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Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Biroko, 26 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Jean Ben Lambo
DRC_20180626_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 6601.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Biroko, 26 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Jean Ben Lambo
DRC_20180626_W....JPG
800 x 533 px 6.77 x 4.51 cm 232.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Biroko, 26 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Jean Ben Lambo
DRC_20180626_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 6874.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Biroko, 26 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Jean Ben Lambo
DRC_20180626_W....JPG
820 x 546 px 6.94 x 4.62 cm 210.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Biroko, 26 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Jean Ben Lambo
DRC_20180626_W....JPG
1000 x 666 px 8.47 x 5.64 cm 381.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Biroko, 26 June 2018  Families of Ebola patients discharged from treatment centres, and of those who have had contact with them or suspected victims, are receiving up to three months’ supplies of cereals and beans delivered by Oxfam, a WFP cooperating partner. A projected 1,000 people are to be immediately assisted. UNICEF is also providing food to those affected.   “The combined efforts of the government, the UN and NGOs are winning this battle, as the stemming of the number of Ebola cases shows”, said Jose Barahona, Oxfam’s DRC Country Director. “But we will continue working all out until the outbreak is well and truly over”.  WFP has contributed to the aid effort since the Ebola crisis was declared a month ago, playing an active role in overall response coordination led by the DRC’s Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation.  As the UN’s humanitarian logistics lead, WFP promptly deployed a dedicated expert to Mbandaka, Equateur’s capital, to identify gaps and facilitate partner response.  The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) operates daily flights between Kinshasa, Mbandaka and other urban centres in Equateur, ferrying humanitarian workers and cargo, including mobile laboratories and protection equipment.  A reconfigured UNHAS-chartered Mi-8 helicopter, equipped with a decontamination chamber and two isolation cells, can safely move infected patients or suspected cases from more remote locations.  “I am confident that this Ebola outbreak will soon be contained”, said Claude Jibidar, WFP’s DRC Country Director. “The response has been robust and rigorous, and is providing the appropriate care for those affected”.  In the Photo: WFP and its partner OXFAM are starting food distributions to save lives of people affected by the Ebola outbreak in Iboko, Itipo and Bikoro areas, in Equateur province, DRC.   Photo: WFP/Jean Ben Lambo
DRC_20180626_W....JPG
1000 x 666 px 8.47 x 5.64 cm 282.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 12 June 2018  From 2013 to the present day, food and nutrition indicators have continued to deteriorate as the conflict situation persists. In July 2016, the fresh outbreak of violence was yet another factor in further eroding the assets and coping mechanisms of the South Sudan population. This downward trajectory has also been fueled by an economic crisis which has led to a catastrophic loss in purchasing power. Following the December 2013 crisis, millions of people in South Sudan were displaced from their homes and many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) evacuated, leaving vulnerable populations without access to food, health or nutrition services. This gap exacerbated the already fragile nutrition situation in the country. The levels of acute malnutrition remain at crisis levels and malnutrition continues to be a major public health emergency in South Sudan. WFP aims to contribute to the reduction of child and maternal malnutrition including intensifying nutrition preventive programmes through effective partnerships with the government, UNICEF and the non-conventional partners that will complement the nutrition specific and sensitive interventions.  In the Photo: Mary, 32 years old, breast feeding her twins outside their family house.  One of her babies, Elizabeth, 9 months old, was diagnosed with malnutrition and is now receiving WFP super cereal as treatment. The family has been struggling to survive. Mary and her children depend on her husband’s income. He works for the government and often stays 6/7 months without receiving his salary. “Life is difficult because I don’t have work and we depend on my husband’s income. If he brings something we eat, if not, we don’t.”  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
SSD_20180612_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 20717.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 12 June 2018  From 2013 to the present day, food and nutrition indicators have continued to deteriorate as the conflict situation persists. In July 2016, the fresh outbreak of violence was yet another factor in further eroding the assets and coping mechanisms of the South Sudan population. This downward trajectory has also been fueled by an economic crisis which has led to a catastrophic loss in purchasing power. Following the December 2013 crisis, millions of people in South Sudan were displaced from their homes and many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) evacuated, leaving vulnerable populations without access to food, health or nutrition services. This gap exacerbated the already fragile nutrition situation in the country. The levels of acute malnutrition remain at crisis levels and malnutrition continues to be a major public health emergency in South Sudan. WFP aims to contribute to the reduction of child and maternal malnutrition including intensifying nutrition preventive programmes through effective partnerships with the government, UNICEF and the non-conventional partners that will complement the nutrition specific and sensitive interventions.  In the Photo: Mary, 32 years old, breast feeding her twins outside their family house.  One of her babies, Elizabeth, 9 months old, was diagnosed with malnutrition and is now receiving WFP super cereal as treatment. The family has been struggling to survive. Mary and her children depend on her husband’s income. He works for the government and often stays 6/7 months without receiving his salary. “Life is difficult because I don’t have work and we depend on my husband’s income. If he brings something we eat, if not, we don’t.”  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
SSD_20180612_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 18459.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 12 June 2018  From 2013 to the present day, food and nutrition indicators have continued to deteriorate as the conflict situation persists. In July 2016, the fresh outbreak of violence was yet another factor in further eroding the assets and coping mechanisms of the South Sudan population. This downward trajectory has also been fueled by an economic crisis which has led to a catastrophic loss in purchasing power. Following the December 2013 crisis, millions of people in South Sudan were displaced from their homes and many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) evacuated, leaving vulnerable populations without access to food, health or nutrition services. This gap exacerbated the already fragile nutrition situation in the country. The levels of acute malnutrition remain at crisis levels and malnutrition continues to be a major public health emergency in South Sudan. WFP aims to contribute to the reduction of child and maternal malnutrition including intensifying nutrition preventive programmes through effective partnerships with the government, UNICEF and the non-conventional partners that will complement the nutrition specific and sensitive interventions.  In the Photo: Mary, 32 years old, breast feeding her twins outside their family house.  One of her babies, Elizabeth, 9 months old, was diagnosed with malnutrition and is now receiving WFP super cereal as treatment. The family has been struggling to survive. Mary and her children depend on her husband’s income. He works for the government and often stays 6/7 months without receiving his salary. “Life is difficult because I don’t have work and we depend on my husband’s income. If he brings something we eat, if not, we don’t.”  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
SSD_20180612_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 20436.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 12 June 2018  From 2013 to the present day, food and nutrition indicators have continued to deteriorate as the conflict situation persists. In July 2016, the fresh outbreak of violence was yet another factor in further eroding the assets and coping mechanisms of the South Sudan population. This downward trajectory has also been fueled by an economic crisis which has led to a catastrophic loss in purchasing power. Following the December 2013 crisis, millions of people in South Sudan were displaced from their homes and many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) evacuated, leaving vulnerable populations without access to food, health or nutrition services. This gap exacerbated the already fragile nutrition situation in the country. The levels of acute malnutrition remain at crisis levels and malnutrition continues to be a major public health emergency in South Sudan. WFP aims to contribute to the reduction of child and maternal malnutrition including intensifying nutrition preventive programmes through effective partnerships with the government, UNICEF and the non-conventional partners that will complement the nutrition specific and sensitive interventions.  In the Photo: Mary, 32 years old, breast feeding her twins outside their family house.  One of her babies, Elizabeth, 9 months old, was diagnosed with malnutrition and is now receiving WFP super cereal as treatment. The family has been struggling to survive. Mary and her children depend on her husband’s income. He works for the government and often stays 6/7 months without receiving his salary. “Life is difficult because I don’t have work and we depend on my husband’s income. If he brings something we eat, if not, we don’t.”  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
SSD_20180612_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 18124.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 12 June 2018  From 2013 to the present day, food and nutrition indicators have continued to deteriorate as the conflict situation persists. In July 2016, the fresh outbreak of violence was yet another factor in further eroding the assets and coping mechanisms of the South Sudan population. This downward trajectory has also been fueled by an economic crisis which has led to a catastrophic loss in purchasing power. Following the December 2013 crisis, millions of people in South Sudan were displaced from their homes and many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) evacuated, leaving vulnerable populations without access to food, health or nutrition services. This gap exacerbated the already fragile nutrition situation in the country. The levels of acute malnutrition remain at crisis levels and malnutrition continues to be a major public health emergency in South Sudan. WFP aims to contribute to the reduction of child and maternal malnutrition including intensifying nutrition preventive programmes through effective partnerships with the government, UNICEF and the non-conventional partners that will complement the nutrition specific and sensitive interventions.  In the Photo: Mary, 32 years old, breast feeding her twins inside their family house.  One of her babies, Elizabeth, 9 months old, was diagnosed with malnutrition and is now receiving WFP super cereal as treatment. The family has been struggling to survive. Mary and her children depend on her husband’s income. He works for the government and often stays 6/7 months without receiving his salary. “Life is difficult because I don’t have work and we depend on my husband’s income. If he brings something we eat, if not, we don’t.”  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
SSD_20180612_W....JPG
4480 x 6720 px 37.93 x 56.90 cm 19099.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 12 June 2018  From 2013 to the present day, food and nutrition indicators have continued to deteriorate as the conflict situation persists. In July 2016, the fresh outbreak of violence was yet another factor in further eroding the assets and coping mechanisms of the South Sudan population. This downward trajectory has also been fueled by an economic crisis which has led to a catastrophic loss in purchasing power. Following the December 2013 crisis, millions of people in South Sudan were displaced from their homes and many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) evacuated, leaving vulnerable populations without access to food, health or nutrition services. This gap exacerbated the already fragile nutrition situation in the country. The levels of acute malnutrition remain at crisis levels and malnutrition continues to be a major public health emergency in South Sudan. WFP aims to contribute to the reduction of child and maternal malnutrition including intensifying nutrition preventive programmes through effective partnerships with the government, UNICEF and the non-conventional partners that will complement the nutrition specific and sensitive interventions.  In the Photo: Mary, 32 years old, breast feeding her twins inside their family house.  One of her babies, Elizabeth, 9 months old, was diagnosed with malnutrition and is now receiving WFP super cereal as treatment. The family has been struggling to survive. Mary and her children depend on her husband’s income. He works for the government and often stays 6/7 months without receiving his salary. “Life is difficult because I don’t have work and we depend on my husband’s income. If he brings something we eat, if not, we don’t.”  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
SSD_20180612_W....JPG
3808 x 5714 px 32.24 x 48.38 cm 14752.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 12 June 2018  From 2013 to the present day, food and nutrition indicators have continued to deteriorate as the conflict situation persists. In July 2016, the fresh outbreak of violence was yet another factor in further eroding the assets and coping mechanisms of the South Sudan population. This downward trajectory has also been fueled by an economic crisis which has led to a catastrophic loss in purchasing power. Following the December 2013 crisis, millions of people in South Sudan were displaced from their homes and many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) evacuated, leaving vulnerable populations without access to food, health or nutrition services. This gap exacerbated the already fragile nutrition situation in the country. The levels of acute malnutrition remain at crisis levels and malnutrition continues to be a major public health emergency in South Sudan. WFP aims to contribute to the reduction of child and maternal malnutrition including intensifying nutrition preventive programmes through effective partnerships with the government, UNICEF and the non-conventional partners that will complement the nutrition specific and sensitive interventions.  In the Photo: Mary, 32 years old, breast feeding her twins inside their family house.  One of her babies, Elizabeth, 9 months old, was diagnosed with malnutrition and is now receiving WFP super cereal as treatment. The family has been struggling to survive. Mary and her children depend on her husband’s income. He works for the government and often stays 6/7 months without receiving his salary. “Life is difficult because I don’t have work and we depend on my husband’s income. If he brings something we eat, if not, we don’t.”  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
SSD_20180612_W....JPG
6270 x 4131 px 53.09 x 34.98 cm 17993.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 12 June 2018  From 2013 to the present day, food and nutrition indicators have continued to deteriorate as the conflict situation persists. In July 2016, the fresh outbreak of violence was yet another factor in further eroding the assets and coping mechanisms of the South Sudan population. This downward trajectory has also been fueled by an economic crisis which has led to a catastrophic loss in purchasing power. Following the December 2013 crisis, millions of people in South Sudan were displaced from their homes and many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) evacuated, leaving vulnerable populations without access to food, health or nutrition services. This gap exacerbated the already fragile nutrition situation in the country. The levels of acute malnutrition remain at crisis levels and malnutrition continues to be a major public health emergency in South Sudan. WFP aims to contribute to the reduction of child and maternal malnutrition including intensifying nutrition preventive programmes through effective partnerships with the government, UNICEF and the non-conventional partners that will complement the nutrition specific and sensitive interventions.  In the Photo: Mary, 32 years old, breast feeding her twins inside their family house.  One of her babies, Elizabeth, 9 months old, was diagnosed with malnutrition and is now receiving WFP super cereal as treatment. The family has been struggling to survive. Mary and her children depend on her husband’s income. He works for the government and often stays 6/7 months without receiving his salary. “Life is difficult because I don’t have work and we depend on my husband’s income. If he brings something we eat, if not, we don’t.”  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
SSD_20180612_W....JPG
6073 x 4049 px 51.42 x 34.28 cm 16875.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 12 June 2018  From 2013 to the present day, food and nutrition indicators have continued to deteriorate as the conflict situation persists. In July 2016, the fresh outbreak of violence was yet another factor in further eroding the assets and coping mechanisms of the South Sudan population. This downward trajectory has also been fueled by an economic crisis which has led to a catastrophic loss in purchasing power. Following the December 2013 crisis, millions of people in South Sudan were displaced from their homes and many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) evacuated, leaving vulnerable populations without access to food, health or nutrition services. This gap exacerbated the already fragile nutrition situation in the country. The levels of acute malnutrition remain at crisis levels and malnutrition continues to be a major public health emergency in South Sudan. WFP aims to contribute to the reduction of child and maternal malnutrition including intensifying nutrition preventive programmes through effective partnerships with the government, UNICEF and the non-conventional partners that will complement the nutrition specific and sensitive interventions.  In the Photo: Mary, 32 years old, breast feeding her twins inside their family house.  One of her babies, Elizabeth, 9 months old, was diagnosed with malnutrition and is now receiving WFP super cereal as treatment. The family has been struggling to survive. Mary and her children depend on her husband’s income. He works for the government and often stays 6/7 months without receiving his salary. “Life is difficult because I don’t have work and we depend on my husband’s income. If he brings something we eat, if not, we don’t.”  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
SSD_20180612_W....JPG
6151 x 4150 px 52.08 x 35.14 cm 17478.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 12 June 2018  From 2013 to the present day, food and nutrition indicators have continued to deteriorate as the conflict situation persists. In July 2016, the fresh outbreak of violence was yet another factor in further eroding the assets and coping mechanisms of the South Sudan population. This downward trajectory has also been fueled by an economic crisis which has led to a catastrophic loss in purchasing power. Following the December 2013 crisis, millions of people in South Sudan were displaced from their homes and many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) evacuated, leaving vulnerable populations without access to food, health or nutrition services. This gap exacerbated the already fragile nutrition situation in the country. The levels of acute malnutrition remain at crisis levels and malnutrition continues to be a major public health emergency in South Sudan. WFP aims to contribute to the reduction of child and maternal malnutrition including intensifying nutrition preventive programmes through effective partnerships with the government, UNICEF and the non-conventional partners that will complement the nutrition specific and sensitive interventions.  In the Photo: Mary, 32 years old, breast feeding her twins inside their family house.  One of her babies, Elizabeth, 9 months old, was diagnosed with malnutrition and is now receiving WFP super cereal as treatment. The family has been struggling to survive. Mary and her children depend on her husband’s income. He works for the government and often stays 6/7 months without receiving his salary. “Life is difficult because I don’t have work and we depend on my husband’s income. If he brings something we eat, if not, we don’t.”  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
SSD_20180612_W....JPG
6190 x 4127 px 52.41 x 34.94 cm 15512.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 12 June 2018  From 2013 to the present day, food and nutrition indicators have continued to deteriorate as the conflict situation persists. In July 2016, the fresh outbreak of violence was yet another factor in further eroding the assets and coping mechanisms of the South Sudan population. This downward trajectory has also been fueled by an economic crisis which has led to a catastrophic loss in purchasing power. Following the December 2013 crisis, millions of people in South Sudan were displaced from their homes and many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) evacuated, leaving vulnerable populations without access to food, health or nutrition services. This gap exacerbated the already fragile nutrition situation in the country. The levels of acute malnutrition remain at crisis levels and malnutrition continues to be a major public health emergency in South Sudan. WFP aims to contribute to the reduction of child and maternal malnutrition including intensifying nutrition preventive programmes through effective partnerships with the government, UNICEF and the non-conventional partners that will complement the nutrition specific and sensitive interventions.  In the Photo: Mary, 32 years old, breast feeding her twins inside their family house.  One of her babies, Elizabeth, 9 months old, was diagnosed with malnutrition and is now receiving WFP super cereal as treatment. The family has been struggling to survive. Mary and her children depend on her husband’s income. He works for the government and often stays 6/7 months without receiving his salary. “Life is difficult because I don’t have work and we depend on my husband’s income. If he brings something we eat, if not, we don’t.”  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
SSD_20180612_W....JPG
6255 x 4170 px 52.96 x 35.31 cm 17145.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 12 June 2018  From 2013 to the present day, food and nutrition indicators have continued to deteriorate as the conflict situation persists. In July 2016, the fresh outbreak of violence was yet another factor in further eroding the assets and coping mechanisms of the South Sudan population. This downward trajectory has also been fueled by an economic crisis which has led to a catastrophic loss in purchasing power. Following the December 2013 crisis, millions of people in South Sudan were displaced from their homes and many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) evacuated, leaving vulnerable populations without access to food, health or nutrition services. This gap exacerbated the already fragile nutrition situation in the country. The levels of acute malnutrition remain at crisis levels and malnutrition continues to be a major public health emergency in South Sudan. WFP aims to contribute to the reduction of child and maternal malnutrition including intensifying nutrition preventive programmes through effective partnerships with the government, UNICEF and the non-conventional partners that will complement the nutrition specific and sensitive interventions.  In the Photo: Cecilia, 38 years old, breast feeding her son Samuel Jebara, 2.5 years old, inside her house.  Cecilia have been receiving WFP Super Cereal since she was 4 months pregnant.  WFP provides Super Cereal Plus, a specialized nutrition food made with corn, wheat, rice, soy, milk powder, sugar, oil, vitamins and minerals for pregnant and lactating mother to treat and prevent for acute malnutrition in their children.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
SSD_20180612_W....JPG
2987 x 4480 px 25.29 x 37.93 cm 6758.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 12 June 2018  From 2013 to the present day, food and nutrition indicators have continued to deteriorate as the conflict situation persists. In July 2016, the fresh outbreak of violence was yet another factor in further eroding the assets and coping mechanisms of the South Sudan population. This downward trajectory has also been fueled by an economic crisis which has led to a catastrophic loss in purchasing power. Following the December 2013 crisis, millions of people in South Sudan were displaced from their homes and many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) evacuated, leaving vulnerable populations without access to food, health or nutrition services. This gap exacerbated the already fragile nutrition situation in the country. The levels of acute malnutrition remain at crisis levels and malnutrition continues to be a major public health emergency in South Sudan. WFP aims to contribute to the reduction of child and maternal malnutrition including intensifying nutrition preventive programmes through effective partnerships with the government, UNICEF and the non-conventional partners that will complement the nutrition specific and sensitive interventions.  In the Photo: Cecilia, 38 years old, breast feeding her son Samuel Jebara, 2.5 years old, inside her house.  Cecilia have been receiving WFP Super Cereal since she was 4 months pregnant.  WFP provides Super Cereal Plus, a specialized nutrition food made with corn, wheat, rice, soy, milk powder, sugar, oil, vitamins and minerals for pregnant and lactating mother to treat and prevent for acute malnutrition in their children.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
SSD_20180612_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 14581.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 12 June 2018  From 2013 to the present day, food and nutrition indicators have continued to deteriorate as the conflict situation persists. In July 2016, the fresh outbreak of violence was yet another factor in further eroding the assets and coping mechanisms of the South Sudan population. This downward trajectory has also been fueled by an economic crisis which has led to a catastrophic loss in purchasing power. Following the December 2013 crisis, millions of people in South Sudan were displaced from their homes and many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) evacuated, leaving vulnerable populations without access to food, health or nutrition services. This gap exacerbated the already fragile nutrition situation in the country. The levels of acute malnutrition remain at crisis levels and malnutrition continues to be a major public health emergency in South Sudan. WFP aims to contribute to the reduction of child and maternal malnutrition including intensifying nutrition preventive programmes through effective partnerships with the government, UNICEF and the non-conventional partners that will complement the nutrition specific and sensitive interventions.  In the Photo: Cecilia, 38 years old, breast feeding her son Samuel Jebara, 2.5 years old, inside her house.  Cecilia have been receiving WFP Super Cereal since she was 4 months pregnant.  WFP provides Super Cereal Plus, a specialized nutrition food made with corn, wheat, rice, soy, milk powder, sugar, oil, vitamins and minerals for pregnant and lactating mother to treat and prevent for acute malnutrition in their children.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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6720 x 4480 px 56.90 x 37.93 cm 15714.00 kb
 
South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 12 June 2018  From 2013 to the present day, food and nutrition indicators have continued to deteriorate as the conflict situation persists. In July 2016, the fresh outbreak of violence was yet another factor in further eroding the assets and coping mechanisms of the South Sudan population. This downward trajectory has also been fueled by an economic crisis which has led to a catastrophic loss in purchasing power. Following the December 2013 crisis, millions of people in South Sudan were displaced from their homes and many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) evacuated, leaving vulnerable populations without access to food, health or nutrition services. This gap exacerbated the already fragile nutrition situation in the country. The levels of acute malnutrition remain at crisis levels and malnutrition continues to be a major public health emergency in South Sudan. WFP aims to contribute to the reduction of child and maternal malnutrition including intensifying nutrition preventive programmes through effective partnerships with the government, UNICEF and the non-conventional partners that will complement the nutrition specific and sensitive interventions.  In the Photo: Cecilia, 38 years old, breast feeding her son Samuel Jebara, 2.5 years old, inside her house.  Cecilia have been receiving WFP Super Cereal since she was 4 months pregnant.  WFP provides Super Cereal Plus, a specialized nutrition food made with corn, wheat, rice, soy, milk powder, sugar, oil, vitamins and minerals for pregnant and lactating mother to treat and prevent for acute malnutrition in their children.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 12 June 2018  From 2013 to the present day, food and nutrition indicators have continued to deteriorate as the conflict situation persists. In July 2016, the fresh outbreak of violence was yet another factor in further eroding the assets and coping mechanisms of the South Sudan population. This downward trajectory has also been fueled by an economic crisis which has led to a catastrophic loss in purchasing power. Following the December 2013 crisis, millions of people in South Sudan were displaced from their homes and many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) evacuated, leaving vulnerable populations without access to food, health or nutrition services. This gap exacerbated the already fragile nutrition situation in the country. The levels of acute malnutrition remain at crisis levels and malnutrition continues to be a major public health emergency in South Sudan. WFP aims to contribute to the reduction of child and maternal malnutrition including intensifying nutrition preventive programmes through effective partnerships with the government, UNICEF and the non-conventional partners that will complement the nutrition specific and sensitive interventions.  In the Photo: Cecilia, 38 years old, breast feeding her son Samuel Jebara, 2.5 years old, inside her house.  Cecilia have been receiving WFP Super Cereal since she was 4 months pregnant.  WFP provides Super Cereal Plus, a specialized nutrition food made with corn, wheat, rice, soy, milk powder, sugar, oil, vitamins and minerals for pregnant and lactating mother to treat and prevent for acute malnutrition in their children.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 12 June 2018  From 2013 to the present day, food and nutrition indicators have continued to deteriorate as the conflict situation persists. In July 2016, the fresh outbreak of violence was yet another factor in further eroding the assets and coping mechanisms of the South Sudan population. This downward trajectory has also been fueled by an economic crisis which has led to a catastrophic loss in purchasing power. Following the December 2013 crisis, millions of people in South Sudan were displaced from their homes and many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) evacuated, leaving vulnerable populations without access to food, health or nutrition services. This gap exacerbated the already fragile nutrition situation in the country. The levels of acute malnutrition remain at crisis levels and malnutrition continues to be a major public health emergency in South Sudan. WFP aims to contribute to the reduction of child and maternal malnutrition including intensifying nutrition preventive programmes through effective partnerships with the government, UNICEF and the non-conventional partners that will complement the nutrition specific and sensitive interventions.  In the Photo: Cecilia, 38 years old, breast feeding her son Samuel Jebara, 2.5 years old, inside her house.  Cecilia have been receiving WFP Super Cereal since she was 4 months pregnant.  WFP provides Super Cereal Plus, a specialized nutrition food made with corn, wheat, rice, soy, milk powder, sugar, oil, vitamins and minerals for pregnant and lactating mother to treat and prevent for acute malnutrition in their children.  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 12 June 2018  From 2013 to the present day, food and nutrition indicators have continued to deteriorate as the conflict situation persists. In July 2016, the fresh outbreak of violence was yet another factor in further eroding the assets and coping mechanisms of the South Sudan population. This downward trajectory has also been fueled by an economic crisis which has led to a catastrophic loss in purchasing power. Following the December 2013 crisis, millions of people in South Sudan were displaced from their homes and many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) evacuated, leaving vulnerable populations without access to food, health or nutrition services. This gap exacerbated the already fragile nutrition situation in the country. The levels of acute malnutrition remain at crisis levels and malnutrition continues to be a major public health emergency in South Sudan. WFP aims to contribute to the reduction of child and maternal malnutrition including intensifying nutrition preventive programmes through effective partnerships with the government, UNICEF and the non-conventional partners that will complement the nutrition specific and sensitive interventions.  In the Photo: Chudiar, 18 years old, breast feeding her first baby Leang (one and half month old) in her family house inside Protection of Civilians Camp 3, Juba.  She has been taking WFP Super Cereal since the final state of her pregnancy, when returned from Uganda. Chudiar left South Sudan during the conflicts in 2014 and decided to come back before the birth of her baby. “I was alone there, my parents were in South Sudan, I decided to come back before my daughter’s birth because I wanted my mother help with my baby. “Leang is healthy because I am taking the nutrition supplement. When I am breast feeding I know she will grow up healthy and will not be hungry.”  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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South Sudan, Juba (Central Equatoria State), 12 June 2018  From 2013 to the present day, food and nutrition indicators have continued to deteriorate as the conflict situation persists. In July 2016, the fresh outbreak of violence was yet another factor in further eroding the assets and coping mechanisms of the South Sudan population. This downward trajectory has also been fueled by an economic crisis which has led to a catastrophic loss in purchasing power. Following the December 2013 crisis, millions of people in South Sudan were displaced from their homes and many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) evacuated, leaving vulnerable populations without access to food, health or nutrition services. This gap exacerbated the already fragile nutrition situation in the country. The levels of acute malnutrition remain at crisis levels and malnutrition continues to be a major public health emergency in South Sudan. WFP aims to contribute to the reduction of child and maternal malnutrition including intensifying nutrition preventive programmes through effective partnerships with the government, UNICEF and the non-conventional partners that will complement the nutrition specific and sensitive interventions.  In the Photo: Chudiar, 18 years old, breast feeding her first baby Leang (one and half month old) in her family house inside Protection of Civilians Camp 3, Juba.  She has been taking WFP Super Cereal since the final state of her pregnancy, when returned from Uganda. Chudiar left South Sudan during the conflicts in 2014 and decided to come back before the birth of her baby. “I was alone there, my parents were in South Sudan, I decided to come back before my daughter’s birth because I wanted my mother help with my baby. “Leang is healthy because I am taking the nutrition supplement. When I am breast feeding I know she will grow up healthy and will not be hungry.”  Photo: WFP/Gabriela Vivacqua
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