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"purchase for progress": 1791 results 

 
Southern Malawi, March 2018  Namangale village - Zomba District,    With Support from the Flemish Government (Flanders), WFP Malawi is connecting 59 small-holder farmers' organisations (FOs) - representing about 34,000 farmers - to markets through the Purchase for Progress (P4P) project.  In the photo: Mary Kandaya Chikopa (Chairperson of Namangale Farmer Organization) “We handle, grade and treat the seeds well to fetch good prices on the market. My family is not at risk of hunger anymore. For the past 4 years I have been having food surplus which I have sold and used the proceeds to help my daughter finish her tertiary education. I have built a good house for my family, I keep livestock and I have money in my bank account”   Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_201803_WFP....JPG
2500 x 1667 px 21.17 x 14.11 cm 3852.00 kb
 
Southern Malawi, March 2018  Namangale village - Zomba District,    With Support from the Flemish Government (Flanders), WFP Malawi is connecting 59 small-holder farmers' organisations (FOs) - representing about 34,000 farmers - to markets through the Purchase for Progress (P4P) project.  In the photo: Mary Kandaya Chikopa (Chairperson of Namangale Farmer Organization) “We handle, grade and treat the seeds well to fetch good prices on the market. My family is not at risk of hunger anymore. For the past 4 years I have been having food surplus which I have sold and used the proceeds to help my daughter finish her tertiary education. I have built a good house for my family, I keep livestock and I have money in my bank account”   Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_201803_WFP....JPG
2500 x 1667 px 21.17 x 14.11 cm 4192.00 kb
 
Southern Malawi, March 2018  Namangale village - Zomba District,    With Support from the Flemish Government (Flanders), WFP Malawi is connecting 59 small-holder farmers' organisations (FOs) - representing about 34,000 farmers - to markets through the Purchase for Progress (P4P) project.  In the photo: Mary Kandaya Chikopa (Chairperson of Namangale Farmer Organization) “We handle, grade and treat the seeds well to fetch good prices on the market. My family is not at risk of hunger anymore. For the past 4 years I have been having food surplus which I have sold and used the proceeds to help my daughter finish her tertiary education. I have built a good house for my family, I keep livestock and I have money in my bank account”   Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_201803_WFP....JPG
2500 x 1667 px 21.17 x 14.11 cm 5551.00 kb
 
Southern Malawi, March 2018  Namangale village - Zomba District,    With Support from the Flemish Government (Flanders), WFP Malawi is connecting 59 small-holder farmers' organisations (FOs) - representing about 34,000 farmers - to markets through the Purchase for Progress (P4P) project.  In the photo: Mary Kandaya Chikopa (Chairperson of Namangale Farmer Organization) “We handle, grade and treat the seeds well to fetch good prices on the market. My family is not at risk of hunger anymore. For the past 4 years I have been having food surplus which I have sold and used the proceeds to help my daughter finish her tertiary education. I have built a good house for my family, I keep livestock and I have money in my bank account”   Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_201803_WFP....JPG
2500 x 1667 px 21.17 x 14.11 cm 4836.00 kb
 
Southern Malawi, March 2018  Namangale village - Zomba District,    With Support from the Flemish Government (Flanders), WFP Malawi is connecting 59 small-holder farmers' organisations (FOs) - representing about 34,000 farmers - to markets through the Purchase for Progress (P4P) project.  In the photo: Mary Kandaya Chikopa (Chairperson of Namangale Farmer Organization) “We handle, grade and treat the seeds well to fetch good prices on the market. My family is not at risk of hunger anymore. For the past 4 years I have been having food surplus which I have sold and used the proceeds to help my daughter finish her tertiary education. I have built a good house for my family, I keep livestock and I have money in my bank account”   Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji Southern Malawi, March 2018  Namangale village - Zomba District,    With Support from the Flemish Government (Flanders), WFP Malawi is connecting 59 small-holder farmers' organisations (FOs) - representing about 34,000 farmers - to markets through the Purchase for Progress (P4P) project.  In the photo: Mary Kandaya Chikopa (Chairperson of Namangale Farmer Organization) “We handle, grade and treat the seeds well to fetch good prices on the market. My family is not at risk of hunger anymore. For the past 4 years I have been having food surplus which I have sold and used the proceeds to help my daughter finish her tertiary education. I have built a good house for my family, I keep livestock and I have money in my bank account”   Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_201803_WFP....JPG
2500 x 1667 px 21.17 x 14.11 cm 2795.00 kb
 
Southern Malawi, March 2018  Namangale village - Zomba District,    With Support from the Flemish Government (Flanders), WFP Malawi is connecting 59 small-holder farmers' organisations (FOs) - representing about 34,000 farmers - to markets through the Purchase for Progress (P4P) project.  In the photo: Mary Kandaya Chikopa (Chairperson of Namangale Farmer Organization) “We handle, grade and treat the seeds well to fetch good prices on the market. My family is not at risk of hunger anymore. For the past 4 years I have been having food surplus which I have sold and used the proceeds to help my daughter finish her tertiary education. I have built a good house for my family, I keep livestock and I have money in my bank account”   Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji Southern Malawi, March 2018  Namangale village - Zomba District,    With Support from the Flemish Government (Flanders), WFP Malawi is connecting 59 small-holder farmers' organisations (FOs) - representing about 34,000 farmers - to markets through the Purchase for Progress (P4P) project.  In the photo: Mary Kandaya Chikopa (Chairperson of Namangale Farmer Organization) “We handle, grade and treat the seeds well to fetch good prices on the market. My family is not at risk of hunger anymore. For the past 4 years I have been having food surplus which I have sold and used the proceeds to help my daughter finish her tertiary education. I have built a good house for my family, I keep livestock and I have money in my bank account”   Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_201803_WFP....JPG
2500 x 1667 px 21.17 x 14.11 cm 2985.00 kb
 
Southern Malawi, March 2018  Namangale village - Zomba District,    With Support from the Flemish Government (Flanders), WFP Malawi is connecting 59 small-holder farmers' organisations (FOs) - representing about 34,000 farmers - to markets through the Purchase for Progress (P4P) project.  In the photo: Mary Kandaya Chikopa (Chairperson of Namangale Farmer Organization) “We handle, grade and treat the seeds well to fetch good prices on the market. My family is not at risk of hunger anymore. For the past 4 years I have been having food surplus which I have sold and used the proceeds to help my daughter finish her tertiary education. I have built a good house for my family, I keep livestock and I have money in my bank account”   Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji Southern Malawi, March 2018  Namangale village - Zomba District,    With Support from the Flemish Government (Flanders), WFP Malawi is connecting 59 small-holder farmers' organisations (FOs) - representing about 34,000 farmers - to markets through the Purchase for Progress (P4P) project.  In the photo: Mary Kandaya Chikopa (Chairperson of Namangale Farmer Organization) “We handle, grade and treat the seeds well to fetch good prices on the market. My family is not at risk of hunger anymore. For the past 4 years I have been having food surplus which I have sold and used the proceeds to help my daughter finish her tertiary education. I have built a good house for my family, I keep livestock and I have money in my bank account”   Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_201803_WFP....JPG
2500 x 1667 px 21.17 x 14.11 cm 3481.00 kb
 
Southern Malawi, March 2018  Namangale village - Zomba District,    With Support from the Flemish Government (Flanders), WFP Malawi is connecting 59 small-holder farmers' organisations (FOs) - representing about 34,000 farmers - to markets through the Purchase for Progress (P4P) project.  In the photo: Mary Kandaya Chikopa (Chairperson of Namangale Farmer Organization) “We handle, grade and treat the seeds well to fetch good prices on the market. My family is not at risk of hunger anymore. For the past 4 years I have been having food surplus which I have sold and used the proceeds to help my daughter finish her tertiary education. I have built a good house for my family, I keep livestock and I have money in my bank account”   Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji Southern Malawi, March 2018  Namangale village - Zomba District,    With Support from the Flemish Government (Flanders), WFP Malawi is connecting 59 small-holder farmers' organisations (FOs) - representing about 34,000 farmers - to markets through the Purchase for Progress (P4P) project.  In the photo: Mary Kandaya Chikopa (Chairperson of Namangale Farmer Organization) “We handle, grade and treat the seeds well to fetch good prices on the market. My family is not at risk of hunger anymore. For the past 4 years I have been having food surplus which I have sold and used the proceeds to help my daughter finish her tertiary education. I have built a good house for my family, I keep livestock and I have money in my bank account”   Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_201803_WFP....JPG
2500 x 1667 px 21.17 x 14.11 cm 3262.00 kb
 
Southern Malawi, March 2018  Namangale village - Zomba District,    With Support from the Flemish Government (Flanders), WFP Malawi is connecting 59 small-holder farmers' organisations (FOs) - representing about 34,000 farmers - to markets through the Purchase for Progress (P4P) project.  In the photo: Mary Kandaya Chikopa (Chairperson of Namangale Farmer Organization) “We handle, grade and treat the seeds well to fetch good prices on the market. My family is not at risk of hunger anymore. For the past 4 years I have been having food surplus which I have sold and used the proceeds to help my daughter finish her tertiary education. I have built a good house for my family, I keep livestock and I have money in my bank account”   Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji Southern Malawi, March 2018  Namangale village - Zomba District,    With Support from the Flemish Government (Flanders), WFP Malawi is connecting 59 small-holder farmers' organisations (FOs) - representing about 34,000 farmers - to markets through the Purchase for Progress (P4P) project.  In the photo: Mary Kandaya Chikopa (Chairperson of Namangale Farmer Organization) “We handle, grade and treat the seeds well to fetch good prices on the market. My family is not at risk of hunger anymore. For the past 4 years I have been having food surplus which I have sold and used the proceeds to help my daughter finish her tertiary education. I have built a good house for my family, I keep livestock and I have money in my bank account”   Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_201803_WFP....JPG
2500 x 1727 px 21.17 x 14.62 cm 4618.00 kb
 
Southern Malawi, March 2018  Namangale village - Zomba District,    With Support from the Flemish Government (Flanders), WFP Malawi is connecting 59 small-holder farmers' organisations (FOs) - representing about 34,000 farmers - to markets through the Purchase for Progress (P4P) project.  In the photo: Mary Kandaya Chikopa (Chairperson of Namangale Farmer Organization) “We handle, grade and treat the seeds well to fetch good prices on the market. My family is not at risk of hunger anymore. For the past 4 years I have been having food surplus which I have sold and used the proceeds to help my daughter finish her tertiary education. I have built a good house for my family, I keep livestock and I have money in my bank account”   Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji Southern Malawi, March 2018  Namangale village - Zomba District,    With Support from the Flemish Government (Flanders), WFP Malawi is connecting 59 small-holder farmers' organisations (FOs) - representing about 34,000 farmers - to markets through the Purchase for Progress (P4P) project.  In the photo: Mary Kandaya Chikopa (Chairperson of Namangale Farmer Organization) “We handle, grade and treat the seeds well to fetch good prices on the market. My family is not at risk of hunger anymore. For the past 4 years I have been having food surplus which I have sold and used the proceeds to help my daughter finish her tertiary education. I have built a good house for my family, I keep livestock and I have money in my bank account”   Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_201803_WFP....JPG
2500 x 1667 px 21.17 x 14.11 cm 3674.00 kb
 
Southern Malawi, March 2018  Namangale village - Zomba District,    With Support from the Flemish Government (Flanders), WFP Malawi is connecting 59 small-holder farmers' organisations (FOs) - representing about 34,000 farmers - to markets through the Purchase for Progress (P4P) project.  In the photo: Mary Kandaya Chikopa (Chairperson of Namangale Farmer Organization) “We handle, grade and treat the seeds well to fetch good prices on the market. My family is not at risk of hunger anymore. For the past 4 years I have been having food surplus which I have sold and used the proceeds to help my daughter finish her tertiary education. I have built a good house for my family, I keep livestock and I have money in my bank account”   Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji Southern Malawi, March 2018  Namangale village - Zomba District,    With Support from the Flemish Government (Flanders), WFP Malawi is connecting 59 small-holder farmers' organisations (FOs) - representing about 34,000 farmers - to markets through the Purchase for Progress (P4P) project.  In the photo: Mary Kandaya Chikopa (Chairperson of Namangale Farmer Organization) “We handle, grade and treat the seeds well to fetch good prices on the market. My family is not at risk of hunger anymore. For the past 4 years I have been having food surplus which I have sold and used the proceeds to help my daughter finish her tertiary education. I have built a good house for my family, I keep livestock and I have money in my bank account”   Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_201803_WFP....JPG
2500 x 1667 px 21.17 x 14.11 cm 3239.00 kb
 
Southern Malawi, March 2018  Namangale village - Zomba District,    With Support from the Flemish Government (Flanders), WFP Malawi is connecting 59 small-holder farmers' organisations (FOs) - representing about 34,000 farmers - to markets through the Purchase for Progress (P4P) project.  In the photo: Mary Kandaya Chikopa (Chairperson of Namangale Farmer Organization) “We handle, grade and treat the seeds well to fetch good prices on the market. My family is not at risk of hunger anymore. For the past 4 years I have been having food surplus which I have sold and used the proceeds to help my daughter finish her tertiary education. I have built a good house for my family, I keep livestock and I have money in my bank account”   Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji Southern Malawi, March 2018  Namangale village - Zomba District,    With Support from the Flemish Government (Flanders), WFP Malawi is connecting 59 small-holder farmers' organisations (FOs) - representing about 34,000 farmers - to markets through the Purchase for Progress (P4P) project.  In the photo: Mary Kandaya Chikopa (Chairperson of Namangale Farmer Organization) “We handle, grade and treat the seeds well to fetch good prices on the market. My family is not at risk of hunger anymore. For the past 4 years I have been having food surplus which I have sold and used the proceeds to help my daughter finish her tertiary education. I have built a good house for my family, I keep livestock and I have money in my bank account”   Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_201803_WFP....JPG
2500 x 1667 px 21.17 x 14.11 cm 3400.00 kb
 
Southern Malawi, March 2018  Namangale village - Zomba District,    With Support from the Flemish Government (Flanders), WFP Malawi is connecting 59 small-holder farmers' organisations (FOs) - representing about 34,000 farmers - to markets through the Purchase for Progress (P4P) project.  In the photo: Mary Kandaya Chikopa (Chairperson of Namangale Farmer Organization) “We handle, grade and treat the seeds well to fetch good prices on the market. My family is not at risk of hunger anymore. For the past 4 years I have been having food surplus which I have sold and used the proceeds to help my daughter finish her tertiary education. I have built a good house for my family, I keep livestock and I have money in my bank account”   Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_201803_WFP....JPG
2500 x 1667 px 21.17 x 14.11 cm 3632.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Maiduguri, Borno State, 13 March 2018  Calvin Apire is from the northern district of Kitgum in Uganda. He attended secondary school at St. Joseph’s College Layibi in nearby Gulu District, where between 1984 and 1986, he participated in the ‘School Garden Programme’, which was linked to the World Food Programme (WFP)’s school meals intervention.  As a member of the school’s Young Farmers Association, Calvin learned how to grow maize and beans to support the food needs of his school. WFP supplemented their efforts by providing additional nutritious foods, such as canned fish, chicken and beef, as well as powdered milk, sugar, and rice.  “Receiving nutritious food was a strong incentive for me to stay in school and focus on learning. It was only at school that I could get that standard of food,” says Calvin. “There are many children around the world that fail to pursue effective learning because they either don’t have anything or enough to eat.”  After completing secondary school, and at the onset of a decades-long conflict in northern Uganda, Calvin turned to small scale farming. To this day, he maintains a small farm that yields produce for his wife and three children. “When school feeding is well executed, it serves as an engine that positively drives the future of a country,” Calvin says.  In 2000 as the conflict intensified, and the need for humanitarian assistance in northern Uganda increased, Calvin’s earlier exposure to WFP’s school feeding programme fuelled his resolve to join the organization’s efforts. He started with WFP in October of that year, as a Procurement Assistant.  “There is nothing as exciting as working for the World Food Programme… I get to meet the people we serve and see how happy they are about what we do, which gives me all the satisfaction I need.”  “WFP’s school feeding programme also imbibed humanitarian values in me. I started to recognise the importance of giving hope to the vulnerable,” says Calvin who is currently Procurement Officer within the Supply Chain Unit at WFP in Nigeria.  Throughout the course of his career, he has supported the organization in buying food in emergency situations and has connected smallholder farmers with markets through Purchase for Progress (P4P) in countries including Liberia, Afghanistan, and South Africa, among many others. “I enjoy working in Supply Chain because I like seeing the effective and efficient movement of food assistance from the source to the beneficiaries,” says Calvin.  “I thank WFP for the impact the organization had in my life as a school child and for later giving me the opportunity to play a role in saving and changing lives. There is nothing as exciting as working for the World Food Programme… I get to meet the people we serve and see how happy they are about what we do, which gives me all the satisfaction I need,” says Calvin.  In the Photo: Calvin visiting retailers in Maiduguri, Nigeria.  Photo: WFP/ Ladi Eguche
NIR_20180313_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 158.75 x 105.83 cm 2588.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Maiduguri, Borno State, 13 March 2018  Calvin Apire is from the northern district of Kitgum in Uganda. He attended secondary school at St. Joseph’s College Layibi in nearby Gulu District, where between 1984 and 1986, he participated in the ‘School Garden Programme’, which was linked to the World Food Programme (WFP)’s school meals intervention.  As a member of the school’s Young Farmers Association, Calvin learned how to grow maize and beans to support the food needs of his school. WFP supplemented their efforts by providing additional nutritious foods, such as canned fish, chicken and beef, as well as powdered milk, sugar, and rice.  “Receiving nutritious food was a strong incentive for me to stay in school and focus on learning. It was only at school that I could get that standard of food,” says Calvin. “There are many children around the world that fail to pursue effective learning because they either don’t have anything or enough to eat.”  After completing secondary school, and at the onset of a decades-long conflict in northern Uganda, Calvin turned to small scale farming. To this day, he maintains a small farm that yields produce for his wife and three children. “When school feeding is well executed, it serves as an engine that positively drives the future of a country,” Calvin says.  In 2000 as the conflict intensified, and the need for humanitarian assistance in northern Uganda increased, Calvin’s earlier exposure to WFP’s school feeding programme fuelled his resolve to join the organization’s efforts. He started with WFP in October of that year, as a Procurement Assistant.  “There is nothing as exciting as working for the World Food Programme… I get to meet the people we serve and see how happy they are about what we do, which gives me all the satisfaction I need.”  “WFP’s school feeding programme also imbibed humanitarian values in me. I started to recognise the importance of giving hope to the vulnerable,” says Calvin who is currently Procurement Officer within the Supply Chain Unit at WFP in Nigeria.  Throughout the course of his career, he has supported the organization in buying food in emergency situations and has connected smallholder farmers with markets through Purchase for Progress (P4P) in countries including Liberia, Afghanistan, and South Africa, among many others. “I enjoy working in Supply Chain because I like seeing the effective and efficient movement of food assistance from the source to the beneficiaries,” says Calvin.  “I thank WFP for the impact the organization had in my life as a school child and for later giving me the opportunity to play a role in saving and changing lives. There is nothing as exciting as working for the World Food Programme… I get to meet the people we serve and see how happy they are about what we do, which gives me all the satisfaction I need,” says Calvin.  In the Photo: Calvin visiting retailers in Maiduguri, Nigeria.  Photo: WFP/ Ladi Eguche
NIR_20180313_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 158.75 x 105.83 cm 3956.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Maiduguri, Borno State, 13 March 2018  Calvin Apire is from the northern district of Kitgum in Uganda. He attended secondary school at St. Joseph’s College Layibi in nearby Gulu District, where between 1984 and 1986, he participated in the ‘School Garden Programme’, which was linked to the World Food Programme (WFP)’s school meals intervention.  As a member of the school’s Young Farmers Association, Calvin learned how to grow maize and beans to support the food needs of his school. WFP supplemented their efforts by providing additional nutritious foods, such as canned fish, chicken and beef, as well as powdered milk, sugar, and rice.  “Receiving nutritious food was a strong incentive for me to stay in school and focus on learning. It was only at school that I could get that standard of food,” says Calvin. “There are many children around the world that fail to pursue effective learning because they either don’t have anything or enough to eat.”  After completing secondary school, and at the onset of a decades-long conflict in northern Uganda, Calvin turned to small scale farming. To this day, he maintains a small farm that yields produce for his wife and three children. “When school feeding is well executed, it serves as an engine that positively drives the future of a country,” Calvin says.  In 2000 as the conflict intensified, and the need for humanitarian assistance in northern Uganda increased, Calvin’s earlier exposure to WFP’s school feeding programme fuelled his resolve to join the organization’s efforts. He started with WFP in October of that year, as a Procurement Assistant.  “There is nothing as exciting as working for the World Food Programme… I get to meet the people we serve and see how happy they are about what we do, which gives me all the satisfaction I need.”  “WFP’s school feeding programme also imbibed humanitarian values in me. I started to recognise the importance of giving hope to the vulnerable,” says Calvin who is currently Procurement Officer within the Supply Chain Unit at WFP in Nigeria.  Throughout the course of his career, he has supported the organization in buying food in emergency situations and has connected smallholder farmers with markets through Purchase for Progress (P4P) in countries including Liberia, Afghanistan, and South Africa, among many others. “I enjoy working in Supply Chain because I like seeing the effective and efficient movement of food assistance from the source to the beneficiaries,” says Calvin.  “I thank WFP for the impact the organization had in my life as a school child and for later giving me the opportunity to play a role in saving and changing lives. There is nothing as exciting as working for the World Food Programme… I get to meet the people we serve and see how happy they are about what we do, which gives me all the satisfaction I need,” says Calvin.  In the Photo: Calvin visiting retailers in Maiduguri, Nigeria.  Photo: WFP/ Ladi Eguche
NIR_20180313_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 158.75 x 105.83 cm 3144.00 kb
 
Nigeria, Maiduguri, Borno State, 13 March 2018  Calvin Apire is from the northern district of Kitgum in Uganda. He attended secondary school at St. Joseph’s College Layibi in nearby Gulu District, where between 1984 and 1986, he participated in the ‘School Garden Programme’, which was linked to the World Food Programme (WFP)’s school meals intervention.  As a member of the school’s Young Farmers Association, Calvin learned how to grow maize and beans to support the food needs of his school. WFP supplemented their efforts by providing additional nutritious foods, such as canned fish, chicken and beef, as well as powdered milk, sugar, and rice.  “Receiving nutritious food was a strong incentive for me to stay in school and focus on learning. It was only at school that I could get that standard of food,” says Calvin. “There are many children around the world that fail to pursue effective learning because they either don’t have anything or enough to eat.”  After completing secondary school, and at the onset of a decades-long conflict in northern Uganda, Calvin turned to small scale farming. To this day, he maintains a small farm that yields produce for his wife and three children. “When school feeding is well executed, it serves as an engine that positively drives the future of a country,” Calvin says.  In 2000 as the conflict intensified, and the need for humanitarian assistance in northern Uganda increased, Calvin’s earlier exposure to WFP’s school feeding programme fuelled his resolve to join the organization’s efforts. He started with WFP in October of that year, as a Procurement Assistant.  “There is nothing as exciting as working for the World Food Programme… I get to meet the people we serve and see how happy they are about what we do, which gives me all the satisfaction I need.”  “WFP’s school feeding programme also imbibed humanitarian values in me. I started to recognise the importance of giving hope to the vulnerable,” says Calvin who is currently Procurement Officer within the Supply Chain Unit at WFP in Nigeria.  Throughout the course of his career, he has supported the organization in buying food in emergency situations and has connected smallholder farmers with markets through Purchase for Progress (P4P) in countries including Liberia, Afghanistan, and South Africa, among many others. “I enjoy working in Supply Chain because I like seeing the effective and efficient movement of food assistance from the source to the beneficiaries,” says Calvin.  “I thank WFP for the impact the organization had in my life as a school child and for later giving me the opportunity to play a role in saving and changing lives. There is nothing as exciting as working for the World Food Programme… I get to meet the people we serve and see how happy they are about what we do, which gives me all the satisfaction I need,” says Calvin.  In the Photo: Calvin visiting retailers in Maiduguri, Nigeria.  Photo: WFP/ Ladi Eguche
NIR_20180313_W....JPG
3984 x 2656 px 140.55 x 93.70 cm 1816.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Bunyangula, North Kivu. 24 February 2018.  Home Grown School Feeding (HGSF) and Purchase for Progress (P4P) programmes are complementary interventions in approaching conflict and hunger in DRC.  HGSF focuses on reducing hunger and malnutrition triggered by unrest in schools of the Rutshuru territory.   Jointly implemented by WFP and FAO, P4P helps to increase sustainable agriculture for people returning to their village after years of displacements and armed conflict. Variable portion of food produced by P4P beneficiaries is bought by WFP and distributed to 27 000 children from schools supported by the Home Grown School Feeding programme.  In the Photo: Participants in a WFP supported "Purchase for Progress” (P4P) program in Bunynagula prepare maize for sale to WFP. Under P4P, WFP procures food for its Home Grown School Meals programme from local smallholder farmers, many of them women, in order to help strengthen the livelihoods of farmers and the local value chains.  Photo: WFP/Tara Crossley
DRC_20180224_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 69.90 x 46.60 cm 33649.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Bunyangula, North Kivu. 24 February 2018.  Home Grown School Feeding (HGSF) and Purchase for Progress (P4P) programmes are complementary interventions in approaching conflict and hunger in DRC.  HGSF focuses on reducing hunger and malnutrition triggered by unrest in schools of the Rutshuru territory.   Jointly implemented by WFP and FAO, P4P helps to increase sustainable agriculture for people returning to their village after years of displacements and armed conflict. Variable portion of food produced by P4P beneficiaries is bought by WFP and distributed to 27 000 children from schools supported by the Home Grown School Feeding programme.  In the Photo: Participants in a WFP supported "Purchase for Progress” (P4P) program in Bunynagula prepare maize for sale to WFP. Under P4P, WFP procures food for its Home Grown School Meals programme from local smallholder farmers, many of them women, in order to help strengthen the livelihoods of farmers and the local value chains.  Photo: WFP/Tara Crossley
DRC_20180224_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 69.90 x 46.60 cm 35082.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Bunyangula, North Kivu. 24 February 2018.  Home Grown School Feeding (HGSF) and Purchase for Progress (P4P) programmes are complementary interventions in approaching conflict and hunger in DRC.  HGSF focuses on reducing hunger and malnutrition triggered by unrest in schools of the Rutshuru territory.   Jointly implemented by WFP and FAO, P4P helps to increase sustainable agriculture for people returning to their village after years of displacements and armed conflict. Variable portion of food produced by P4P beneficiaries is bought by WFP and distributed to 27 000 children from schools supported by the Home Grown School Feeding programme.  In the Photo: Participants in a WFP supported "Purchase for Progress” (P4P) program in Bunynagula prepare maize for sale to WFP. Under P4P, WFP procures food for its Home Grown School Meals programme from local smallholder farmers, many of them women, in order to help strengthen the livelihoods of farmers and the local value chains.  Photo: WFP/Tara Crossley
DRC_20180224_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 69.90 x 46.60 cm 43921.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Bunyangula, North Kivu. 24 February 2018.  Home Grown School Feeding (HGSF) and Purchase for Progress (P4P) programmes are complementary interventions in approaching conflict and hunger in DRC.  HGSF focuses on reducing hunger and malnutrition triggered by unrest in schools of the Rutshuru territory.   Jointly implemented by WFP and FAO, P4P helps to increase sustainable agriculture for people returning to their village after years of displacements and armed conflict. Variable portion of food produced by P4P beneficiaries is bought by WFP and distributed to 27 000 children from schools supported by the Home Grown School Feeding programme.  In the Photo: Participants in a WFP supported "Purchase for Progress” (P4P) program in Bunynagula prepare maize for sale to WFP. Under P4P, WFP procures food for its Home Grown School Meals programme from local smallholder farmers, many of them women, in order to help strengthen the livelihoods of farmers and the local value chains.  Photo: WFP/Tara Crossley
DRC_20180224_W....JPG
8256 x 5504 px 69.90 x 46.60 cm 38417.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Bunyangula, North Kivu. 24 February 2018.  Home Grown School Feeding (HGSF) and Purchase for Progress (P4P) programmes are complementary interventions in approaching conflict and hunger in DRC.  HGSF focuses on reducing hunger and malnutrition triggered by unrest in schools of the Rutshuru territory.   Jointly implemented by WFP and FAO, P4P helps to increase sustainable agriculture for people returning to their village after years of displacements and armed conflict. Variable portion of food produced by P4P beneficiaries is bought by WFP and distributed to 27 000 children from schools supported by the Home Grown School Feeding programme.  In the Photo: Participants in a WFP supported "Purchase for Progress” (P4P) program in Bunynagula prepare maize for sale to WFP. Under P4P, WFP procures food for its Home Grown School Meals programme from local smallholder farmers, many of them women, in order to help strengthen the livelihoods of farmers and the local value chains.  Photo: WFP/Tara Crossley
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Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Bunyangula, North Kivu. 24 February 2018.  Home Grown School Feeding (HGSF) and Purchase for Progress (P4P) programmes are complementary interventions in approaching conflict and hunger in DRC.  HGSF focuses on reducing hunger and malnutrition triggered by unrest in schools of the Rutshuru territory.   Jointly implemented by WFP and FAO, P4P helps to increase sustainable agriculture for people returning to their village after years of displacements and armed conflict. Variable portion of food produced by P4P beneficiaries is bought by WFP and distributed to 27 000 children from schools supported by the Home Grown School Feeding programme.  In the Photo: Participants in a WFP supported "Purchase for Progress” (P4P) program in Bunynagula prepare maize for sale to WFP. Under P4P, WFP procures food for its Home Grown School Meals programme from local smallholder farmers, many of them women, in order to help strengthen the livelihoods of farmers and the local value chains.  Photo: WFP/Tara Crossley
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Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Bunyangula, North Kivu. 24 February 2018.  Home Grown School Feeding (HGSF) and Purchase for Progress (P4P) programmes are complementary interventions in approaching conflict and hunger in DRC.  HGSF focuses on reducing hunger and malnutrition triggered by unrest in schools of the Rutshuru territory.   Jointly implemented by WFP and FAO, P4P helps to increase sustainable agriculture for people returning to their village after years of displacements and armed conflict. Variable portion of food produced by P4P beneficiaries is bought by WFP and distributed to 27 000 children from schools supported by the Home Grown School Feeding programme.  In the Photo: Participants in a WFP supported "Purchase for Progress” (P4P) program in Bunynagula prepare maize for sale to WFP. Under P4P, WFP procures food for its Home Grown School Meals programme from local smallholder farmers, many of them women, in order to help strengthen the livelihoods of farmers and the local value chains.  Photo: WFP/Tara Crossley
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Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Bunyangula, North Kivu. 24 February 2018.  Home Grown School Feeding (HGSF) and Purchase for Progress (P4P) programmes are complementary interventions in approaching conflict and hunger in DRC.  HGSF focuses on reducing hunger and malnutrition triggered by unrest in schools of the Rutshuru territory.   Jointly implemented by WFP and FAO, P4P helps to increase sustainable agriculture for people returning to their village after years of displacements and armed conflict. Variable portion of food produced by P4P beneficiaries is bought by WFP and distributed to 27 000 children from schools supported by the Home Grown School Feeding programme.  In the Photo: Participants in a WFP supported "Purchase for Progress” (P4P) program in Bunynagula prepare maize for sale to WFP. Under P4P, WFP procures food for its Home Grown School Meals programme from local smallholder farmers, many of them women, in order to help strengthen the livelihoods of farmers and the local value chains.  Photo: WFP/Tara Crossley
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