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"purchase for progress": 1723 results 

 
Central African Republic. Bangui. 6 October 2017.  The Central African Republic has the second-to-lowest level of human development in the world. Rebel groups control parts of the country, which continues to experience sporadic surges of violence against the backdrop of a disintegrating state.  WFP’s Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme connects smallholder farmers to markets, giving them an opportunity to grow their businesses and improve their lives and those of their entire communities.  In the Photo: Facade of the Laboratory of Biological and Agronomic Sciences for Development (LASBAD).  Photo: WFP/Bruno Djoyo
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5760 x 3240 px 48.77 x 27.43 cm 11219.00 kb
 
Central African Republic. Bouar, Nana-Mambéré. 5 October 2017.  The Central African Republic has the second-to-lowest level of human development in the world. Rebel groups control parts of the country, which continues to experience sporadic surges of violence against the backdrop of a disintegrating state.  WFP’s Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme connects smallholder farmers to markets, giving them an opportunity to grow their businesses and improve their lives and those of their entire communities.  In the Photo: Members of the National Coordination of Christian Women of Central Africa - Bouar.  Photo: WFP/Bruno Djoyo
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 16638.00 kb
 
Central African Republic. Bouar, Nana-Mambéré. 4 October 2017.  The Central African Republic has the second-to-lowest level of human development in the world. Rebel groups control parts of the country, which continues to experience sporadic surges of violence against the backdrop of a disintegrating state.  WFP’s Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme connects smallholder farmers to markets, giving them an opportunity to grow their businesses and improve their lives and those of their entire communities.  In the Photo: View of downtown Bouar (City located 452 km northwest of the Central African Republic capital Bangui).  Photo: WFP/Bruno Djoyo
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 14007.00 kb
 
Central African Republic. Paoua, Ouham-Pendé. 1 October 2017.  The Central African Republic has the second-to-lowest level of human development in the world. Rebel groups control parts of the country, which continues to experience sporadic surges of violence against the backdrop of a disintegrating state.  WFP’s Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme connects smallholder farmers to markets, giving them an opportunity to grow their businesses and improve their lives and those of their entire communities.  In the Photo: Kévin Pierre Panengah, Programme Associate.  Photo: WFP/Bruno Djoyo
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 9456.00 kb
 
Central African Republic. Paoua, Ouham-Pendé. 1 October 2017.  The Central African Republic has the second-to-lowest level of human development in the world. Rebel groups control parts of the country, which continues to experience sporadic surges of violence against the backdrop of a disintegrating state.  WFP’s Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme connects smallholder farmers to markets, giving them an opportunity to grow their businesses and improve their lives and those of their entire communities.  In the Photo: Séverin Apayaka, Monitoring Assistant - Paoua's sub-office.  Photo: WFP/Bruno Djoyo
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 10328.00 kb
 
Central African Republic. Paoua, Ouham-Pendé. 1 October 2017.  The Central African Republic has the second-to-lowest level of human development in the world. Rebel groups control parts of the country, which continues to experience sporadic surges of violence against the backdrop of a disintegrating state.  WFP’s Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme connects smallholder farmers to markets, giving them an opportunity to grow their businesses and improve their lives and those of their entire communities.  In the Photo: Séverin Apayaka, Monitoring Assistant - Paoua's sub-office.  Photo: WFP/Bruno Djoyo
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 9238.00 kb
 
Central African Republic. Paoua, Ouham-Pendé. 1 October 2017.  The Central African Republic has the second-to-lowest level of human development in the world. Rebel groups control parts of the country, which continues to experience sporadic surges of violence against the backdrop of a disintegrating state.  WFP’s Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme connects smallholder farmers to markets, giving them an opportunity to grow their businesses and improve their lives and those of their entire communities.  In the Photo: Sorghum seller at the Paoua Market.  Photo: WFP/Bruno Djoyo
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 12245.00 kb
 
Central African Republic. Paoua, Ouham-Pendé. 1 October 2017.  The Central African Republic has the second-to-lowest level of human development in the world. Rebel groups control parts of the country, which continues to experience sporadic surges of violence against the backdrop of a disintegrating state.  WFP’s Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme connects smallholder farmers to markets, giving them an opportunity to grow their businesses and improve their lives and those of their entire communities.  In the Photo: Sorghum seller at the Paoua Market.  Photo: WFP/Bruno Djoyo
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 12911.00 kb
 
Central African Republic. Paoua, Ouham-Pendé. 1 October 2017.  The Central African Republic has the second-to-lowest level of human development in the world. Rebel groups control parts of the country, which continues to experience sporadic surges of violence against the backdrop of a disintegrating state.  WFP’s Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme connects smallholder farmers to markets, giving them an opportunity to grow their businesses and improve their lives and those of their entire communities.  In the Photo: Sorghum seller at the Paoua Market.  Photo: WFP/Bruno Djoyo
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5760 x 3240 px 48.77 x 27.43 cm 11232.00 kb
 
Central African Republic. Paoua, Ouham-Pendé. 1 October 2017.  The Central African Republic has the second-to-lowest level of human development in the world. Rebel groups control parts of the country, which continues to experience sporadic surges of violence against the backdrop of a disintegrating state.  WFP’s Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme connects smallholder farmers to markets, giving them an opportunity to grow their businesses and improve their lives and those of their entire communities.  In the Photo: Sorghum seller at the Paoua Market.  Photo: WFP/Bruno Djoyo
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 11931.00 kb
 
Central African Republic. Paoua, Ouham-Pendé. 1 October 2017.  The Central African Republic has the second-to-lowest level of human development in the world. Rebel groups control parts of the country, which continues to experience sporadic surges of violence against the backdrop of a disintegrating state.  WFP’s Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme connects smallholder farmers to markets, giving them an opportunity to grow their businesses and improve their lives and those of their entire communities.  In the Photo: Sorghum seller at the Paoua Market.  Photo: WFP/Bruno Djoyo
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 11831.00 kb
 
Central African Republic. Paoua, Ouham-Pendé. 1 October 2017.  The Central African Republic has the second-to-lowest level of human development in the world. Rebel groups control parts of the country, which continues to experience sporadic surges of violence against the backdrop of a disintegrating state.  WFP’s Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme connects smallholder farmers to markets, giving them an opportunity to grow their businesses and improve their lives and those of their entire communities.  In the Photo: Sorghum seller at the Paoua Market.  Photo: WFP/Bruno Djoyo
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 11210.00 kb
 
Central African Republic. Paoua, Ouham-Pendé. 1 October 2017.  The Central African Republic has the second-to-lowest level of human development in the world. Rebel groups control parts of the country, which continues to experience sporadic surges of violence against the backdrop of a disintegrating state.  WFP’s Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme connects smallholder farmers to markets, giving them an opportunity to grow their businesses and improve their lives and those of their entire communities.  In the Photo: Sorghum seller at the Paoua Market.  Photo: WFP/Bruno Djoyo
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 9278.00 kb
 
Central African Republic. Paoua, Ouham-Pendé. 30 September 2017.  The Central African Republic has the second-to-lowest level of human development in the world. Rebel groups control parts of the country, which continues to experience sporadic surges of violence against the backdrop of a disintegrating state.  WFP’s Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme connects smallholder farmers to markets, giving them an opportunity to grow their businesses and improve their lives and those of their entire communities.  In the Photo: The talented Claudia Ziranone is a P4P Beneficiary in the city of Paoua - "The activities of P4P encourage me to cultivate and better organize myself as president of the Nzando group ". Today I am so proud to take care of myself and my husband respects me even more because he knows that I have money. This year, I was able to enroll my 6 children in school thanks to the profits that I was able to make from the sale of my bags of sorghum to WFP.  Photo: WFP/Bruno Djoyo
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 8890.00 kb
 
Central African Republic. Paoua, Ouham-Pendé. 30 September 2017.  The Central African Republic has the second-to-lowest level of human development in the world. Rebel groups control parts of the country, which continues to experience sporadic surges of violence against the backdrop of a disintegrating state.  WFP’s Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme connects smallholder farmers to markets, giving them an opportunity to grow their businesses and improve their lives and those of their entire communities.  In the Photo: The talented Claudia Ziranone is a P4P Beneficiary in the city of Paoua - "The activities of P4P encourage me to cultivate and better organize myself as president of the Nzando group ". Today I am so proud to take care of myself and my husband respects me even more because he knows that I have money. This year, I was able to enroll my 6 children in school thanks to the profits that I was able to make from the sale of my bags of sorghum to WFP.  Photo: WFP/Bruno Djoyo
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 9481.00 kb
 
Central African Republic. Paoua, Ouham-Pendé. 30 September 2017.  The Central African Republic has the second-to-lowest level of human development in the world. Rebel groups control parts of the country, which continues to experience sporadic surges of violence against the backdrop of a disintegrating state.  WFP’s Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme connects smallholder farmers to markets, giving them an opportunity to grow their businesses and improve their lives and those of their entire communities.  In the Photo: Claudia Ziranone - President of the Nzando Group working with other small farmers in the city of Paoua. "Since WFP started supporting us, we have been very relieved, we are able to cope with some of our difficulties."  Photo: WFP/Bruno Djoyo
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 11359.00 kb
 
Central African Republic. Paoua, Ouham-Pendé. 30 September 2017.  The Central African Republic has the second-to-lowest level of human development in the world. Rebel groups control parts of the country, which continues to experience sporadic surges of violence against the backdrop of a disintegrating state.  WFP’s Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme connects smallholder farmers to markets, giving them an opportunity to grow their businesses and improve their lives and those of their entire communities.  In the Photo: Claudia Ziranone - President of the Nzando Group working with other small farmers in the city of Paoua. "Since WFP started supporting us, we have been very relieved, we are able to cope with some of our difficulties."  Photo: WFP/Bruno Djoyo
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5760 x 3840 px 48.77 x 32.51 cm 13188.00 kb
 
Central African Republic. Paoua, Ouham-Pendé. 30 September 2017.  The Central African Republic has the second-to-lowest level of human development in the world. Rebel groups control parts of the country, which continues to experience sporadic surges of violence against the backdrop of a disintegrating state.  WFP’s Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme connects smallholder farmers to markets, giving them an opportunity to grow their businesses and improve their lives and those of their entire communities.  In the Photo: Members of the Paoua cooperative filling bags of sorghum.  Photo: WFP/Bruno Djoyo
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5760 x 3240 px 48.77 x 27.43 cm 10821.00 kb
 
Central African Republic. Paoua, Ouham-Pendé. 30 September 2017.  The Central African Republic has the second-to-lowest level of human development in the world. Rebel groups control parts of the country, which continues to experience sporadic surges of violence against the backdrop of a disintegrating state.  WFP’s Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme connects smallholder farmers to markets, giving them an opportunity to grow their businesses and improve their lives and those of their entire communities.  In the Photo: External view of the most structured Cooperative of Paoua (Located in the center of the prefecture of Ouham-Pendé, the city of Paoua is 510 km from Bangui) and the members of the cooperative filling sacks of sorghum.  Photo: WFP/Bruno Djoyo
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5760 x 3240 px 48.77 x 27.43 cm 11715.00 kb
 
Central African Republic. Bangui. 10 March 2017.  The Central African Republic has the second-to-lowest level of human development in the world. Rebel groups control parts of the country, which continues to experience sporadic surges of violence against the backdrop of a disintegrating state.  WFP’s Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme connects smallholder farmers to markets, giving them an opportunity to grow their businesses and improve their lives and those of their entire communities.  In the Photo: Sylvie Yakanadji - President of the National Coordination of Christian Women of Central Africa - Bouar (City located 452 km north-west of the Central African capital Bangui).   "The P4P project has been very beneficial for me, as well as to vulnerable women, especially financially. Thanks to the profits from the sale of our crops to the WFP through the P4P, I was able to build my house, buy trucks (10 wheels, 6 wheels) and pickups to help me in my agricultural activities. We have 10 hectares on which we have grown red beans this year. We have already sold 27 tons of red beans to WFP.  Photo: WFP/Bruno Djoyo
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 6091.00 kb
 
Zambia, Chimpili, 11 October 2015  In Zambia, the smallholder farmers of Chimpili Cooperative are benefiting from joint support from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and the World Food Programme (WFP). With comprehensive supply-side support, improved infrastructure and market access, cooperative members are now growing sustainable businesses.   Harriet Chabala has increased her production of beans by 50 percent over the last two years. Based on her entrepreneurial skills and consistent supply to WFP for the last three marketing seasons, she received an equipment loan from the cooperative for a tricycle. The tricycle can navigate poor quality roads, enabling Harriet to provide transport services to move crops, inputs and people to and from towns and markets.   In the photo: Harriet Chabala poses with the tricycle she acquired with a loan from Chimpili Cooperative.   Photo: WFP/Evin Joyce
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5184 x 3456 px 182.88 x 121.92 cm 7162.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo, North Kivu Province, 02 December 2016  Since 2010 WFP has been strengthening smallholder farmers’ capacity to produce and trade through a Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme run with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). P4P includes trainings on agricultural techniques and organization, literacy to promote women’s role in the communities, construction of agricultural infrastructure and roads rehabilitation. It also enables farmers to connect with markets and traders, and engage in commodity bulking and collective marketing. In 2016 P4P expanded to North Kivu province.  In the photo: WFP DRC Country Director Claude Jibidar vists a new Purchase for Progress programme launched in North Kivu in early 2016. 250 women who participated in a literacy programme received sewing machines.   Photo: WFP/Jacques David
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5244.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo, North Kivu Province, 02 December 2016  Since 2010 WFP has been strengthening smallholder farmers’ capacity to produce and trade through a Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme run with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). P4P includes trainings on agricultural techniques and organization, literacy to promote women’s role in the communities, construction of agricultural infrastructure and roads rehabilitation. It also enables farmers to connect with markets and traders, and engage in commodity bulking and collective marketing. In 2016 P4P expanded to North Kivu province.  In the photo: WFP DRC Country Director Claude Jibidar vists a new Purchase for Progress programme launched in North Kivu in early 2016. 250 women who participated in a literacy programme received sewing machines.   Photo: WFP/Jacques David
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 5081.00 kb
 
Democratic Republic of the Congo, North Kivu Province, 02 December 2016  Since 2010 WFP has been strengthening smallholder farmers’ capacity to produce and trade through a Purchase for Progress (P4P) programme run with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). P4P includes trainings on agricultural techniques and organization, literacy to promote women’s role in the communities, construction of agricultural infrastructure and roads rehabilitation. It also enables farmers to connect with markets and traders, and engage in commodity bulking and collective marketing. In 2016 P4P expanded to North Kivu province.  In the photo: WFP DRC Country Director Claude Jibidar vists a new Purchase for Progress programme launched in North Kivu in early 2016. 250 women who participated in a literacy programme received sewing machines.   Photo: WFP/Jacques David
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5472 x 3648 px 193.04 x 128.69 cm 6806.00 kb
 
Rwanda, Rukiri village, Gisagara sector in Ngoma District, 7th November 2016  WFP is building on the progress made by the purchase for progress (P4P) initiative in supporting the Ministry of Agriculture to strengthen its ability to assist small-holder farmers’ access to markets, while also enhancing their capacity in post-harvest handling, storage, commodity tracking, and management of the national strategic food reserves.   Joyce 47, has five children. She lives in Rukiri village, Gisagara sector in Ngoma District (Eastern Rwanda). She is a small-scale farmer and is a member of the KOREMU farmer’s organisation (cooperative) that benefits from the technical expertise provided by WFP. The “Murama” farmers’ organisation was established in 2011, accredited by National cooperatives Union. KOREMU counts 350 members, out of which 48.5 percent are women.  As a consequence of the erratic climate patterns the rainy season started late and the crops that Joyce planted are behind the usual growth pattern, the phenomenon extends the duration of the lean season so by consequence food prices are higher than the average for the season. Joyce received a WFP subsidised plastic silo to store her harvested crops. Through training and coaching and help from fellow farmers who monitor each other to help reduce post-harvest losses by reducing exposure to moisture and deterioration. With the improved post-harvest handling techniques, members of the KOREMU farmers’ cooperative have doubled the produce sold to national markets at each harvest.  In the photo: Grace Mukamana (Vice President of KOREMU cooperative) illustrates the various facilities that are made available to the farmers who are part of the cooperative.
The harvest drying room.  Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud
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4928 x 3280 px 41.72 x 27.77 cm 5318.00 kb

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