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Uganda, Adjumani Settlement, 2 June 2017  Cash in Uganda: Healthier families, fuller pockets.  Uganda is now the largest refugee hosting country in Africa — with around 1.3 million refugees. 170,000 of these refugees receive assistance from World Food Programme in the form of cash transfers, which are making a real difference to their lives. The WFP cash transfers boost the local economy by around US$ 900,000 every month. The benefits of these cash transfers reverberate throughout the host community. Every dollar of WFP food assistance multiplies by an additional dollar in and around refugee settlements. For cash assistance it is even higher — it multiplies by an additional $1.50.  Research conducted by the University of California, Davis and WFP in 2016 found that an average refugee household receiving cash food assistance at Adjumani Settlement increases annual real income in the local economy by 3.7 million Ugandan Shillings (US$1,072). The income multipliers come about when the refugees buy goods from the markets in and around the settlements using cash given to them by WFP.  In the Photo: South Sudanese refugees purchasing food with cash received by WFP in Adjumani, Northern Uganda.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20170602_W....JPG
7360 x 4912 px 77.89 x 51.99 cm 1270.00 kb
 
Uganda, Adjumani Settlement, 2 June 2017  Cash in Uganda: Healthier families, fuller pockets.  Uganda is now the largest refugee hosting country in Africa — with around 1.3 million refugees. 170,000 of these refugees receive assistance from World Food Programme in the form of cash transfers, which are making a real difference to their lives. The WFP cash transfers boost the local economy by around US$ 900,000 every month. The benefits of these cash transfers reverberate throughout the host community. Every dollar of WFP food assistance multiplies by an additional dollar in and around refugee settlements. For cash assistance it is even higher — it multiplies by an additional $1.50.  Research conducted by the University of California, Davis and WFP in 2016 found that an average refugee household receiving cash food assistance at Adjumani Settlement increases annual real income in the local economy by 3.7 million Ugandan Shillings (US$1,072). The income multipliers come about when the refugees buy goods from the markets in and around the settlements using cash given to them by WFP.  In the Photo: South Sudanese refugees purchasing food with cash received by WFP in Adjumani, Northern Uganda.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20170602_W....JPG
4912 x 7360 px 51.99 x 77.89 cm 1131.00 kb
 
Uganda, Adjumani Settlement, 2 June 2017  Cash in Uganda: Healthier families, fuller pockets.  Uganda is now the largest refugee hosting country in Africa — with around 1.3 million refugees. 170,000 of these refugees receive assistance from World Food Programme in the form of cash transfers, which are making a real difference to their lives. The WFP cash transfers boost the local economy by around US$ 900,000 every month. The benefits of these cash transfers reverberate throughout the host community. Every dollar of WFP food assistance multiplies by an additional dollar in and around refugee settlements. For cash assistance it is even higher — it multiplies by an additional $1.50.  Research conducted by the University of California, Davis and WFP in 2016 found that an average refugee household receiving cash food assistance at Adjumani Settlement increases annual real income in the local economy by 3.7 million Ugandan Shillings (US$1,072). The income multipliers come about when the refugees buy goods from the markets in and around the settlements using cash given to them by WFP.  In the Photo: South Sudanese refugees, wait in line to collect their monthly WFP cash transfer from a mobile van.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20170602_W....JPG
4912 x 7360 px 51.99 x 77.89 cm 1155.00 kb
 
Uganda, Adjumani Settlement, 2 June 2017  Cash in Uganda: Healthier families, fuller pockets.  Uganda is now the largest refugee hosting country in Africa — with around 1.3 million refugees. 170,000 of these refugees receive assistance from World Food Programme in the form of cash transfers, which are making a real difference to their lives. The WFP cash transfers boost the local economy by around US$ 900,000 every month. The benefits of these cash transfers reverberate throughout the host community. Every dollar of WFP food assistance multiplies by an additional dollar in and around refugee settlements. For cash assistance it is even higher — it multiplies by an additional $1.50.  Research conducted by the University of California, Davis and WFP in 2016 found that an average refugee household receiving cash food assistance at Adjumani Settlement increases annual real income in the local economy by 3.7 million Ugandan Shillings (US$1,072). The income multipliers come about when the refugees buy goods from the markets in and around the settlements using cash given to them by WFP.  In the Photo: South Sudanese refugees, wait in line to collect their monthly WFP cash transfer from a mobile van.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20170602_W....JPG
7360 x 4912 px 77.89 x 51.99 cm 1193.00 kb
 
Uganda, Adjumani Settlement, 2 June 2017  Cash in Uganda: Healthier families, fuller pockets.  Uganda is now the largest refugee hosting country in Africa — with around 1.3 million refugees. 170,000 of these refugees receive assistance from World Food Programme in the form of cash transfers, which are making a real difference to their lives. The WFP cash transfers boost the local economy by around US$ 900,000 every month. The benefits of these cash transfers reverberate throughout the host community. Every dollar of WFP food assistance multiplies by an additional dollar in and around refugee settlements. For cash assistance it is even higher — it multiplies by an additional $1.50.  Research conducted by the University of California, Davis and WFP in 2016 found that an average refugee household receiving cash food assistance at Adjumani Settlement increases annual real income in the local economy by 3.7 million Ugandan Shillings (US$1,072). The income multipliers come about when the refugees buy goods from the markets in and around the settlements using cash given to them by WFP.  In the Photo: South Sudanese refugees purchasing food with cash received by WFP in Adjumani, Northern Uganda.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20170602_W....JPG
4912 x 7360 px 51.99 x 77.89 cm 1175.00 kb
 
Uganda, Adjumani Settlement, 2 June 2017  Cash in Uganda: Healthier families, fuller pockets.  Uganda is now the largest refugee hosting country in Africa — with around 1.3 million refugees. 170,000 of these refugees receive assistance from World Food Programme in the form of cash transfers, which are making a real difference to their lives. The WFP cash transfers boost the local economy by around US$ 900,000 every month. The benefits of these cash transfers reverberate throughout the host community. Every dollar of WFP food assistance multiplies by an additional dollar in and around refugee settlements. For cash assistance it is even higher — it multiplies by an additional $1.50.  Research conducted by the University of California, Davis and WFP in 2016 found that an average refugee household receiving cash food assistance at Adjumani Settlement increases annual real income in the local economy by 3.7 million Ugandan Shillings (US$1,072). The income multipliers come about when the refugees buy goods from the markets in and around the settlements using cash given to them by WFP.  In the Photo: a South Sudanese refugee, counts her WFP cash transfer in Adjumani, Northern Uganda.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20170602_W....JPG
4912 x 7360 px 51.99 x 77.89 cm 1197.00 kb
 
Uganda, Adjumani Settlement, 2 June 2017  Cash in Uganda: Healthier families, fuller pockets.  Uganda is now the largest refugee hosting country in Africa — with around 1.3 million refugees. 170,000 of these refugees receive assistance from World Food Programme in the form of cash transfers, which are making a real difference to their lives. The WFP cash transfers boost the local economy by around US$ 900,000 every month. The benefits of these cash transfers reverberate throughout the host community. Every dollar of WFP food assistance multiplies by an additional dollar in and around refugee settlements. For cash assistance it is even higher — it multiplies by an additional $1.50.  Research conducted by the University of California, Davis and WFP in 2016 found that an average refugee household receiving cash food assistance at Adjumani Settlement increases annual real income in the local economy by 3.7 million Ugandan Shillings (US$1,072). The income multipliers come about when the refugees buy goods from the markets in and around the settlements using cash given to them by WFP.  In the Photo: a South Sudanese refugee, counts her WFP cash transfer in Adjumani, Northern Uganda.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20170602_W....JPG
4912 x 7360 px 51.99 x 77.89 cm 1071.00 kb
 
Uganda, Adjumani Settlement, 2 June 2017  Cash in Uganda: Healthier families, fuller pockets.  Uganda is now the largest refugee hosting country in Africa — with around 1.3 million refugees. 170,000 of these refugees receive assistance from World Food Programme in the form of cash transfers, which are making a real difference to their lives. The WFP cash transfers boost the local economy by around US$ 900,000 every month. The benefits of these cash transfers reverberate throughout the host community. Every dollar of WFP food assistance multiplies by an additional dollar in and around refugee settlements. For cash assistance it is even higher — it multiplies by an additional $1.50.  Research conducted by the University of California, Davis and WFP in 2016 found that an average refugee household receiving cash food assistance at Adjumani Settlement increases annual real income in the local economy by 3.7 million Ugandan Shillings (US$1,072). The income multipliers come about when the refugees buy goods from the markets in and around the settlements using cash given to them by WFP.  In the Photo: South Sudanese refugees, wait in line to collect their monthly WFP cash transfer from a mobile van.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20170602_W....JPG
7360 x 4912 px 77.89 x 51.99 cm 1183.00 kb
 
Uganda, Adjumani Settlement, 2 June 2017  Cash in Uganda: Healthier families, fuller pockets.  Uganda is now the largest refugee hosting country in Africa — with around 1.3 million refugees. 170,000 of these refugees receive assistance from World Food Programme in the form of cash transfers, which are making a real difference to their lives. The WFP cash transfers boost the local economy by around US$ 900,000 every month. The benefits of these cash transfers reverberate throughout the host community. Every dollar of WFP food assistance multiplies by an additional dollar in and around refugee settlements. For cash assistance it is even higher — it multiplies by an additional $1.50.  Research conducted by the University of California, Davis and WFP in 2016 found that an average refugee household receiving cash food assistance at Adjumani Settlement increases annual real income in the local economy by 3.7 million Ugandan Shillings (US$1,072). The income multipliers come about when the refugees buy goods from the markets in and around the settlements using cash given to them by WFP.  In the Photo: South Sudanese refugees, wait in line to collect their monthly WFP cash transfer from a mobile van.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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7360 x 4912 px 77.89 x 51.99 cm 1128.00 kb
 
Uganda, Adjumani Settlement, 1 June 2017  Cash in Uganda: Healthier families, fuller pockets.  Uganda is now the largest refugee hosting country in Africa — with around 1.3 million refugees. 170,000 of these refugees receive assistance from World Food Programme in the form of cash transfers, which are making a real difference to their lives. The WFP cash transfers boost the local economy by around US$ 900,000 every month. The benefits of these cash transfers reverberate throughout the host community. Every dollar of WFP food assistance multiplies by an additional dollar in and around refugee settlements. For cash assistance it is even higher — it multiplies by an additional $1.50.  Research conducted by the University of California, Davis and WFP in 2016 found that an average refugee household receiving cash food assistance at Adjumani Settlement increases annual real income in the local economy by 3.7 million Ugandan Shillings (US$1,072). The income multipliers come about when the refugees buy goods from the markets in and around the settlements using cash given to them by WFP.  In the Photo: WFP cash transfer for South Sudanese refugees in Adjumani, Northern Uganda.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20170602_W....JPG
7360 x 4912 px 77.89 x 51.99 cm 1061.00 kb
 
Uganda, Adjumani Settlement, 2 June 2017  Cash in Uganda: Healthier families, fuller pockets.  Uganda is now the largest refugee hosting country in Africa — with around 1.3 million refugees. 170,000 of these refugees receive assistance from World Food Programme in the form of cash transfers, which are making a real difference to their lives. The WFP cash transfers boost the local economy by around US$ 900,000 every month. The benefits of these cash transfers reverberate throughout the host community. Every dollar of WFP food assistance multiplies by an additional dollar in and around refugee settlements. For cash assistance it is even higher — it multiplies by an additional $1.50.  Research conducted by the University of California, Davis and WFP in 2016 found that an average refugee household receiving cash food assistance at Adjumani Settlement increases annual real income in the local economy by 3.7 million Ugandan Shillings (US$1,072). The income multipliers come about when the refugees buy goods from the markets in and around the settlements using cash given to them by WFP.  In the Photo: South Sudanese refugee having his family meal with food purchased with cash received by WFP in Adjumani, Northern Uganda.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20170602_W....JPG
7360 x 4912 px 77.89 x 51.99 cm 1239.00 kb
 
Uganda, Adjumani Settlement, 2 June 2017  Cash in Uganda: Healthier families, fuller pockets.  Uganda is now the largest refugee hosting country in Africa — with around 1.3 million refugees. 170,000 of these refugees receive assistance from World Food Programme in the form of cash transfers, which are making a real difference to their lives. The WFP cash transfers boost the local economy by around US$ 900,000 every month. The benefits of these cash transfers reverberate throughout the host community. Every dollar of WFP food assistance multiplies by an additional dollar in and around refugee settlements. For cash assistance it is even higher — it multiplies by an additional $1.50.  Research conducted by the University of California, Davis and WFP in 2016 found that an average refugee household receiving cash food assistance at Adjumani Settlement increases annual real income in the local economy by 3.7 million Ugandan Shillings (US$1,072). The income multipliers come about when the refugees buy goods from the markets in and around the settlements using cash given to them by WFP.  In the Photo: South Sudanese refugee having his family meal with food purchased with cash received by WFP in Adjumani, Northern Uganda.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20170602_W....JPG
4912 x 7360 px 51.99 x 77.89 cm 1190.00 kb
 
Uganda, Adjumani Settlement, 2 June 2017  Cash in Uganda: Healthier families, fuller pockets.  Uganda is now the largest refugee hosting country in Africa — with around 1.3 million refugees. 170,000 of these refugees receive assistance from World Food Programme in the form of cash transfers, which are making a real difference to their lives. The WFP cash transfers boost the local economy by around US$ 900,000 every month. The benefits of these cash transfers reverberate throughout the host community. Every dollar of WFP food assistance multiplies by an additional dollar in and around refugee settlements. For cash assistance it is even higher — it multiplies by an additional $1.50.  Research conducted by the University of California, Davis and WFP in 2016 found that an average refugee household receiving cash food assistance at Adjumani Settlement increases annual real income in the local economy by 3.7 million Ugandan Shillings (US$1,072). The income multipliers come about when the refugees buy goods from the markets in and around the settlements using cash given to them by WFP.  In the Photo: South Sudanese refugees having their family meal with food purchased with cash received by WFP in Adjumani, Northern Uganda.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20170602_W....JPG
7360 x 4912 px 77.89 x 51.99 cm 1191.00 kb
 
Uganda, Adjumani Settlement, 2 June 2017  Cash in Uganda: Healthier families, fuller pockets.  Uganda is now the largest refugee hosting country in Africa — with around 1.3 million refugees. 170,000 of these refugees receive assistance from World Food Programme in the form of cash transfers, which are making a real difference to their lives. The WFP cash transfers boost the local economy by around US$ 900,000 every month. The benefits of these cash transfers reverberate throughout the host community. Every dollar of WFP food assistance multiplies by an additional dollar in and around refugee settlements. For cash assistance it is even higher — it multiplies by an additional $1.50.  Research conducted by the University of California, Davis and WFP in 2016 found that an average refugee household receiving cash food assistance at Adjumani Settlement increases annual real income in the local economy by 3.7 million Ugandan Shillings (US$1,072). The income multipliers come about when the refugees buy goods from the markets in and around the settlements using cash given to them by WFP.  In the Photo: South Sudanese refugees having their family meal with food purchased with cash received by WFP in Adjumani, Northern Uganda.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20170602_W....JPG
7360 x 4912 px 77.89 x 51.99 cm 1134.00 kb
 
Uganda, Adjumani Settlement, 2 June 2017  Cash in Uganda: Healthier families, fuller pockets.  Uganda is now the largest refugee hosting country in Africa — with around 1.3 million refugees. 170,000 of these refugees receive assistance from World Food Programme in the form of cash transfers, which are making a real difference to their lives. The WFP cash transfers boost the local economy by around US$ 900,000 every month. The benefits of these cash transfers reverberate throughout the host community. Every dollar of WFP food assistance multiplies by an additional dollar in and around refugee settlements. For cash assistance it is even higher — it multiplies by an additional $1.50.  Research conducted by the University of California, Davis and WFP in 2016 found that an average refugee household receiving cash food assistance at Adjumani Settlement increases annual real income in the local economy by 3.7 million Ugandan Shillings (US$1,072). The income multipliers come about when the refugees buy goods from the markets in and around the settlements using cash given to them by WFP.  In the Photo: South Sudanese refugees having their family meal with food purchased with cash received by WFP in Adjumani, Northern Uganda.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20170602_W....JPG
7360 x 4912 px 77.89 x 51.99 cm 1188.00 kb
 
Uganda, Adjumani Settlement, 2 June 2017  Cash in Uganda: Healthier families, fuller pockets.  Uganda is now the largest refugee hosting country in Africa — with around 1.3 million refugees. 170,000 of these refugees receive assistance from World Food Programme in the form of cash transfers, which are making a real difference to their lives. The WFP cash transfers boost the local economy by around US$ 900,000 every month. The benefits of these cash transfers reverberate throughout the host community. Every dollar of WFP food assistance multiplies by an additional dollar in and around refugee settlements. For cash assistance it is even higher — it multiplies by an additional $1.50.  Research conducted by the University of California, Davis and WFP in 2016 found that an average refugee household receiving cash food assistance at Adjumani Settlement increases annual real income in the local economy by 3.7 million Ugandan Shillings (US$1,072). The income multipliers come about when the refugees buy goods from the markets in and around the settlements using cash given to them by WFP.   Akech Mayom, aged 45, fled South Sudan in January 2014, after her village in Jonglei State was set on fire. “We were surrounded by bodies, I saw my husband and his brother lying there,” recalled Akech. “It was so traumatic. We had to run and leave them there.” Akech arrived in Uganda, with seven children to care for — her own three sons, three nieces and nephew. Akech received food from WFP for over two years, and missed the food she used to grow and eat in South Sudan. In 2016 Akech started receiving her assistance in the form of a cash transfer and was delighted. “We were rich with food in South Sudan before the fighting started. With the cash I get from WFP I can have a similar diet to what I had there. I buy millet, greens, beans and milk,” she said. “I also can buy fresh vegetables for my children. I am proud I can make this choice for them,” She added.  In the Photo: Akech Mayom, a South Sudanese refugee, preparing the meal after collecting her monthly WFP cash transfer from a mobile van.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20170602_W....JPG
7360 x 4912 px 77.89 x 51.99 cm 1056.00 kb
 
Uganda, Adjumani Settlement, 2 June 2017  Cash in Uganda: Healthier families, fuller pockets.  Uganda is now the largest refugee hosting country in Africa — with around 1.3 million refugees. 170,000 of these refugees receive assistance from World Food Programme in the form of cash transfers, which are making a real difference to their lives. The WFP cash transfers boost the local economy by around US$ 900,000 every month. The benefits of these cash transfers reverberate throughout the host community. Every dollar of WFP food assistance multiplies by an additional dollar in and around refugee settlements. For cash assistance it is even higher — it multiplies by an additional $1.50.  Research conducted by the University of California, Davis and WFP in 2016 found that an average refugee household receiving cash food assistance at Adjumani Settlement increases annual real income in the local economy by 3.7 million Ugandan Shillings (US$1,072). The income multipliers come about when the refugees buy goods from the markets in and around the settlements using cash given to them by WFP.   Akech Mayom, aged 45, fled South Sudan in January 2014, after her village in Jonglei State was set on fire. “We were surrounded by bodies, I saw my husband and his brother lying there,” recalled Akech. “It was so traumatic. We had to run and leave them there.” Akech arrived in Uganda, with seven children to care for — her own three sons, three nieces and nephew. Akech received food from WFP for over two years, and missed the food she used to grow and eat in South Sudan. In 2016 Akech started receiving her assistance in the form of a cash transfer and was delighted. “We were rich with food in South Sudan before the fighting started. With the cash I get from WFP I can have a similar diet to what I had there. I buy millet, greens, beans and milk,” she said. “I also can buy fresh vegetables for my children. I am proud I can make this choice for them,” She added.  In the Photo: Akech Mayom, a South Sudanese refugee, preparing the meal after collecting her monthly WFP cash transfer from a mobile van.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20170602_W....JPG
4912 x 7360 px 51.99 x 77.89 cm 1106.00 kb
 
Uganda, Adjumani Settlement, 2 June 2017  Cash in Uganda: Healthier families, fuller pockets.  Uganda is now the largest refugee hosting country in Africa — with around 1.3 million refugees. 170,000 of these refugees receive assistance from World Food Programme in the form of cash transfers, which are making a real difference to their lives. The WFP cash transfers boost the local economy by around US$ 900,000 every month. The benefits of these cash transfers reverberate throughout the host community. Every dollar of WFP food assistance multiplies by an additional dollar in and around refugee settlements. For cash assistance it is even higher — it multiplies by an additional $1.50.  Research conducted by the University of California, Davis and WFP in 2016 found that an average refugee household receiving cash food assistance at Adjumani Settlement increases annual real income in the local economy by 3.7 million Ugandan Shillings (US$1,072). The income multipliers come about when the refugees buy goods from the markets in and around the settlements using cash given to them by WFP.   Akech Mayom, aged 45, fled South Sudan in January 2014, after her village in Jonglei State was set on fire. “We were surrounded by bodies, I saw my husband and his brother lying there,” recalled Akech. “It was so traumatic. We had to run and leave them there.” Akech arrived in Uganda, with seven children to care for — her own three sons, three nieces and nephew. Akech received food from WFP for over two years, and missed the food she used to grow and eat in South Sudan. In 2016 Akech started receiving her assistance in the form of a cash transfer and was delighted. “We were rich with food in South Sudan before the fighting started. With the cash I get from WFP I can have a similar diet to what I had there. I buy millet, greens, beans and milk,” she said. “I also can buy fresh vegetables for my children. I am proud I can make this choice for them,” She added.  In the Photo: Akech Mayom, a South Sudanese refugee, preparing the meal after collecting her monthly WFP cash transfer from a mobile van.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20170602_W....JPG
4912 x 7360 px 51.99 x 77.89 cm 1206.00 kb
 
Uganda, Adjumani Settlement, 2 June 2017  Cash in Uganda: Healthier families, fuller pockets.  Uganda is now the largest refugee hosting country in Africa — with around 1.3 million refugees. 170,000 of these refugees receive assistance from World Food Programme in the form of cash transfers, which are making a real difference to their lives. The WFP cash transfers boost the local economy by around US$ 900,000 every month. The benefits of these cash transfers reverberate throughout the host community. Every dollar of WFP food assistance multiplies by an additional dollar in and around refugee settlements. For cash assistance it is even higher — it multiplies by an additional $1.50.  Research conducted by the University of California, Davis and WFP in 2016 found that an average refugee household receiving cash food assistance at Adjumani Settlement increases annual real income in the local economy by 3.7 million Ugandan Shillings (US$1,072). The income multipliers come about when the refugees buy goods from the markets in and around the settlements using cash given to them by WFP.   Akech Mayom, aged 45, fled South Sudan in January 2014, after her village in Jonglei State was set on fire. “We were surrounded by bodies, I saw my husband and his brother lying there,” recalled Akech. “It was so traumatic. We had to run and leave them there.” Akech arrived in Uganda, with seven children to care for — her own three sons, three nieces and nephew. Akech received food from WFP for over two years, and missed the food she used to grow and eat in South Sudan. In 2016 Akech started receiving her assistance in the form of a cash transfer and was delighted. “We were rich with food in South Sudan before the fighting started. With the cash I get from WFP I can have a similar diet to what I had there. I buy millet, greens, beans and milk,” she said. “I also can buy fresh vegetables for my children. I am proud I can make this choice for them,” She added.  In the Photo: Akech Mayom, a South Sudanese refugee, preparing the meal after collecting her monthly WFP cash transfer from a mobile van.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20170602_W....JPG
7360 x 4912 px 77.89 x 51.99 cm 1187.00 kb
 
Uganda, Adjumani Settlement, 2 June 2017  Cash in Uganda: Healthier families, fuller pockets.  Uganda is now the largest refugee hosting country in Africa — with around 1.3 million refugees. 170,000 of these refugees receive assistance from World Food Programme in the form of cash transfers, which are making a real difference to their lives. The WFP cash transfers boost the local economy by around US$ 900,000 every month. The benefits of these cash transfers reverberate throughout the host community. Every dollar of WFP food assistance multiplies by an additional dollar in and around refugee settlements. For cash assistance it is even higher — it multiplies by an additional $1.50.  Research conducted by the University of California, Davis and WFP in 2016 found that an average refugee household receiving cash food assistance at Adjumani Settlement increases annual real income in the local economy by 3.7 million Ugandan Shillings (US$1,072). The income multipliers come about when the refugees buy goods from the markets in and around the settlements using cash given to them by WFP.   Akech Mayom, aged 45, fled South Sudan in January 2014, after her village in Jonglei State was set on fire. “We were surrounded by bodies, I saw my husband and his brother lying there,” recalled Akech. “It was so traumatic. We had to run and leave them there.” Akech arrived in Uganda, with seven children to care for — her own three sons, three nieces and nephew. Akech received food from WFP for over two years, and missed the food she used to grow and eat in South Sudan. In 2016 Akech started receiving her assistance in the form of a cash transfer and was delighted. “We were rich with food in South Sudan before the fighting started. With the cash I get from WFP I can have a similar diet to what I had there. I buy millet, greens, beans and milk,” she said. “I also can buy fresh vegetables for my children. I am proud I can make this choice for them,” She added.  In the Photo: Akech Mayom (right), a South Sudanese refugee, preparing the meal after collecting her monthly WFP cash transfer from a mobile van.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20170602_W....JPG
7360 x 4912 px 77.89 x 51.99 cm 1089.00 kb
 
Uganda, Adjumani Settlement, 2 June 2017  Cash in Uganda: Healthier families, fuller pockets.  Uganda is now the largest refugee hosting country in Africa — with around 1.3 million refugees. 170,000 of these refugees receive assistance from World Food Programme in the form of cash transfers, which are making a real difference to their lives. The WFP cash transfers boost the local economy by around US$ 900,000 every month. The benefits of these cash transfers reverberate throughout the host community. Every dollar of WFP food assistance multiplies by an additional dollar in and around refugee settlements. For cash assistance it is even higher — it multiplies by an additional $1.50.  Research conducted by the University of California, Davis and WFP in 2016 found that an average refugee household receiving cash food assistance at Adjumani Settlement increases annual real income in the local economy by 3.7 million Ugandan Shillings (US$1,072). The income multipliers come about when the refugees buy goods from the markets in and around the settlements using cash given to them by WFP.  In the Photo: a South Sudanese refugee collecting her WFP cash transfer in Adjumani, Northern Uganda.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
UGA_20170602_W....JPG
7360 x 4912 px 77.89 x 51.99 cm 1241.00 kb
 
Uganda, Adjumani Settlement, 2 June 2017  Cash in Uganda: Healthier families, fuller pockets.  Uganda is now the largest refugee hosting country in Africa — with around 1.3 million refugees. 170,000 of these refugees receive assistance from World Food Programme in the form of cash transfers, which are making a real difference to their lives. The WFP cash transfers boost the local economy by around US$ 900,000 every month. The benefits of these cash transfers reverberate throughout the host community. Every dollar of WFP food assistance multiplies by an additional dollar in and around refugee settlements. For cash assistance it is even higher — it multiplies by an additional $1.50.  Research conducted by the University of California, Davis and WFP in 2016 found that an average refugee household receiving cash food assistance at Adjumani Settlement increases annual real income in the local economy by 3.7 million Ugandan Shillings (US$1,072). The income multipliers come about when the refugees buy goods from the markets in and around the settlements using cash given to them by WFP.  In the Photo: a South Sudanese refugee collecting her WFP cash transfer in Adjumani, Northern Uganda.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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Uganda, Adjumani Settlement, 2 June 2017  Cash in Uganda: Healthier families, fuller pockets.  Uganda is now the largest refugee hosting country in Africa — with around 1.3 million refugees. 170,000 of these refugees receive assistance from World Food Programme in the form of cash transfers, which are making a real difference to their lives. The WFP cash transfers boost the local economy by around US$ 900,000 every month. The benefits of these cash transfers reverberate throughout the host community. Every dollar of WFP food assistance multiplies by an additional dollar in and around refugee settlements. For cash assistance it is even higher — it multiplies by an additional $1.50.  Research conducted by the University of California, Davis and WFP in 2016 found that an average refugee household receiving cash food assistance at Adjumani Settlement increases annual real income in the local economy by 3.7 million Ugandan Shillings (US$1,072). The income multipliers come about when the refugees buy goods from the markets in and around the settlements using cash given to them by WFP.  In the Photo: a South Sudanese refugee collecting her WFP cash transfer in Adjumani, Northern Uganda.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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Uganda, Adjumani Settlement, 2 June 2017  Cash in Uganda: Healthier families, fuller pockets.  Uganda is now the largest refugee hosting country in Africa — with around 1.3 million refugees. 170,000 of these refugees receive assistance from World Food Programme in the form of cash transfers, which are making a real difference to their lives. The WFP cash transfers boost the local economy by around US$ 900,000 every month. The benefits of these cash transfers reverberate throughout the host community. Every dollar of WFP food assistance multiplies by an additional dollar in and around refugee settlements. For cash assistance it is even higher — it multiplies by an additional $1.50.  Research conducted by the University of California, Davis and WFP in 2016 found that an average refugee household receiving cash food assistance at Adjumani Settlement increases annual real income in the local economy by 3.7 million Ugandan Shillings (US$1,072). The income multipliers come about when the refugees buy goods from the markets in and around the settlements using cash given to them by WFP.   Akech Mayom, aged 45, fled South Sudan in January 2014, after her village in Jonglei State was set on fire. “We were surrounded by bodies, I saw my husband and his brother lying there,” recalled Akech. “It was so traumatic. We had to run and leave them there.” Akech arrived in Uganda, with seven children to care for — her own three sons, three nieces and nephew. Akech received food from WFP for over two years, and missed the food she used to grow and eat in South Sudan. In 2016 Akech started receiving her assistance in the form of a cash transfer and was delighted. “We were rich with food in South Sudan before the fighting started. With the cash I get from WFP I can have a similar diet to what I had there. I buy millet, greens, beans and milk,” she said. “I also can buy fresh vegetables for my children. I am proud I can make this choice for them,” She added.  In the Photo: Akech Mayom, a South Sudanese refugee, waits in line to collect her monthly WFP cash transfer from a mobile van.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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Uganda, Adjumani Settlement, 1 June 2017  Cash in Uganda: Healthier families, fuller pockets.  Uganda is now the largest refugee hosting country in Africa — with around 1.3 million refugees. 170,000 of these refugees receive assistance from World Food Programme in the form of cash transfers, which are making a real difference to their lives. The WFP cash transfers boost the local economy by around US$ 900,000 every month. The benefits of these cash transfers reverberate throughout the host community. Every dollar of WFP food assistance multiplies by an additional dollar in and around refugee settlements. For cash assistance it is even higher — it multiplies by an additional $1.50.  Research conducted by the University of California, Davis and WFP in 2016 found that an average refugee household receiving cash food assistance at Adjumani Settlement increases annual real income in the local economy by 3.7 million Ugandan Shillings (US$1,072). The income multipliers come about when the refugees buy goods from the markets in and around the settlements using cash given to them by WFP.  In the Photo: a South Sudanese refugee collecting her WFP cash transfer in Adjumani, Northern Uganda.  Photo: WFP/Hugh Rutherford
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