapid response kits so families weakened by conflict can start growing food and catching fish. UNICEF nutrition treatment and vaccination campaigns reach more people than before. In 2017, IRRM teams conducted 230 missions across South Sudan, reaching 800,000 people with 81,000 metric tons of food and nutritious products. The eight largest donors in 2017 to WFP’s operations in South Sudan were the United States, United Kingdom, European Union, Germany, Canada, Japan, Central Emergency Response Fund and the South Sudan Humanitarian Fund. In 2018, as hunger peaks between May and July just as the main rainy season descends on South Sudan, the IRRM, with sufficient donor support, will once again make a big difference for millions of the most vulnerable in the remotest places.  In the Photo: Samuel Monday, a computer scientist-turned aid worker, gets ready to retire for the night after a tough day in the swamps.  Photo: WFP/Charlie Musoka
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02 Septermber, 2017, Hayelom, Tigray, Ethiopia.  WFP Hayelom Targetted Supplementary Feeding, TSF. The three UN agency heads are reveiving information about the WFP project From right to left: FAO Director-General José Graziano da Silva, WFP Executive Director David Beasley, and IGAD President Gilbert F. Houngbo. The heads of the three UN food agencies are visiting Ethiopia to highlight the critical food and nutrition security situation. Consecutive climate shocks have resulted in back-to-back droughts, which have caused hunger to soar and malnutrition rates to rise to alarming levels. The agency chiefs will discuss how best to strengthen their support to the Government and its systems so that Ethiopia can continue meeting its development goals while simultaneously addressing humanitarian challenges along the way.The UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)’s Director-General José Graziano da Silva, the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD)’s President Gilbert F. Houngbo and the World Food Programme (WFP)’s Executive Director David Beasley will be in Ethiopia from 1-4 September.In the worst-affected parts of the country, in the south and south-east, rains have failed for the third consecutive year. More than 8.5 million people require food assistance in the second half of 2017. The response led by the Government has begun to stabilize the situation, however additional efforts and support is urgently needed to prevent the situation deteriorating further.The agency heads will witness first-hand the scale of the crisis during a field mission to Somali region where the drought has killed many heads of livestock, causing a breakdown in pastoral livelihoods and a jump in malnutrition.The trio will meet drought-affected people who are receiving food rations, visit nutrition centres treating malnourished children and see distributions of essential support to keep the remaining livestock alive.The current food security and nutrition crisis cannot be resolved by emergency assistance alone. The longer-term solution lies in building communities’ resilience to better withstand shocks and avoid being plunged back into crisis. In Tigray region, the agency chiefs will see the dividends of investing in resilience. They will visit communities where the agencies’ complementary projects have boosted productivity, strengthened livelihoods and improved nutrition. In Addis Ababa, the three representatives will hold high-level discussions with Government representatives, and UN and other partner organizations, on the life-saving response and the need for greater collaboration and investment in resilience. Programme OverviewMonthly nutritional screening is conducted by health extension workers to identify malnourished children under five and pregnant and nursing women (PLWs). WFP allocates nutritious commodities based on the number of identified cases and distribution is done monthly. WFP is providing continuous support to the Regional Health Bureau through capacity building of health extension supervisors and health extension workers (HEWs) in the management of moderate acute malnutrition services at health facility/health post level.Programme ActivitiesThe project has been active for over ten years. Currently, there are 20 children and 49 PLWs that are moderately malnourished benefiting from the programme. At woreda level there are 354 children under five and 860 PLWs identified as moderately malnourished and benefiting from the programme. Main activities covered are:  Capacity building of health extension supervisors and health extension workers in the management of moderate acute malnutrition services at health facility/health post level; Regular nutrition screening of children 6-59 months and PLWs is conducted by the HEW at the health post; Provision/distribution of fortified supplementary foods for children under 5 and PLWs on a monthly basis by the women Food Distribution Agents (FDA’s).  Results/Impact  Improved health and nutritional status of children and pregnant and nursing women; Reduced rate of severely malnourished children  101 Out-patient Therapeutic Programme (OTP) discharges in 2016 compared to 14 in 2017 for the period January – July’2017 Children who are discharged from OTP are linked to TSF to avoid relapse  Build the capacity of the HEWs and technical staffs of the implementing partners through training and review meetingsImplementing/Cooperating Partners  The programme is implemented together with government sectors, Bureau of Health and Bureau of Agriculture and Rural Development-Early Warning Response and Food Security (EWRFS) and UN agencies - and UNICEF. Screening and targeting of the beneficiaries is conducted by the health sector (Health Extension Workers).  WFP also works in partnership with NGOs such as Concern World Wide International and World Vision – Ethiopia.  Photo: FAO/IFAD/WFP/Petterik Wiggers
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South Sudan, Mayendit county, 01 August 2017  Even at the best of times, delivering aid in South Sudan is nothing short of a true feat. The current conflict, the result of a political rift between leaders and rival groups in 2013, has produced one of the worst humanitarian crisis of the modern era. Limited or no infrastructure, banditry, checkpoints set up by warring parties, general insecurity and a six-month rainy season are just some of the factors that make South Sudan one of the toughest places to deliver humanitarian aid.   In 2014, the World Food Programme (WFP) along with partners, pioneered an innovative initiative in which emergency mobile teams are able to reach people affected by conflict in remote, often isolated, areas with life-saving assistance.   How it works Known as the Integrated Rapid Response Mechanism (IRRM), the initiative plugs critical gaps in life-saving humanitarian assistance in South Sudan by enabling humanitarians to meet the needs of people who would otherwise be inaccessible. The key to the IRRM is that it responds to the rapidly changing environment on the ground. The “integrated” teams consist of staff from the United Nations World Food Programme, UNICEF, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and partner NGOs whose work is vital in seeing that food, nutrition and other critical supplies reach people in need — in time.   Rough camping in rough territory The teams usually travel by WFP-chartered helicopters and sleep in tents in camps in the middle of the bush. They register people in need and clear drop zones so that WFP can air-drop critical food, nutrition supplies and other urgently-needed items, from a fleet of Ilyushin-76 aircraft. In some places, they are supported by WFP logisticians moving supplies in by river or land. On average, a team works in one location for one week. But teams carry enough supplies to last them up to two weeks in case of emergencies. Life for teams is unpredictable. WFP Monitoring Assistant Sokri Edward Alison, an IRRM veteran, has lost count of the number of missions he has undertaken. But he remembers each time he had to extend his stay due to flight cancellations. “During the rainy season, one must always budget for an additional day or two,” he says with a broad smile. ‘Flights can be cancelled at short notice due to bad weather. That’s the way it is!”  Defeating famine His luggage reflects camping: a first aid kit, cans of purified water, purifying tablets in case water runs out, dried food, a flashlight, a lantern, a pair of gumboots, raincoat, fruit, insect repellent (the mosquitoes are tough), a sleeping mat, tent and an overdose of courage. You really need the latter! In 2017, IRRM teams faced their biggest test when famine was declared in Leer and Mayendit counties with a million people at risk. In response, WFP, FAO and UNICEF scaled-up operations, deploying 36 missions, adapting distribution cycles to provide more frequent relief and nutrition assistance and drawing on each other’s strength in the ensuing five-month response. The structure of the IRRM, which allows for an extremely fast and effective response, and its agility, probably its most potent weapon, contributed to defeating the emergency. By May, Leer and Mayendit were clear of famine, and an expected deterioration in Koch and Panyijar counties was prevented. “IRRM teams have contributed greatly to averting further starvation and loss of life. The teams have overseen the delivery of life-saving assistance to those without any other means to either receive, produce or buy their own food.” says Adnan Khan, WFP’s Country Director in South Sudan. “They have saved countless lives sometimes under conditions of insecurity.” There are many different risks. “Danger is always lurking around,” says Samuel Monday, a WFP Monitoring Assistant, recounting his encounters with snakes. “You are asleep in your tent and the watchman alerts you to the presence of a big snake.”   A magnet for people in need But the benefits are many. The IRRM allows people to receive more services simultaneously. WFP food distributions, which attract large numbers, act as triggers for wider life-saving interventions. FAO distributes rapid response kits so families weakened by conflict can start growing food and catching fish. UNICEF nutrition treatment and vaccination campaigns reach more people than before. In 2017, IRRM teams conducted 230 missions across South Sudan, reaching 800,000 people with 81,000 metric tons of food and nutritious products. The eight largest donors in 2017 to WFP’s operations in South Sudan were the United States, United Kingdom, European Union, Germany, Canada, Japan, Central Emergency Response Fund and the South Sudan Humanitarian Fund. In 2018, as hunger peaks between May and July just as the main rainy season descends on South Sudan, the IRRM, with sufficient donor support, will once again make a big difference for millions of the most vulnerable in the remotest places.  In the Photo: Sokri Edward Alison, WFP Monitoring Assistant and a veteran of the IRRM, poses for the camera on a recent mission to Mayendit county  Photo: WFP/Charlie Musoka
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Yemen, Hodeidah, 26 July 2017  As the heads of three United Nations agencies – UNICEF, the World Food Programme (WFP) and the World Health Organisation (WHO) – we have travelled together to Yemen to see for ourselves the scale of this humanitarian crisis and to step up our combined efforts to help the people of Yemen.   This is the world’s worst cholera outbreak in the midst of the world’s largest humanitarian crisis. In the last three months alone, 400,000 cases of suspected cholera and nearly 1900 associated deaths have been recorded. Vital health, water and sanitation facilities have been crippled by more than two years of hostilities, and created the ideal conditions for diseases to spread.   The country is on the brink of famine, with over 60 per cent of the population not knowing where their next meal will come from. Nearly 2 million Yemeni children are acutely malnourished. Malnutrition makes them more susceptible to cholera; diseases create more malnutrition. A vicious combination.   At one hospital, we visited children who can barely gather the strength to breathe. We spoke with families overcome with sorrow for their ill loved ones and struggling to feed their families.   And, as we drove through the city, we saw how vital infrastructure, such as health and water facilities, have been damaged or destroyed.    Amid this chaos, some 16,000 community volunteers go house to house, providing families with information on how to protect themselves from diarrhea and cholera.  Doctors, nurses and other essential health staff are working around the clock to save lives.   More than 30,000 health workers haven’t been paid their salaries in more than 10 months, but many still report for duty. We have asked the Yemeni authorities to pay these health workers urgently because, without them, we fear that people who would otherwise have survived may die. As for our agencies, we will do our best to support these extremely dedicated health workers with incentives and stipends.   We also saw the vital work being done by local authorities and NGOs, supported by international humanitarian agencies, including our own. We have set up more than 1000 diarrhoea treatment centres and oral rehydration corners. The delivery of food supplements, intravenous fluids and other medical supplies, including ambulances, is ongoing, as is the rebuilding of critical infrastructure – the rehabilitation of hospitals, district health centres and the water and sanitation network. We are working with the World Bank in an innovative partnership that responds to needs on the ground and helps maintain the local health institutions.    But there is hope. More than 99 per cent of people who are sick with suspected cholera and who can access health services are now surviving. And the total number of children who will be afflicted with severe acute malnutrition this year is estimated at 385,000.   However, the situation remains dire. Thousands are falling sick every day. Sustained efforts are required to stop the spread of disease. Nearly 80 percent of Yemen’s children need immediate humanitarian assistance.   When we met with Yemeni leaders -- in Aden and in Sana’a -- we called on them to give humanitarian workers access to areas affected by fighting. And we urged them – more than anything – to find a peaceful political solution to the conflict. The Yemeni crisis requires an unprecedented response. Our three agencies have teamed up with the Yemeni authorities and other partners to coordinate our activities in new ways of working to save lives and to prepare for future emergencies. We now call on the international community to redouble its support for the people of Yemen. If we fail to do so, the catastrophe we have seen unfolding before our eyes will not only continue to claim lives but will scar future generations and the country for years to come.  In the Photo: WFP Country Director Stephen Anderson (right) and WFP Video Producer Marco Frattini (left) visiting the WFP chartered vessel MV Aec Diligence carrying a bulk of 26,000 MT of US inkind wheat. This ship has come to the Hodeidah port from Kalama port in Washington State/US to support the people of Yemen. The wheat will be milled in Yemen and it will be enough to provide wheat flour for 2 million people for one month. Significant delays continue to affect vessels entering all major ports due to damaged infrastructure, reduced operational capacities and insecurity.  Photo: WFP/Photolibrary
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Yemen, Hodeidah, 26 July 2017  As the heads of three United Nations agencies – UNICEF, the World Food Programme (WFP) and the World Health Organisation (WHO) – we have travelled together to Yemen to see for ourselves the scale of this humanitarian crisis and to step up our combined efforts to help the people of Yemen.   This is the world’s worst cholera outbreak in the midst of the world’s largest humanitarian crisis. In the last three months alone, 400,000 cases of suspected cholera and nearly 1900 associated deaths have been recorded. Vital health, water and sanitation facilities have been crippled by more than two years of hostilities, and created the ideal conditions for diseases to spread.   The country is on the brink of famine, with over 60 per cent of the population not knowing where their next meal will come from. Nearly 2 million Yemeni children are acutely malnourished. Malnutrition makes them more susceptible to cholera; diseases create more malnutrition. A vicious combination.   At one hospital, we visited children who can barely gather the strength to breathe. We spoke with families overcome with sorrow for their ill loved ones and struggling to feed their families.   And, as we drove through the city, we saw how vital infrastructure, such as health and water facilities, have been damaged or destroyed.    Amid this chaos, some 16,000 community volunteers go house to house, providing families with information on how to protect themselves from diarrhea and cholera.  Doctors, nurses and other essential health staff are working around the clock to save lives.   More than 30,000 health workers haven’t been paid their salaries in more than 10 months, but many still report for duty. We have asked the Yemeni authorities to pay these health workers urgently because, without them, we fear that people who would otherwise have survived may die. As for our agencies, we will do our best to support these extremely dedicated health workers with incentives and stipends.   We also saw the vital work being done by local authorities and NGOs, supported by international humanitarian agencies, including our own. We have set up more than 1000 diarrhoea treatment centres and oral rehydration corners. The delivery of food supplements, intravenous fluids and other medical supplies, including ambulances, is ongoing, as is the rebuilding of critical infrastructure – the rehabilitation of hospitals, district health centres and the water and sanitation network. We are working with the World Bank in an innovative partnership that responds to needs on the ground and helps maintain the local health institutions.    But there is hope. More than 99 per cent of people who are sick with suspected cholera and who can access health services are now surviving. And the total number of children who will be afflicted with severe acute malnutrition this year is estimated at 385,000.   However, the situation remains dire. Thousands are falling sick every day. Sustained efforts are required to stop the spread of disease. Nearly 80 percent of Yemen’s children need immediate humanitarian assistance.   When we met with Yemeni leaders -- in Aden and in Sana’a -- we called on them to give humanitarian workers access to areas affected by fighting. And we urged them – more than anything – to find a peaceful political solution to the conflict. The Yemeni crisis requires an unprecedented response. Our three agencies have teamed up with the Yemeni authorities and other partners to coordinate our activities in new ways of working to save lives and to prepare for future emergencies. We now call on the international community to redouble its support for the people of Yemen. If we fail to do so, the catastrophe we have seen unfolding before our eyes will not only continue to claim lives but will scar future generations and the country for years to come.  In the Photo: WFP’s Executive Director, David Beasley standing at the center) poses for a group shot with WFP staff in Hodeidah, Yemen.  Photo: WFP/Marco Frattini
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Yemen, Hodeidah, 26 July 2017  As the heads of three United Nations agencies – UNICEF, the World Food Programme (WFP) and the World Health Organisation (WHO) – we have travelled together to Yemen to see for ourselves the scale of this humanitarian crisis and to step up our combined efforts to help the people of Yemen.   This is the world’s worst cholera outbreak in the midst of the world’s largest humanitarian crisis. In the last three months alone, 400,000 cases of suspected cholera and nearly 1900 associated deaths have been recorded. Vital health, water and sanitation facilities have been crippled by more than two years of hostilities, and created the ideal conditions for diseases to spread.   The country is on the brink of famine, with over 60 per cent of the population not knowing where their next meal will come from. Nearly 2 million Yemeni children are acutely malnourished. Malnutrition makes them more susceptible to cholera; diseases create more malnutrition. A vicious combination.   At one hospital, we visited children who can barely gather the strength to breathe. We spoke with families overcome with sorrow for their ill loved ones and struggling to feed their families.   And, as we drove through the city, we saw how vital infrastructure, such as health and water facilities, have been damaged or destroyed.    Amid this chaos, some 16,000 community volunteers go house to house, providing families with information on how to protect themselves from diarrhea and cholera.  Doctors, nurses and other essential health staff are working around the clock to save lives.   More than 30,000 health workers haven’t been paid their salaries in more than 10 months, but many still report for duty. We have asked the Yemeni authorities to pay these health workers urgently because, without them, we fear that people who would otherwise have survived may die. As for our agencies, we will do our best to support these extremely dedicated health workers with incentives and stipends.   We also saw the vital work being done by local authorities and NGOs, supported by international humanitarian agencies, including our own. We have set up more than 1000 diarrhoea treatment centres and oral rehydration corners. The delivery of food supplements, intravenous fluids and other medical supplies, including ambulances, is ongoing, as is the rebuilding of critical infrastructure – the rehabilitation of hospitals, district health centres and the water and sanitation network. We are working with the World Bank in an innovative partnership that responds to needs on the ground and helps maintain the local health institutions.    But there is hope. More than 99 per cent of people who are sick with suspected cholera and who can access health services are now surviving. And the total number of children who will be afflicted with severe acute malnutrition this year is estimated at 385,000.   However, the situation remains dire. Thousands are falling sick every day. Sustained efforts are required to stop the spread of disease. Nearly 80 percent of Yemen’s children need immediate humanitarian assistance.   When we met with Yemeni leaders -- in Aden and in Sana’a -- we called on them to give humanitarian workers access to areas affected by fighting. And we urged them – more than anything – to find a peaceful political solution to the conflict. The Yemeni crisis requires an unprecedented response. Our three agencies have teamed up with the Yemeni authorities and other partners to coordinate our activities in new ways of working to save lives and to prepare for future emergencies. We now call on the international community to redouble its support for the people of Yemen. If we fail to do so, the catastrophe we have seen unfolding before our eyes will not only continue to claim lives but will scar future generations and the country for years to come.  In the Photo: WFP Country Director Stephen Anderson visiting the WFP chartered vessel MV Aec Diligence carrying a bulk of 26,000 MT of US inkind wheat. This ship has come to the Hodeidah port from Kalama port in Washington State/US to support the people of Yemen. The wheat will be milled in Yemen and it will be enough to provide wheat flour for 2 million people for one month. Significant delays continue to affect vessels entering all major ports due to damaged infrastructure, reduced operational capacities and insecurity.  Photo: WFP/Marco Frattini
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Yemen, Hodeidah, 26 July 2017  As the heads of three United Nations agencies – UNICEF, the World Food Programme (WFP) and the World Health Organisation (WHO) – we have travelled together to Yemen to see for ourselves the scale of this humanitarian crisis and to step up our combined efforts to help the people of Yemen.   This is the world’s worst cholera outbreak in the midst of the world’s largest humanitarian crisis. In the last three months alone, 400,000 cases of suspected cholera and nearly 1900 associated deaths have been recorded. Vital health, water and sanitation facilities have been crippled by more than two years of hostilities, and created the ideal conditions for diseases to spread.   The country is on the brink of famine, with over 60 per cent of the population not knowing where their next meal will come from. Nearly 2 million Yemeni children are acutely malnourished. Malnutrition makes them more susceptible to cholera; diseases create more malnutrition. A vicious combination.   At one hospital, we visited children who can barely gather the strength to breathe. We spoke with families overcome with sorrow for their ill loved ones and struggling to feed their families.   And, as we drove through the city, we saw how vital infrastructure, such as health and water facilities, have been damaged or destroyed.    Amid this chaos, some 16,000 community volunteers go house to house, providing families with information on how to protect themselves from diarrhea and cholera.  Doctors, nurses and other essential health staff are working around the clock to save lives.   More than 30,000 health workers haven’t been paid their salaries in more than 10 months, but many still report for duty. We have asked the Yemeni authorities to pay these health workers urgently because, without them, we fear that people who would otherwise have survived may die. As for our agencies, we will do our best to support these extremely dedicated health workers with incentives and stipends.   We also saw the vital work being done by local authorities and NGOs, supported by international humanitarian agencies, including our own. We have set up more than 1000 diarrhoea treatment centres and oral rehydration corners. The delivery of food supplements, intravenous fluids and other medical supplies, including ambulances, is ongoing, as is the rebuilding of critical infrastructure – the rehabilitation of hospitals, district health centres and the water and sanitation network. We are working with the World Bank in an innovative partnership that responds to needs on the ground and helps maintain the local health institutions.    But there is hope. More than 99 per cent of people who are sick with suspected cholera and who can access health services are now surviving. And the total number of children who will be afflicted with severe acute malnutrition this year is estimated at 385,000.   However, the situation remains dire. Thousands are falling sick every day. Sustained efforts are required to stop the spread of disease. Nearly 80 percent of Yemen’s children need immediate humanitarian assistance.   When we met with Yemeni leaders -- in Aden and in Sana’a -- we called on them to give humanitarian workers access to areas affected by fighting. And we urged them – more than anything – to find a peaceful political solution to the conflict. The Yemeni crisis requires an unprecedented response. Our three agencies have teamed up with the Yemeni authorities and other partners to coordinate our activities in new ways of working to save lives and to prepare for future emergencies. We now call on the international community to redouble its support for the people of Yemen. If we fail to do so, the catastrophe we have seen unfolding before our eyes will not only continue to claim lives but will scar future generations and the country for years to come.  In the Photo: the WFP chartered vessel MV Aec Diligence carrying a bulk of 26,000 MT of US inkind wheat. This ship has come to the Hodeidah port from Kalama port in Washington State/US to support the people of Yemen. The wheat will be milled in Yemen and it will be enough to provide wheat flour for 2 million people for one month. Significant delays continue to affect vessels entering all major ports due to damaged infrastructure, reduced operational capacities and insecurity.  Photo: WFP/Marco Frattini
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Yemen, Hodeidah, 26 July 2017  As the heads of three United Nations agencies – UNICEF, the World Food Programme (WFP) and the World Health Organisation (WHO) – we have travelled together to Yemen to see for ourselves the scale of this humanitarian crisis and to step up our combined efforts to help the people of Yemen.   This is the world’s worst cholera outbreak in the midst of the world’s largest humanitarian crisis. In the last three months alone, 400,000 cases of suspected cholera and nearly 1900 associated deaths have been recorded. Vital health, water and sanitation facilities have been crippled by more than two years of hostilities, and created the ideal conditions for diseases to spread.   The country is on the brink of famine, with over 60 per cent of the population not knowing where their next meal will come from. Nearly 2 million Yemeni children are acutely malnourished. Malnutrition makes them more susceptible to cholera; diseases create more malnutrition. A vicious combination.   At one hospital, we visited children who can barely gather the strength to breathe. We spoke with families overcome with sorrow for their ill loved ones and struggling to feed their families.   And, as we drove through the city, we saw how vital infrastructure, such as health and water facilities, have been damaged or destroyed.    Amid this chaos, some 16,000 community volunteers go house to house, providing families with information on how to protect themselves from diarrhea and cholera.  Doctors, nurses and other essential health staff are working around the clock to save lives.   More than 30,000 health workers haven’t been paid their salaries in more than 10 months, but many still report for duty. We have asked the Yemeni authorities to pay these health workers urgently because, without them, we fear that people who would otherwise have survived may die. As for our agencies, we will do our best to support these extremely dedicated health workers with incentives and stipends.   We also saw the vital work being done by local authorities and NGOs, supported by international humanitarian agencies, including our own. We have set up more than 1000 diarrhoea treatment centres and oral rehydration corners. The delivery of food supplements, intravenous fluids and other medical supplies, including ambulances, is ongoing, as is the rebuilding of critical infrastructure – the rehabilitation of hospitals, district health centres and the water and sanitation network. We are working with the World Bank in an innovative partnership that responds to needs on the ground and helps maintain the local health institutions.    But there is hope. More than 99 per cent of people who are sick with suspected cholera and who can access health services are now surviving. And the total number of children who will be afflicted with severe acute malnutrition this year is estimated at 385,000.   However, the situation remains dire. Thousands are falling sick every day. Sustained efforts are required to stop the spread of disease. Nearly 80 percent of Yemen’s children need immediate humanitarian assistance.   When we met with Yemeni leaders -- in Aden and in Sana’a -- we called on them to give humanitarian workers access to areas affected by fighting. And we urged them – more than anything – to find a peaceful political solution to the conflict. The Yemeni crisis requires an unprecedented response. Our three agencies have teamed up with the Yemeni authorities and other partners to coordinate our activities in new ways of working to save lives and to prepare for future emergencies. We now call on the international community to redouble its support for the people of Yemen. If we fail to do so, the catastrophe we have seen unfolding before our eyes will not only continue to claim lives but will scar future generations and the country for years to come.  In the Photo: WFP Country Director Stephen Anderson (1st right) and WFP’s Executive Director, David Beasley (2nd right) and  are visiting the WFP chartered vessel MV Aec Diligence carrying a bulk of 26,000 MT of US inkind wheat. This ship has come to the Hodeidah port from Kalama port in Washington State/US to support the people of Yemen. The wheat will be milled in Yemen and it will be enough to provide wheat flour for 2 million people for one month. Significant delays continue to affect vessels entering all major ports due to damaged infrastructure, reduced operational capacities and insecurity.  Photo: WFP/Marco Frattini
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Yemen, Hodeidah, 26 July 2017  As the heads of three United Nations agencies – UNICEF, the World Food Programme (WFP) and the World Health Organisation (WHO) – we have travelled together to Yemen to see for ourselves the scale of this humanitarian crisis and to step up our combined efforts to help the people of Yemen.   This is the world’s worst cholera outbreak in the midst of the world’s largest humanitarian crisis. In the last three months alone, 400,000 cases of suspected cholera and nearly 1900 associated deaths have been recorded. Vital health, water and sanitation facilities have been crippled by more than two years of hostilities, and created the ideal conditions for diseases to spread.   The country is on the brink of famine, with over 60 per cent of the population not knowing where their next meal will come from. Nearly 2 million Yemeni children are acutely malnourished. Malnutrition makes them more susceptible to cholera; diseases create more malnutrition. A vicious combination.   At one hospital, we visited children who can barely gather the strength to breathe. We spoke with families overcome with sorrow for their ill loved ones and struggling to feed their families.   And, as we drove through the city, we saw how vital infrastructure, such as health and water facilities, have been damaged or destroyed.    Amid this chaos, some 16,000 community volunteers go house to house, providing families with information on how to protect themselves from diarrhea and cholera.  Doctors, nurses and other essential health staff are working around the clock to save lives.   More than 30,000 health workers haven’t been paid their salaries in more than 10 months, but many still report for duty. We have asked the Yemeni authorities to pay these health workers urgently because, without them, we fear that people who would otherwise have survived may die. As for our agencies, we will do our best to support these extremely dedicated health workers with incentives and stipends.   We also saw the vital work being done by local authorities and NGOs, supported by international humanitarian agencies, including our own. We have set up more than 1000 diarrhoea treatment centres and oral rehydration corners. The delivery of food supplements, intravenous fluids and other medical supplies, including ambulances, is ongoing, as is the rebuilding of critical infrastructure – the rehabilitation of hospitals, district health centres and the water and sanitation network. We are working with the World Bank in an innovative partnership that responds to needs on the ground and helps maintain the local health institutions.    But there is hope. More than 99 per cent of people who are sick with suspected cholera and who can access health services are now surviving. And the total number of children who will be afflicted with severe acute malnutrition this year is estimated at 385,000.   However, the situation remains dire. Thousands are falling sick every day. Sustained efforts are required to stop the spread of disease. Nearly 80 percent of Yemen’s children need immediate humanitarian assistance.   When we met with Yemeni leaders -- in Aden and in Sana’a -- we called on them to give humanitarian workers access to areas affected by fighting. And we urged them – more than anything – to find a peaceful political solution to the conflict. The Yemeni crisis requires an unprecedented response. Our three agencies have teamed up with the Yemeni authorities and other partners to coordinate our activities in new ways of working to save lives and to prepare for future emergencies. We now call on the international community to redouble its support for the people of Yemen. If we fail to do so, the catastrophe we have seen unfolding before our eyes will not only continue to claim lives but will scar future generations and the country for years to come.  In the Photo: WFP’s Executive Director, David Beasley (left) and WFP Country Director Stephen Anderson (right) are visiting the WFP chartered vessel MV Aec Diligence carrying a bulk of 26,000 MT of US inkind wheat. This ship has come to the Hodeidah port from Kalama port in Washington State/US to support the people of Yemen. The wheat will be milled in Yemen and it will be enough to provide wheat flour for 2 million people for one month. Significant delays continue to affect vessels entering all major ports due to damaged infrastructure, reduced operational capacities and insecurity.  Photo: WFP/Marco Frattini
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Yemen, Hodeidah, 26 July 2017  As the heads of three United Nations agencies – UNICEF, the World Food Programme (WFP) and the World Health Organisation (WHO) – we have travelled together to Yemen to see for ourselves the scale of this humanitarian crisis and to step up our combined efforts to help the people of Yemen.   This is the world’s worst cholera outbreak in the midst of the world’s largest humanitarian crisis. In the last three months alone, 400,000 cases of suspected cholera and nearly 1900 associated deaths have been recorded. Vital health, water and sanitation facilities have been crippled by more than two years of hostilities, and created the ideal conditions for diseases to spread.   The country is on the brink of famine, with over 60 per cent of the population not knowing where their next meal will come from. Nearly 2 million Yemeni children are acutely malnourished. Malnutrition makes them more susceptible to cholera; diseases create more malnutrition. A vicious combination.   At one hospital, we visited children who can barely gather the strength to breathe. We spoke with families overcome with sorrow for their ill loved ones and struggling to feed their families.   And, as we drove through the city, we saw how vital infrastructure, such as health and water facilities, have been damaged or destroyed.    Amid this chaos, some 16,000 community volunteers go house to house, providing families with information on how to protect themselves from diarrhea and cholera.  Doctors, nurses and other essential health staff are working around the clock to save lives.   More than 30,000 health workers haven’t been paid their salaries in more than 10 months, but many still report for duty. We have asked the Yemeni authorities to pay these health workers urgently because, without them, we fear that people who would otherwise have survived may die. As for our agencies, we will do our best to support these extremely dedicated health workers with incentives and stipends.   We also saw the vital work being done by local authorities and NGOs, supported by international humanitarian agencies, including our own. We have set up more than 1000 diarrhoea treatment centres and oral rehydration corners. The delivery of food supplements, intravenous fluids and other medical supplies, including ambulances, is ongoing, as is the rebuilding of critical infrastructure – the rehabilitation of hospitals, district health centres and the water and sanitation network. We are working with the World Bank in an innovative partnership that responds to needs on the ground and helps maintain the local health institutions.    But there is hope. More than 99 per cent of people who are sick with suspected cholera and who can access health services are now surviving. And the total number of children who will be afflicted with severe acute malnutrition this year is estimated at 385,000.   However, the situation remains dire. Thousands are falling sick every day. Sustained efforts are required to stop the spread of disease. Nearly 80 percent of Yemen’s children need immediate humanitarian assistance.   When we met with Yemeni leaders -- in Aden and in Sana’a -- we called on them to give humanitarian workers access to areas affected by fighting. And we urged them – more than anything – to find a peaceful political solution to the conflict. The Yemeni crisis requires an unprecedented response. Our three agencies have teamed up with the Yemeni authorities and other partners to coordinate our activities in new ways of working to save lives and to prepare for future emergencies. We now call on the international community to redouble its support for the people of Yemen. If we fail to do so, the catastrophe we have seen unfolding before our eyes will not only continue to claim lives but will scar future generations and the country for years to come.  In the Photo: WFP’s Executive Director, David Beasley visiting the WFP chartered vessel MV Aec Diligence carrying a bulk of 26,000 MT of US inkind wheat. This ship has come to the Hodeidah port from Kalama port in Washington State/US to support the people of Yemen. The wheat will be milled in Yemen and it will be enough to provide wheat flour for 2 million people for one month. Significant delays continue to affect vessels entering all major ports due to damaged infrastructure, reduced operational capacities and insecurity.  Photo: WFP/Marco Frattini
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 5275.00 kb
 
Yemen, Hodeidah, 26 July 2017  As the heads of three United Nations agencies – UNICEF, the World Food Programme (WFP) and the World Health Organisation (WHO) – we have travelled together to Yemen to see for ourselves the scale of this humanitarian crisis and to step up our combined efforts to help the people of Yemen.   This is the world’s worst cholera outbreak in the midst of the world’s largest humanitarian crisis. In the last three months alone, 400,000 cases of suspected cholera and nearly 1900 associated deaths have been recorded. Vital health, water and sanitation facilities have been crippled by more than two years of hostilities, and created the ideal conditions for diseases to spread.   The country is on the brink of famine, with over 60 per cent of the population not knowing where their next meal will come from. Nearly 2 million Yemeni children are acutely malnourished. Malnutrition makes them more susceptible to cholera; diseases create more malnutrition. A vicious combination.   At one hospital, we visited children who can barely gather the strength to breathe. We spoke with families overcome with sorrow for their ill loved ones and struggling to feed their families.   And, as we drove through the city, we saw how vital infrastructure, such as health and water facilities, have been damaged or destroyed.    Amid this chaos, some 16,000 community volunteers go house to house, providing families with information on how to protect themselves from diarrhea and cholera.  Doctors, nurses and other essential health staff are working around the clock to save lives.   More than 30,000 health workers haven’t been paid their salaries in more than 10 months, but many still report for duty. We have asked the Yemeni authorities to pay these health workers urgently because, without them, we fear that people who would otherwise have survived may die. As for our agencies, we will do our best to support these extremely dedicated health workers with incentives and stipends.   We also saw the vital work being done by local authorities and NGOs, supported by international humanitarian agencies, including our own. We have set up more than 1000 diarrhoea treatment centres and oral rehydration corners. The delivery of food supplements, intravenous fluids and other medical supplies, including ambulances, is ongoing, as is the rebuilding of critical infrastructure – the rehabilitation of hospitals, district health centres and the water and sanitation network. We are working with the World Bank in an innovative partnership that responds to needs on the ground and helps maintain the local health institutions.    But there is hope. More than 99 per cent of people who are sick with suspected cholera and who can access health services are now surviving. And the total number of children who will be afflicted with severe acute malnutrition this year is estimated at 385,000.   However, the situation remains dire. Thousands are falling sick every day. Sustained efforts are required to stop the spread of disease. Nearly 80 percent of Yemen’s children need immediate humanitarian assistance.   When we met with Yemeni leaders -- in Aden and in Sana’a -- we called on them to give humanitarian workers access to areas affected by fighting. And we urged them – more than anything – to find a peaceful political solution to the conflict. The Yemeni crisis requires an unprecedented response. Our three agencies have teamed up with the Yemeni authorities and other partners to coordinate our activities in new ways of working to save lives and to prepare for future emergencies. We now call on the international community to redouble its support for the people of Yemen. If we fail to do so, the catastrophe we have seen unfolding before our eyes will not only continue to claim lives but will scar future generations and the country for years to come.  In the Photo: a view of the Hodeidah port.  Photo: WFP/Marco Frattini
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