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Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Biroko, 26 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Jean Ben Lambo
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 6601.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Biroko, 26 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Jean Ben Lambo
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800 x 533 px 6.77 x 4.51 cm 232.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Biroko, 26 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Jean Ben Lambo
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 6874.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Biroko, 26 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Jean Ben Lambo
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820 x 546 px 6.94 x 4.62 cm 210.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Biroko, 26 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Jean Ben Lambo
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1000 x 666 px 8.47 x 5.64 cm 381.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Biroko, 26 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Jean Ben Lambo
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1000 x 666 px 8.47 x 5.64 cm 282.00 kb
 
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Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Biroko, 06 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Gustave Mwamba
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4608 x 2592 px 162.56 x 91.44 cm 7059.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Wangata Health Zone in Mbandaka, 05 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Olivier Nkakudulu
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612 x 816 px 21.59 x 28.79 cm 241.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Wangata Health Zone in Mbandaka, 05 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Olivier Nkakudulu
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1024 x 768 px 36.12 x 27.09 cm 99.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Wangata Health Zone in Mbandaka, 05 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Olivier Nkakudulu
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1024 x 768 px 36.12 x 27.09 cm 92.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Wangata Health Zone in Mbandaka, 05 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Olivier Nkakudulu
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612 x 816 px 16.19 x 21.59 cm 228.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Wangata Health Zone in Mbandaka, 12 May 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Olivier Nkakudulu
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1920 x 1080 px 27.09 x 15.24 cm 1064.00 kb
 
Somalia, Mogadishu, Aden Adde International airport, 06 May 2018  WFP staff loads SCOPE tools to helicopter at Aden Adde International airport in Mogadishu Somalia, on Sunday 06 May 2018. WFP’s Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) transported 3,617 passengers and 23 mt of cargo to 19 locations inside Somalia, serving 106 UN, diplomatic and media agencies as well as non-governmental organisations (NGOs).  Photo: WFP/Ismail Taxta
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5032 x 3104 px 177.52 x 109.50 cm 2392.00 kb
 
Somalia, Mogadishu, Aden Adde International airport, 06 May 2018  WFP staff loads SCOPE tools to helicopter at Aden Adde International airport in Mogadishu Somalia, on Sunday 06 May 2018. WFP’s Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) transported 3,617 passengers and 23 mt of cargo to 19 locations inside Somalia, serving 106 UN, diplomatic and media agencies as well as non-governmental organisations (NGOs).  Photo: WFP/Ismail Taxta
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5616 x 3744 px 198.12 x 132.08 cm 2427.00 kb
 
Sudan, Geneina camp, Darfur. 28 February 2018.  A small soap business in Darfur brightens the future. Women in Geneina camp in Darfur get through hardship and displacement through creating small businesses to increase their limited incomes.  In the Photo: Hawa’s youngest children are all able to attend school thanks to the money she made making and selling handicrafts.  Fourteen years ago, Hawa Adam Al-Nour and her family fled their home in Sirba locality of West Darfur State. They sought refuge in a camp for displaced people on the outskirts of Geneina, West Darfur’s capital. They left everything they owned behind including farms and livestock seeking safety and food.  “We had a good life back then; we used to farm and planted sorghum, tomatoes, okra and other vegetables as well as raised animals. We were self-reliant! We used to produce enough food for ourselves and even have surplus to sell in the market for some extra money,” said Hawa; Arabic for Eve.  Hawa received life-changing support from agencies and NGOs during her many years in the camp. WFP provided women like Hawa with food assistance and food in return for training. Through the skills she learnt, Hawa started a soap business. She was making soap for her own use and for sale in the market.  Thanks to their mother’s skills and hard-work, last year one of Hawa’s daughters graduated from university in Khartoum and her sister will be following suit this year. Their siblings are also keen to complete their education to improve their lives and that of their parents. They all dream of a brighter future.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 15307.00 kb
 
Sudan, Geneina camp, Darfur. 28 February 2018.  A small soap business in Darfur brightens the future. Women in Geneina camp in Darfur get through hardship and displacement through creating small businesses to increase their limited incomes.  In the Photo: Hawa’s youngest children are all able to attend school thanks to the money she made making and selling handicrafts.  Fourteen years ago, Hawa Adam Al-Nour and her family fled their home in Sirba locality of West Darfur State. They sought refuge in a camp for displaced people on the outskirts of Geneina, West Darfur’s capital. They left everything they owned behind including farms and livestock seeking safety and food.  “We had a good life back then; we used to farm and planted sorghum, tomatoes, okra and other vegetables as well as raised animals. We were self-reliant! We used to produce enough food for ourselves and even have surplus to sell in the market for some extra money,” said Hawa; Arabic for Eve.  Hawa received life-changing support from agencies and NGOs during her many years in the camp. WFP provided women like Hawa with food assistance and food in return for training. Through the skills she learnt, Hawa started a soap business. She was making soap for her own use and for sale in the market.  Thanks to their mother’s skills and hard-work, last year one of Hawa’s daughters graduated from university in Khartoum and her sister will be following suit this year. Their siblings are also keen to complete their education to improve their lives and that of their parents. They all dream of a brighter future.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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5582 x 3721 px 47.26 x 31.50 cm 16962.00 kb
 
Sudan, Geneina camp, Darfur. 27 February 2018.  A small soap business in Darfur brightens the future. Women in Geneina camp in Darfur get through hardship and displacement through creating small businesses to increase their limited incomes.  In the Photo: The women in Geneina are taught to make soap which they then sell to earn money to cover the needs of their families.  Fourteen years ago, Hawa Adam Al-Nour and her family fled their home in Sirba locality of West Darfur State. They sought refuge in a camp for displaced people on the outskirts of Geneina, West Darfur’s capital. They left everything they owned behind including farms and livestock seeking safety and food.  “We had a good life back then; we used to farm and planted sorghum, tomatoes, okra and other vegetables as well as raised animals. We were self-reliant! We used to produce enough food for ourselves and even have surplus to sell in the market for some extra money,” said Hawa; Arabic for Eve.  Hawa received life-changing support from agencies and NGOs during her many years in the camp. WFP provided women like Hawa with food assistance and food in return for training. Through the skills she learnt, Hawa started a soap business. She was making soap for her own use and for sale in the market.  Thanks to their mother’s skills and hard-work, last year one of Hawa’s daughters graduated from university in Khartoum and her sister will be following suit this year. Their siblings are also keen to complete their education to improve their lives and that of their parents. They all dream of a brighter future.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 12998.00 kb
 
Sudan, Geneina camp, Darfur. 27 February 2018.  A small soap business in Darfur brightens the future. Women in Geneina camp in Darfur get through hardship and displacement through creating small businesses to increase their limited incomes.  In the Photo: Hawa (left) and her friends showing soap which they produced in the camp after receiving training under WFP Food for Assets activities.  Fourteen years ago, Hawa Adam Al-Nour and her family fled their home in Sirba locality of West Darfur State. They sought refuge in a camp for displaced people on the outskirts of Geneina, West Darfur’s capital. They left everything they owned behind including farms and livestock seeking safety and food.  “We had a good life back then; we used to farm and planted sorghum, tomatoes, okra and other vegetables as well as raised animals. We were self-reliant! We used to produce enough food for ourselves and even have surplus to sell in the market for some extra money,” said Hawa; Arabic for Eve.  Hawa received life-changing support from agencies and NGOs during her many years in the camp. WFP provided women like Hawa with food assistance and food in return for training. Through the skills she learnt, Hawa started a soap business. She was making soap for her own use and for sale in the market.  Thanks to their mother’s skills and hard-work, last year one of Hawa’s daughters graduated from university in Khartoum and her sister will be following suit this year. Their siblings are also keen to complete their education to improve their lives and that of their parents. They all dream of a brighter future.  Photo: WFP/Ala Kheir
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 14548.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 2 December 2017.  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement both within the country and across the border into Bangladesh. Working with local and international partners, the World Food Programme (WFP) is providing assistance for people arriving in Bangladesh from Myanmar.    Upon arrival, people receive high-energy biscuits. Once settled, they receive fortnightly rations of rice, lentils and oil. WFP is especially concerned about the health of women and children arriving hungry and malnourished after days on the move, and is providing nutritional support.  In the Photo: Sefayet Ullah and Karim Ullah going back to their tent after a long day working. They work digging soil to install new toilets for NGOs and are now able to buy fish and vegetables with the money they earn.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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Jordan, Amman, 27 November 2017  Did you know that Jordan is one of the sunniest places on earth? With over 300 sunny days a year, harnessing that solar energy is an opportunity we couldn’t pass up.  Jordan is one of the driest, and most resource-poor countries in the world. This means the country primarily generates its electricity by burning expensive fossil fuels. Needless to say, this leaves a massive carbon footprint that could be curbed by relying on renewable energy sources.  Climate change affects rainfall, agriculture and food production, posing a direct threat to global food security and nutrition. Studies show that climate change could increase the risk of hunger and malnutrition by up to 20% by 2050. So, naturally, the world’s largest humanitarian organization fighting hunger worldwide is taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint wherever possible.  The first WFP office to make the full switch to solar energy is in Jordan. Totaling almost 100,000 square meters of sun-soaking surface area, the solar panels we installed will generate around 200 kW of power per hour. This same amount of energy if generated by burning fossil fuels, would emit about 23 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.  “Every month when I sign electricity bill checks for the office I feel like I am throwing away money that should be saved,” said environmentally-conscious WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, the man behind this initiative. “Getting this programme up and running is an amazing feeling because I don’t have to sign those checks anymore — that money can go toward helping people.”  Previously, WFP’s electricity bill was tallying up to an average of US$10,000 per month — but now with solar energy, powering the office behind the life-saving humanitarian workforce will be completely free. That’s an extra US$120,000 that can go toward feeding families in Jordan.  “We couldn’t have made this achievement without the tremendous support from our Country Director. He encouraged us to keep going even when we faced obstacles,” Issa added.  WFP has been operating in Jordan since 1964 and has since initiated a wide range of development projects and emergency food aid operations in close collaboration with the government, corporate partners, NGOs and local communities.  In the Photo: Meticulous installation of 760 solar panels took a few months, but it was well worth the effort.  Photo: WFP/Dina El-Kassaby
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Jordan, Amman, 27 November 2017  Did you know that Jordan is one of the sunniest places on earth? With over 300 sunny days a year, harnessing that solar energy is an opportunity we couldn’t pass up.  Jordan is one of the driest, and most resource-poor countries in the world. This means the country primarily generates its electricity by burning expensive fossil fuels. Needless to say, this leaves a massive carbon footprint that could be curbed by relying on renewable energy sources.  Climate change affects rainfall, agriculture and food production, posing a direct threat to global food security and nutrition. Studies show that climate change could increase the risk of hunger and malnutrition by up to 20% by 2050. So, naturally, the world’s largest humanitarian organization fighting hunger worldwide is taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint wherever possible.  The first WFP office to make the full switch to solar energy is in Jordan. Totaling almost 100,000 square meters of sun-soaking surface area, the solar panels we installed will generate around 200 kW of power per hour. This same amount of energy if generated by burning fossil fuels, would emit about 23 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.  “Every month when I sign electricity bill checks for the office I feel like I am throwing away money that should be saved,” said environmentally-conscious WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, the man behind this initiative. “Getting this programme up and running is an amazing feeling because I don’t have to sign those checks anymore — that money can go toward helping people.”  Previously, WFP’s electricity bill was tallying up to an average of US$10,000 per month — but now with solar energy, powering the office behind the life-saving humanitarian workforce will be completely free. That’s an extra US$120,000 that can go toward feeding families in Jordan.  “We couldn’t have made this achievement without the tremendous support from our Country Director. He encouraged us to keep going even when we faced obstacles,” Issa added.  WFP has been operating in Jordan since 1964 and has since initiated a wide range of development projects and emergency food aid operations in close collaboration with the government, corporate partners, NGOs and local communities.  In the Photo: Meticulous installation of 760 solar panels took a few months, but it was well worth the effort.  Photo: WFP/Dina El-Kassaby
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Jordan, Amman, 27 November 2017  Did you know that Jordan is one of the sunniest places on earth? With over 300 sunny days a year, harnessing that solar energy is an opportunity we couldn’t pass up.  Jordan is one of the driest, and most resource-poor countries in the world. This means the country primarily generates its electricity by burning expensive fossil fuels. Needless to say, this leaves a massive carbon footprint that could be curbed by relying on renewable energy sources.  Climate change affects rainfall, agriculture and food production, posing a direct threat to global food security and nutrition. Studies show that climate change could increase the risk of hunger and malnutrition by up to 20% by 2050. So, naturally, the world’s largest humanitarian organization fighting hunger worldwide is taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint wherever possible.  The first WFP office to make the full switch to solar energy is in Jordan. Totaling almost 100,000 square meters of sun-soaking surface area, the solar panels we installed will generate around 200 kW of power per hour. This same amount of energy if generated by burning fossil fuels, would emit about 23 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.  “Every month when I sign electricity bill checks for the office I feel like I am throwing away money that should be saved,” said environmentally-conscious WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, the man behind this initiative. “Getting this programme up and running is an amazing feeling because I don’t have to sign those checks anymore — that money can go toward helping people.”  Previously, WFP’s electricity bill was tallying up to an average of US$10,000 per month — but now with solar energy, powering the office behind the life-saving humanitarian workforce will be completely free. That’s an extra US$120,000 that can go toward feeding families in Jordan.  “We couldn’t have made this achievement without the tremendous support from our Country Director. He encouraged us to keep going even when we faced obstacles,” Issa added.  WFP has been operating in Jordan since 1964 and has since initiated a wide range of development projects and emergency food aid operations in close collaboration with the government, corporate partners, NGOs and local communities.  In the Photo: WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, explains the cost and benefits of solar energy.  Photo: WFP/Dina El-Kassaby
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Jordan, Amman, 27 November 2017  Did you know that Jordan is one of the sunniest places on earth? With over 300 sunny days a year, harnessing that solar energy is an opportunity we couldn’t pass up.  Jordan is one of the driest, and most resource-poor countries in the world. This means the country primarily generates its electricity by burning expensive fossil fuels. Needless to say, this leaves a massive carbon footprint that could be curbed by relying on renewable energy sources.  Climate change affects rainfall, agriculture and food production, posing a direct threat to global food security and nutrition. Studies show that climate change could increase the risk of hunger and malnutrition by up to 20% by 2050. So, naturally, the world’s largest humanitarian organization fighting hunger worldwide is taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint wherever possible.  The first WFP office to make the full switch to solar energy is in Jordan. Totaling almost 100,000 square meters of sun-soaking surface area, the solar panels we installed will generate around 200 kW of power per hour. This same amount of energy if generated by burning fossil fuels, would emit about 23 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.  “Every month when I sign electricity bill checks for the office I feel like I am throwing away money that should be saved,” said environmentally-conscious WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, the man behind this initiative. “Getting this programme up and running is an amazing feeling because I don’t have to sign those checks anymore — that money can go toward helping people.”  Previously, WFP’s electricity bill was tallying up to an average of US$10,000 per month — but now with solar energy, powering the office behind the life-saving humanitarian workforce will be completely free. That’s an extra US$120,000 that can go toward feeding families in Jordan.  “We couldn’t have made this achievement without the tremendous support from our Country Director. He encouraged us to keep going even when we faced obstacles,” Issa added.  WFP has been operating in Jordan since 1964 and has since initiated a wide range of development projects and emergency food aid operations in close collaboration with the government, corporate partners, NGOs and local communities.  In the Photo: Aerial view of sun-soaking solar panels with the dual purpose of serving as cover for the staff car park at WFP’s office in Amman.   Photo: WFP/Dina El-Kassaby
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Jordan, Amman, 27 November 2017  Did you know that Jordan is one of the sunniest places on earth? With over 300 sunny days a year, harnessing that solar energy is an opportunity we couldn’t pass up.  Jordan is one of the driest, and most resource-poor countries in the world. This means the country primarily generates its electricity by burning expensive fossil fuels. Needless to say, this leaves a massive carbon footprint that could be curbed by relying on renewable energy sources.  Climate change affects rainfall, agriculture and food production, posing a direct threat to global food security and nutrition. Studies show that climate change could increase the risk of hunger and malnutrition by up to 20% by 2050. So, naturally, the world’s largest humanitarian organization fighting hunger worldwide is taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint wherever possible.  The first WFP office to make the full switch to solar energy is in Jordan. Totaling almost 100,000 square meters of sun-soaking surface area, the solar panels we installed will generate around 200 kW of power per hour. This same amount of energy if generated by burning fossil fuels, would emit about 23 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.  “Every month when I sign electricity bill checks for the office I feel like I am throwing away money that should be saved,” said environmentally-conscious WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, the man behind this initiative. “Getting this programme up and running is an amazing feeling because I don’t have to sign those checks anymore — that money can go toward helping people.”  Previously, WFP’s electricity bill was tallying up to an average of US$10,000 per month — but now with solar energy, powering the office behind the life-saving humanitarian workforce will be completely free. That’s an extra US$120,000 that can go toward feeding families in Jordan.  “We couldn’t have made this achievement without the tremendous support from our Country Director. He encouraged us to keep going even when we faced obstacles,” Issa added.  WFP has been operating in Jordan since 1964 and has since initiated a wide range of development projects and emergency food aid operations in close collaboration with the government, corporate partners, NGOs and local communities.  In the Photo: WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, explains the cost and benefits of solar energy.  Photo: WFP/Dina El-Kassaby
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Jordan, Amman, 27 November 2017  Did you know that Jordan is one of the sunniest places on earth? With over 300 sunny days a year, harnessing that solar energy is an opportunity we couldn’t pass up.  Jordan is one of the driest, and most resource-poor countries in the world. This means the country primarily generates its electricity by burning expensive fossil fuels. Needless to say, this leaves a massive carbon footprint that could be curbed by relying on renewable energy sources.  Climate change affects rainfall, agriculture and food production, posing a direct threat to global food security and nutrition. Studies show that climate change could increase the risk of hunger and malnutrition by up to 20% by 2050. So, naturally, the world’s largest humanitarian organization fighting hunger worldwide is taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint wherever possible.  The first WFP office to make the full switch to solar energy is in Jordan. Totaling almost 100,000 square meters of sun-soaking surface area, the solar panels we installed will generate around 200 kW of power per hour. This same amount of energy if generated by burning fossil fuels, would emit about 23 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.  “Every month when I sign electricity bill checks for the office I feel like I am throwing away money that should be saved,” said environmentally-conscious WFP Administration Officer Khaled Issa, the man behind this initiative. “Getting this programme up and running is an amazing feeling because I don’t have to sign those checks anymore — that money can go toward helping people.”  Previously, WFP’s electricity bill was tallying up to an average of US$10,000 per month — but now with solar energy, powering the office behind the life-saving humanitarian workforce will be completely free. That’s an extra US$120,000 that can go toward feeding families in Jordan.  “We couldn’t have made this achievement without the tremendous support from our Country Director. He encouraged us to keep going even when we faced obstacles,” Issa added.  WFP has been operating in Jordan since 1964 and has since initiated a wide range of development projects and emergency food aid operations in close collaboration with the government, corporate partners, NGOs and local communities.  In the Photo: Aerial view of sun-soaking solar panels with the dual purpose of serving as cover for the staff car park at WFP’s office in Amman.   Photo: WFP/Dina El-Kassaby
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