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"purchase for progress": 1701 results 

 
Zambia, Chimpili, 11 October 2015  In Zambia, the smallholder farmers of Chimpili Cooperative are benefiting from joint support from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and the World Food Programme (WFP). With comprehensive supply-side support, improved infrastructure and market access, cooperative members are now growing sustainable businesses.   Harriet Chabala has increased her production of beans by 50 percent over the last two years. Based on her entrepreneurial skills and consistent supply to WFP for the last three marketing seasons, she received an equipment loan from the cooperative for a tricycle. The tricycle can navigate poor quality roads, enabling Harriet to provide transport services to move crops, inputs and people to and from towns and markets.   In the photo: Harriet Chabala poses with the tricycle she acquired with a loan from Chimpili Cooperative.   Photo: WFP/Evin Joyce
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5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 7162.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo, North Kivu Province, 02 December 2016  Since 2010 WFP has been strengthening smallholder farmers’ capacity to produce and trade through a Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme run with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). P4P includes trainings on agricultural techniques and organization, literacy to promote women’s role in the communities, construction of agricultural infrastructure and roads rehabilitation. It also enables farmers to connect with markets and traders, and engage in commodity bulking and collective marketing. In 2016 P4P expanded to North Kivu province.  In the photo: WFP DRC Country Director Claude Jibidar vists a new Purchase for Progress programme launched in North Kivu in early 2016. 250 women who participated in a literacy programme received sewing machines.   Photo: WFP/Jacques David
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5244.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo, North Kivu Province, 02 December 2016  Since 2010 WFP has been strengthening smallholder farmers’ capacity to produce and trade through a Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme run with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). P4P includes trainings on agricultural techniques and organization, literacy to promote women’s role in the communities, construction of agricultural infrastructure and roads rehabilitation. It also enables farmers to connect with markets and traders, and engage in commodity bulking and collective marketing. In 2016 P4P expanded to North Kivu province.  In the photo: WFP DRC Country Director Claude Jibidar vists a new Purchase for Progress programme launched in North Kivu in early 2016. 250 women who participated in a literacy programme received sewing machines.   Photo: WFP/Jacques David
DRC_20161202_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5081.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo, North Kivu Province, 02 December 2016  Since 2010 WFP has been strengthening smallholder farmers’ capacity to produce and trade through a Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme run with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). P4P includes trainings on agricultural techniques and organization, literacy to promote women’s role in the communities, construction of agricultural infrastructure and roads rehabilitation. It also enables farmers to connect with markets and traders, and engage in commodity bulking and collective marketing. In 2016 P4P expanded to North Kivu province.  In the photo: WFP DRC Country Director Claude Jibidar vists a new Purchase for Progress programme launched in North Kivu in early 2016. 250 women who participated in a literacy programme received sewing machines.   Photo: WFP/Jacques David
DRC_20161202_W....JPG
5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 6806.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District, 7th November 2016  WFP is building on the progress made by the purchase for progress (P4P) initiative in supporting the Ministry of Agriculture to strengthen its ability to assist small-holder farmers’ access to markets, while also enhancing their capacity in post-harvest handling, storage, commodity tracking, and management of the national strategic food reserves.   Joyce 47, has five children. She lives in Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District (Eastern Rwanda). She is a small-scale farmer and is a member of the KOREMU farmer’s organisation (cooperative) that benefits from the technical expertise provided by WFP. The “Murama” farmers’ organisation was established in 2011, accredited by National cooperatives Union. KOREMU counts 350 members, out of which 48.5 percent are women.  As a consequence of the erratic climate patterns the rainy season started late and the crops that Joyce planted are behind the usual growth pattern, the phenomenon extends the duration of the lean season so by consequence food prices are higher than the average for the season. Joyce received a WFP subsidised plastic silo to store her harvested crops. Through training and coaching and help from fellow farmers who monitor each other to help reduce post-harvest losses by reducing exposure to moisture and deterioration. With the improved post-harvest handling techniques, members of the KOREMU farmers’ cooperative have doubled the produce sold to national markets at each harvest.  In the photo: Grace Mukamana (Vice President of KOREMU cooperative) illustrates the various facilities that are made available to the farmers who are part of the cooperative.
The harvest drying room.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 5318.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District, 7th November 2016  WFP is building on the progress made by the purchase for progress (P4P) initiative in supporting the Ministry of Agriculture to strengthen its ability to assist small-holder farmers’ access to markets, while also enhancing their capacity in post-harvest handling, storage, commodity tracking, and management of the national strategic food reserves.   Joyce 47, has five children. She lives in Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District (Eastern Rwanda). She is a small-scale farmer and is a member of the KOREMU farmer’s organisation (cooperative) that benefits from the technical expertise provided by WFP. The “Murama” farmers’ organisation was established in 2011, accredited by National cooperatives Union. KOREMU counts 350 members, out of which 48.5 percent are women.  As a consequence of the erratic climate patterns the rainy season started late and the crops that Joyce planted are behind the usual growth pattern, the phenomenon extends the duration of the lean season so by consequence food prices are higher than the average for the season. Joyce received a WFP subsidised plastic silo to store her harvested crops. Through training and coaching and help from fellow farmers who monitor each other to help reduce post-harvest losses by reducing exposure to moisture and deterioration. With the improved post-harvest handling techniques, members of the KOREMU farmers’ cooperative have doubled the produce sold to national markets at each harvest.  In the photo: Grace Mukamana (left, Vice President of KOREMU cooperative) illustrates the various facilities that are made available to the farmers who are part of the cooperative.
This is the maize shelling machine.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161107_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 4561.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District, 7th November 2016  WFP is building on the progress made by the purchase for progress (P4P) initiative in supporting the Ministry of Agriculture to strengthen its ability to assist small-holder farmers’ access to markets, while also enhancing their capacity in post-harvest handling, storage, commodity tracking, and management of the national strategic food reserves.   Joyce 47, has five children. She lives in Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District (Eastern Rwanda). She is a small-scale farmer and is a member of the KOREMU farmer’s organisation (cooperative) that benefits from the technical expertise provided by WFP. The “Murama” farmers’ organisation was established in 2011, accredited by National cooperatives Union. KOREMU counts 350 members, out of which 48.5 percent are women.  As a consequence of the erratic climate patterns the rainy season started late and the crops that Joyce planted are behind the usual growth pattern, the phenomenon extends the duration of the lean season so by consequence food prices are higher than the average for the season. Joyce received a WFP subsidised plastic silo to store her harvested crops. Through training and coaching and help from fellow farmers who monitor each other to help reduce post-harvest losses by reducing exposure to moisture and deterioration. With the improved post-harvest handling techniques, members of the KOREMU farmers’ cooperative have doubled the produce sold to national markets at each harvest.  In the photo: Grace Mukamana (Vice President of KOREMU cooperative) illustrates the various facilities that are made available to the farmers who are part of the cooperative.
The harvest drying room.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161107_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 3975.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District, 7th November 2016  WFP is building on the progress made by the purchase for progress (P4P) initiative in supporting the Ministry of Agriculture to strengthen its ability to assist small-holder farmers’ access to markets, while also enhancing their capacity in post-harvest handling, storage, commodity tracking, and management of the national strategic food reserves.   Joyce 47, has five children. She lives in Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District (Eastern Rwanda). She is a small-scale farmer and is a member of the KOREMU farmer’s organisation (cooperative) that benefits from the technical expertise provided by WFP. The “Murama” farmers’ organisation was established in 2011, accredited by National cooperatives Union. KOREMU counts 350 members, out of which 48.5 percent are women.  As a consequence of the erratic climate patterns the rainy season started late and the crops that Joyce planted are behind the usual growth pattern, the phenomenon extends the duration of the lean season so by consequence food prices are higher than the average for the season. Joyce received a WFP subsidised plastic silo to store her harvested crops. Through training and coaching and help from fellow farmers who monitor each other to help reduce post-harvest losses by reducing exposure to moisture and deterioration. With the improved post-harvest handling techniques, members of the KOREMU farmers’ cooperative have doubled the produce sold to national markets at each harvest.  In the photo: Grace Mukamana (Vice President of KOREMU cooperative) illustrates the various facilities that are made available to the farmers who are part of the cooperative.
This is the maize shelling machine.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161107_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 5374.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District, 7th November 2016  WFP is building on the progress made by the purchase for progress (P4P) initiative in supporting the Ministry of Agriculture to strengthen its ability to assist small-holder farmers’ access to markets, while also enhancing their capacity in post-harvest handling, storage, commodity tracking, and management of the national strategic food reserves.   Joyce 47, has five children. She lives in Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District (Eastern Rwanda). She is a small-scale farmer and is a member of the KOREMU farmer’s organisation (cooperative) that benefits from the technical expertise provided by WFP. The “Murama” farmers’ organisation was established in 2011, accredited by National cooperatives Union. KOREMU counts 350 members, out of which 48.5 percent are women.  As a consequence of the erratic climate patterns the rainy season started late and the crops that Joyce planted are behind the usual growth pattern, the phenomenon extends the duration of the lean season so by consequence food prices are higher than the average for the season. Joyce received a WFP subsidised plastic silo to store her harvested crops. Through training and coaching and help from fellow farmers who monitor each other to help reduce post-harvest losses by reducing exposure to moisture and deterioration. With the improved post-harvest handling techniques, members of the KOREMU farmers’ cooperative have doubled the produce sold to national markets at each harvest.  In the photo: Grace Mukamana (Vice President of KOREMU cooperative) illustrates the various facilities that are made available to the farmers who are part of the cooperative.
The harvest drying room seen from the interior.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161107_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 6014.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District, 7th November 2016  WFP is building on the progress made by the purchase for progress (P4P) initiative in supporting the Ministry of Agriculture to strengthen its ability to assist small-holder farmers’ access to markets, while also enhancing their capacity in post-harvest handling, storage, commodity tracking, and management of the national strategic food reserves.   Joyce 47, has five children. She lives in Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District (Eastern Rwanda). She is a small-scale farmer and is a member of the KOREMU farmer’s organisation (cooperative) that benefits from the technical expertise provided by WFP. The “Murama” farmers’ organisation was established in 2011, accredited by National cooperatives Union. KOREMU counts 350 members, out of which 48.5 percent are women.  As a consequence of the erratic climate patterns the rainy season started late and the crops that Joyce planted are behind the usual growth pattern, the phenomenon extends the duration of the lean season so by consequence food prices are higher than the average for the season. Joyce received a WFP subsidised plastic silo to store her harvested crops. Through training and coaching and help from fellow farmers who monitor each other to help reduce post-harvest losses by reducing exposure to moisture and deterioration. With the improved post-harvest handling techniques, members of the KOREMU farmers’ cooperative have doubled the produce sold to national markets at each harvest.  In the photo: Joyce and two of her sons in front of their house and their maize and banana fields.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161107_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 4268.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District, 7th November 2016  WFP is building on the progress made by the purchase for progress (P4P) initiative in supporting the Ministry of Agriculture to strengthen its ability to assist small-holder farmers’ access to markets, while also enhancing their capacity in post-harvest handling, storage, commodity tracking, and management of the national strategic food reserves.   Joyce 47, has five children. She lives in Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District (Eastern Rwanda). She is a small-scale farmer and is a member of the KOREMU farmer’s organisation (cooperative) that benefits from the technical expertise provided by WFP. The “Murama” farmers’ organisation was established in 2011, accredited by National cooperatives Union. KOREMU counts 350 members, out of which 48.5 percent are women.  As a consequence of the erratic climate patterns the rainy season started late and the crops that Joyce planted are behind the usual growth pattern, the phenomenon extends the duration of the lean season so by consequence food prices are higher than the average for the season. Joyce received a WFP subsidised plastic silo to store her harvested crops. Through training and coaching and help from fellow farmers who monitor each other to help reduce post-harvest losses by reducing exposure to moisture and deterioration. With the improved post-harvest handling techniques, members of the KOREMU farmers’ cooperative have doubled the produce sold to national markets at each harvest.  In the photo: Joyce two of her sons working in her maize field.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161107_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 6976.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District, 7th November 2016  WFP is building on the progress made by the purchase for progress (P4P) initiative in supporting the Ministry of Agriculture to strengthen its ability to assist small-holder farmers’ access to markets, while also enhancing their capacity in post-harvest handling, storage, commodity tracking, and management of the national strategic food reserves.   Joyce 47, has five children. She lives in Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District (Eastern Rwanda). She is a small-scale farmer and is a member of the KOREMU farmer’s organisation (cooperative) that benefits from the technical expertise provided by WFP. The “Murama” farmers’ organisation was established in 2011, accredited by National cooperatives Union. KOREMU counts 350 members, out of which 48.5 percent are women.  As a consequence of the erratic climate patterns the rainy season started late and the crops that Joyce planted are behind the usual growth pattern, the phenomenon extends the duration of the lean season so by consequence food prices are higher than the average for the season. Joyce received a WFP subsidised plastic silo to store her harvested crops. Through training and coaching and help from fellow farmers who monitor each other to help reduce post-harvest losses by reducing exposure to moisture and deterioration. With the improved post-harvest handling techniques, members of the KOREMU farmers’ cooperative have doubled the produce sold to national markets at each harvest.  In the photo: Joyce working in her maize field.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161107_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 4082.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District, 7th November 2016  WFP is building on the progress made by the purchase for progress (P4P) initiative in supporting the Ministry of Agriculture to strengthen its ability to assist small-holder farmers’ access to markets, while also enhancing their capacity in post-harvest handling, storage, commodity tracking, and management of the national strategic food reserves.   Joyce 47, has five children. She lives in Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District (Eastern Rwanda). She is a small-scale farmer and is a member of the KOREMU farmer’s organisation (cooperative) that benefits from the technical expertise provided by WFP. The “Murama” farmers’ organisation was established in 2011, accredited by National cooperatives Union. KOREMU counts 350 members, out of which 48.5 percent are women.  As a consequence of the erratic climate patterns the rainy season started late and the crops that Joyce planted are behind the usual growth pattern, the phenomenon extends the duration of the lean season so by consequence food prices are higher than the average for the season. Joyce received a WFP subsidised plastic silo to store her harvested crops. Through training and coaching and help from fellow farmers who monitor each other to help reduce post-harvest losses by reducing exposure to moisture and deterioration. With the improved post-harvest handling techniques, members of the KOREMU farmers’ cooperative have doubled the produce sold to national markets at each harvest.  In the photo: Joyce working in her maize field.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161107_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 3574.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District, 7th November 2016  WFP is building on the progress made by the purchase for progress (P4P) initiative in supporting the Ministry of Agriculture to strengthen its ability to assist small-holder farmers’ access to markets, while also enhancing their capacity in post-harvest handling, storage, commodity tracking, and management of the national strategic food reserves.   Joyce 47, has five children. She lives in Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District (Eastern Rwanda). She is a small-scale farmer and is a member of the KOREMU farmer’s organisation (cooperative) that benefits from the technical expertise provided by WFP. The “Murama” farmers’ organisation was established in 2011, accredited by National cooperatives Union. KOREMU counts 350 members, out of which 48.5 percent are women.  As a consequence of the erratic climate patterns the rainy season started late and the crops that Joyce planted are behind the usual growth pattern, the phenomenon extends the duration of the lean season so by consequence food prices are higher than the average for the season. Joyce received a WFP subsidised plastic silo to store her harvested crops. Through training and coaching and help from fellow farmers who monitor each other to help reduce post-harvest losses by reducing exposure to moisture and deterioration. With the improved post-harvest handling techniques, members of the KOREMU farmers’ cooperative have doubled the produce sold to national markets at each harvest.  In the photo: Joyce and one of her sons working in her maize field.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161107_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 5987.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District, 7th November 2016  WFP is building on the progress made by the purchase for progress (P4P) initiative in supporting the Ministry of Agriculture to strengthen its ability to assist small-holder farmers’ access to markets, while also enhancing their capacity in post-harvest handling, storage, commodity tracking, and management of the national strategic food reserves.   Joyce 47, has five children. She lives in Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District (Eastern Rwanda). She is a small-scale farmer and is a member of the KOREMU farmer’s organisation (cooperative) that benefits from the technical expertise provided by WFP. The “Murama” farmers’ organisation was established in 2011, accredited by National cooperatives Union. KOREMU counts 350 members, out of which 48.5 percent are women.  As a consequence of the erratic climate patterns the rainy season started late and the crops that Joyce planted are behind the usual growth pattern, the phenomenon extends the duration of the lean season so by consequence food prices are higher than the average for the season. Joyce received a WFP subsidised plastic silo to store her harvested crops. Through training and coaching and help from fellow farmers who monitor each other to help reduce post-harvest losses by reducing exposure to moisture and deterioration. With the improved post-harvest handling techniques, members of the KOREMU farmers’ cooperative have doubled the produce sold to national markets at each harvest.  In the photo: Joyce working in her maize field.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161107_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 5582.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District, 7th November 2016  WFP is building on the progress made by the purchase for progress (P4P) initiative in supporting the Ministry of Agriculture to strengthen its ability to assist small-holder farmers’ access to markets, while also enhancing their capacity in post-harvest handling, storage, commodity tracking, and management of the national strategic food reserves.   Joyce 47, has five children. She lives in Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District (Eastern Rwanda). She is a small-scale farmer and is a member of the KOREMU farmer’s organisation (cooperative) that benefits from the technical expertise provided by WFP. The “Murama” farmers’ organisation was established in 2011, accredited by National cooperatives Union. KOREMU counts 350 members, out of which 48.5 percent are women.  As a consequence of the erratic climate patterns the rainy season started late and the crops that Joyce planted are behind the usual growth pattern, the phenomenon extends the duration of the lean season so by consequence food prices are higher than the average for the season. Joyce received a WFP subsidised plastic silo to store her harvested crops. Through training and coaching and help from fellow farmers who monitor each other to help reduce post-harvest losses by reducing exposure to moisture and deterioration. With the improved post-harvest handling techniques, members of the KOREMU farmers’ cooperative have doubled the produce sold to national markets at each harvest.  In the photo: Joyce working in her maize field.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161107_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 7359.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District, 7th November 2016  WFP is building on the progress made by the purchase for progress (P4P) initiative in supporting the Ministry of Agriculture to strengthen its ability to assist small-holder farmers’ access to markets, while also enhancing their capacity in post-harvest handling, storage, commodity tracking, and management of the national strategic food reserves.   Joyce 47, has five children. She lives in Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District (Eastern Rwanda). She is a small-scale farmer and is a member of the KOREMU farmer’s organisation (cooperative) that benefits from the technical expertise provided by WFP. The “Murama” farmers’ organisation was established in 2011, accredited by National cooperatives Union. KOREMU counts 350 members, out of which 48.5 percent are women.  As a consequence of the erratic climate patterns the rainy season started late and the crops that Joyce planted are behind the usual growth pattern, the phenomenon extends the duration of the lean season so by consequence food prices are higher than the average for the season. Joyce received a WFP subsidised plastic silo to store her harvested crops. Through training and coaching and help from fellow farmers who monitor each other to help reduce post-harvest losses by reducing exposure to moisture and deterioration. With the improved post-harvest handling techniques, members of the KOREMU farmers’ cooperative have doubled the produce sold to national markets at each harvest.  In the photo: Joyce and one of her sons working in her maize field.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161107_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 4941.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District, 7th November 2016  WFP is building on the progress made by the purchase for progress (P4P) initiative in supporting the Ministry of Agriculture to strengthen its ability to assist small-holder farmers’ access to markets, while also enhancing their capacity in post-harvest handling, storage, commodity tracking, and management of the national strategic food reserves.   Joyce 47, has five children. She lives in Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District (Eastern Rwanda). She is a small-scale farmer and is a member of the KOREMU farmer’s organisation (cooperative) that benefits from the technical expertise provided by WFP. The “Murama” farmers’ organisation was established in 2011, accredited by National cooperatives Union. KOREMU counts 350 members, out of which 48.5 percent are women.  As a consequence of the erratic climate patterns the rainy season started late and the crops that Joyce planted are behind the usual growth pattern, the phenomenon extends the duration of the lean season so by consequence food prices are higher than the average for the season. Joyce received a WFP subsidised plastic silo to store her harvested crops. Through training and coaching and help from fellow farmers who monitor each other to help reduce post-harvest losses by reducing exposure to moisture and deterioration. With the improved post-harvest handling techniques, members of the KOREMU farmers’ cooperative have doubled the produce sold to national markets at each harvest.  In the photo: Joyce and one of her sons working in her maize field.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161107_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 5129.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District, 7th November 2016  WFP is building on the progress made by the purchase for progress (P4P) initiative in supporting the Ministry of Agriculture to strengthen its ability to assist small-holder farmers’ access to markets, while also enhancing their capacity in post-harvest handling, storage, commodity tracking, and management of the national strategic food reserves.   Joyce 47, has five children. She lives in Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District (Eastern Rwanda). She is a small-scale farmer and is a member of the KOREMU farmer’s organisation (cooperative) that benefits from the technical expertise provided by WFP. The “Murama” farmers’ organisation was established in 2011, accredited by National cooperatives Union. KOREMU counts 350 members, out of which 48.5 percent are women.  As a consequence of the erratic climate patterns the rainy season started late and the crops that Joyce planted are behind the usual growth pattern, the phenomenon extends the duration of the lean season so by consequence food prices are higher than the average for the season. Joyce received a WFP subsidised plastic silo to store her harvested crops. Through training and coaching and help from fellow farmers who monitor each other to help reduce post-harvest losses by reducing exposure to moisture and deterioration. With the improved post-harvest handling techniques, members of the KOREMU farmers’ cooperative have doubled the produce sold to national markets at each harvest.  In the photo: One of Joyce's sons working in her maize field.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161107_W....JPG
3280 x 4928 px 27.77 x 41.72 cm 5125.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District, 7th November 2016  WFP is building on the progress made by the purchase for progress (P4P) initiative in supporting the Ministry of Agriculture to strengthen its ability to assist small-holder farmers’ access to markets, while also enhancing their capacity in post-harvest handling, storage, commodity tracking, and management of the national strategic food reserves.   Joyce 47, has five children. She lives in Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District (Eastern Rwanda). She is a small-scale farmer and is a member of the KOREMU farmer’s organisation (cooperative) that benefits from the technical expertise provided by WFP. The “Murama” farmers’ organisation was established in 2011, accredited by National cooperatives Union. KOREMU counts 350 members, out of which 48.5 percent are women.  As a consequence of the erratic climate patterns the rainy season started late and the crops that Joyce planted are behind the usual growth pattern, the phenomenon extends the duration of the lean season so by consequence food prices are higher than the average for the season. Joyce received a WFP subsidised plastic silo to store her harvested crops. Through training and coaching and help from fellow farmers who monitor each other to help reduce post-harvest losses by reducing exposure to moisture and deterioration. With the improved post-harvest handling techniques, members of the KOREMU farmers’ cooperative have doubled the produce sold to national markets at each harvest.  In the photo: One of Joyce's sons working in her maize field.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161107_W....JPG
3280 x 4928 px 27.77 x 41.72 cm 5148.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District, 7th November 2016  WFP is building on the progress made by the purchase for progress (P4P) initiative in supporting the Ministry of Agriculture to strengthen its ability to assist small-holder farmers’ access to markets, while also enhancing their capacity in post-harvest handling, storage, commodity tracking, and management of the national strategic food reserves.   Joyce 47, has five children. She lives in Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District (Eastern Rwanda). She is a small-scale farmer and is a member of the KOREMU farmer’s organisation (cooperative) that benefits from the technical expertise provided by WFP. The “Murama” farmers’ organisation was established in 2011, accredited by National cooperatives Union. KOREMU counts 350 members, out of which 48.5 percent are women.  As a consequence of the erratic climate patterns the rainy season started late and the crops that Joyce planted are behind the usual growth pattern, the phenomenon extends the duration of the lean season so by consequence food prices are higher than the average for the season. Joyce received a WFP subsidised plastic silo to store her harvested crops. Through training and coaching and help from fellow farmers who monitor each other to help reduce post-harvest losses by reducing exposure to moisture and deterioration. With the improved post-harvest handling techniques, members of the KOREMU farmers’ cooperative have doubled the produce sold to national markets at each harvest.  In the photo: Joyce and one of her sons working in her maize field.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
RWA_20161107_W....JPG
4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 5081.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District, 7th November 2016  WFP is building on the progress made by the purchase for progress (P4P) initiative in supporting the Ministry of Agriculture to strengthen its ability to assist small-holder farmers’ access to markets, while also enhancing their capacity in post-harvest handling, storage, commodity tracking, and management of the national strategic food reserves.   Joyce 47, has five children. She lives in Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District (Eastern Rwanda). She is a small-scale farmer and is a member of the KOREMU farmer’s organisation (cooperative) that benefits from the technical expertise provided by WFP. The “Murama” farmers’ organisation was established in 2011, accredited by National cooperatives Union. KOREMU counts 350 members, out of which 48.5 percent are women.  As a consequence of the erratic climate patterns the rainy season started late and the crops that Joyce planted are behind the usual growth pattern, the phenomenon extends the duration of the lean season so by consequence food prices are higher than the average for the season. Joyce received a WFP subsidised plastic silo to store her harvested crops. Through training and coaching and help from fellow farmers who monitor each other to help reduce post-harvest losses by reducing exposure to moisture and deterioration. With the improved post-harvest handling techniques, members of the KOREMU farmers’ cooperative have doubled the produce sold to national markets at each harvest.  In the photo: Joyce working in her maize field.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 4643.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District, 7th November 2016  WFP is building on the progress made by the purchase for progress (P4P) initiative in supporting the Ministry of Agriculture to strengthen its ability to assist small-holder farmers’ access to markets, while also enhancing their capacity in post-harvest handling, storage, commodity tracking, and management of the national strategic food reserves.   Joyce 47, has five children. She lives in Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District (Eastern Rwanda). She is a small-scale farmer and is a member of the KOREMU farmer’s organisation (cooperative) that benefits from the technical expertise provided by WFP. The “Murama” farmers’ organisation was established in 2011, accredited by National cooperatives Union. KOREMU counts 350 members, out of which 48.5 percent are women.  As a consequence of the erratic climate patterns the rainy season started late and the crops that Joyce planted are behind the usual growth pattern, the phenomenon extends the duration of the lean season so by consequence food prices are higher than the average for the season. Joyce received a WFP subsidised plastic silo to store her harvested crops. Through training and coaching and help from fellow farmers who monitor each other to help reduce post-harvest losses by reducing exposure to moisture and deterioration. With the improved post-harvest handling techniques, members of the KOREMU farmers’ cooperative have doubled the produce sold to national markets at each harvest.  In the photo: Joyce working in her maize field.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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Rwanda, Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District, 7th November 2016  WFP is building on the progress made by the purchase for progress (P4P) initiative in supporting the Ministry of Agriculture to strengthen its ability to assist small-holder farmers’ access to markets, while also enhancing their capacity in post-harvest handling, storage, commodity tracking, and management of the national strategic food reserves.   Joyce 47, has five children. She lives in Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District (Eastern Rwanda). She is a small-scale farmer and is a member of the KOREMU farmer’s organisation (cooperative) that benefits from the technical expertise provided by WFP. The “Murama” farmers’ organisation was established in 2011, accredited by National cooperatives Union. KOREMU counts 350 members, out of which 48.5 percent are women.  As a consequence of the erratic climate patterns the rainy season started late and the crops that Joyce planted are behind the usual growth pattern, the phenomenon extends the duration of the lean season so by consequence food prices are higher than the average for the season. Joyce received a WFP subsidised plastic silo to store her harvested crops. Through training and coaching and help from fellow farmers who monitor each other to help reduce post-harvest losses by reducing exposure to moisture and deterioration. With the improved post-harvest handling techniques, members of the KOREMU farmers’ cooperative have doubled the produce sold to national markets at each harvest.  In the photo: Joyce working in her maize field.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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Rwanda, Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District, 7th November 2016  WFP is building on the progress made by the purchase for progress (P4P) initiative in supporting the Ministry of Agriculture to strengthen its ability to assist small-holder farmers’ access to markets, while also enhancing their capacity in post-harvest handling, storage, commodity tracking, and management of the national strategic food reserves.   Joyce 47, has five children. She lives in Rukiri village, Gitaraga sector in Ngoma District (Eastern Rwanda). She is a small-scale farmer and is a member of the KOREMU farmer’s organisation (cooperative) that benefits from the technical expertise provided by WFP. The “Murama” farmers’ organisation was established in 2011, accredited by National cooperatives Union. KOREMU counts 350 members, out of which 48.5 percent are women.  As a consequence of the erratic climate patterns the rainy season started late and the crops that Joyce planted are behind the usual growth pattern, the phenomenon extends the duration of the lean season so by consequence food prices are higher than the average for the season. Joyce received a WFP subsidised plastic silo to store her harvested crops. Through training and coaching and help from fellow farmers who monitor each other to help reduce post-harvest losses by reducing exposure to moisture and deterioration. With the improved post-harvest handling techniques, members of the KOREMU farmers’ cooperative have doubled the produce sold to national markets at each harvest.  In the photo: Joyce explains how she will use her plastic silo to store her next maize harvest.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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