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"school meals": 8887 results 

 
Kyrgyzstan, Maimak, Talas Region. 10 April 2018.  WFP has created a sustainable, cost-effective model which the Government has replicated to further expand the reach of the programme, currently covering 450 primary schools across the country. Every day, children receive one hot, nutritious meal comprising soups or cereal porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. WFP provides fortified wheat for the meals as well as technical assistance and trainings for school cooks.  A tiny school named after Raikan Shukurbekov is located in remote village of Maimak, along a Kyrgyz-Kazakh border. Although this village is only 300 km away from the country’s capital of Bishkek, it would take about 10 to 12 hours to get there by a road. Travelers would go through two 3000-meter mountain passes, a high-altitude valley and tens of little rivers in the way to Maimak. A school with only 150 students is a pilot in the WFP’s school meals optimization project. WFP provided canteen equipment and train a school chef to ensure the primary school students can have nutritious hot lunches every day, which are so much needed to help children get energy to study and develop in this challenging terrain.  In the Photo: Raikan Shukurbekov School in Maimak, Kyrgyzstan.  Photo: WFP/Olga Niazalieva
KYR_20180410_W....JPG
3861 x 2574 px 32.69 x 21.79 cm 903.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Maimak, Talas Region. 10 April 2018.  WFP has created a sustainable, cost-effective model which the Government has replicated to further expand the reach of the programme, currently covering 450 primary schools across the country. Every day, children receive one hot, nutritious meal comprising soups or cereal porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. WFP provides fortified wheat for the meals as well as technical assistance and trainings for school cooks.  A tiny school named after Raikan Shukurbekov is located in remote village of Maimak, along a Kyrgyz-Kazakh border. Although this village is only 300 km away from the country’s capital of Bishkek, it would take about 10 to 12 hours to get there by a road. Travelers would go through two 3000-meter mountain passes, a high-altitude valley and tens of little rivers in the way to Maimak. A school with only 150 students is a pilot in the WFP’s school meals optimization project. WFP provided canteen equipment and train a school chef to ensure the primary school students can have nutritious hot lunches every day, which are so much needed to help children get energy to study and develop in this challenging terrain.  In the Photo: Raikan Shukurbekov School in Maimak, Kyrgyzstan.  Photo: WFP/Olga Niazalieva
KYR_20180410_W....JPG
3861 x 2574 px 32.69 x 21.79 cm 636.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Maimak, Talas Region. 10 April 2018.  WFP has created a sustainable, cost-effective model which the Government has replicated to further expand the reach of the programme, currently covering 450 primary schools across the country. Every day, children receive one hot, nutritious meal comprising soups or cereal porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. WFP provides fortified wheat for the meals as well as technical assistance and trainings for school cooks.  A tiny school named after Raikan Shukurbekov is located in remote village of Maimak, along a Kyrgyz-Kazakh border. Although this village is only 300 km away from the country’s capital of Bishkek, it would take about 10 to 12 hours to get there by a road. Travelers would go through two 3000-meter mountain passes, a high-altitude valley and tens of little rivers in the way to Maimak. A school with only 150 students is a pilot in the WFP’s school meals optimization project. WFP provided canteen equipment and train a school chef to ensure the primary school students can have nutritious hot lunches every day, which are so much needed to help children get energy to study and develop in this challenging terrain.  In the Photo: Raikan Shukurbekov School in Maimak, Kyrgyzstan.  Photo: WFP/Olga Niazalieva
KYR_20180410_W....JPG
3861 x 2574 px 32.69 x 21.79 cm 952.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Maimak, Talas Region. 10 April 2018.  WFP has created a sustainable, cost-effective model which the Government has replicated to further expand the reach of the programme, currently covering 450 primary schools across the country. Every day, children receive one hot, nutritious meal comprising soups or cereal porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. WFP provides fortified wheat for the meals as well as technical assistance and trainings for school cooks.  A tiny school named after Raikan Shukurbekov is located in remote village of Maimak, along a Kyrgyz-Kazakh border. Although this village is only 300 km away from the country’s capital of Bishkek, it would take about 10 to 12 hours to get there by a road. Travelers would go through two 3000-meter mountain passes, a high-altitude valley and tens of little rivers in the way to Maimak. A school with only 150 students is a pilot in the WFP’s school meals optimization project. WFP provided canteen equipment and train a school chef to ensure the primary school students can have nutritious hot lunches every day, which are so much needed to help children get energy to study and develop in this challenging terrain.  In the Photo: Raikan Shukurbekov School in Maimak, Kyrgyzstan.  Photo: WFP/Olga Niazalieva
KYR_20180410_W....JPG
3861 x 2574 px 32.69 x 21.79 cm 797.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Maimak, Talas Region. 10 April 2018.  WFP has created a sustainable, cost-effective model which the Government has replicated to further expand the reach of the programme, currently covering 450 primary schools across the country. Every day, children receive one hot, nutritious meal comprising soups or cereal porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. WFP provides fortified wheat for the meals as well as technical assistance and trainings for school cooks.  A tiny school named after Raikan Shukurbekov is located in remote village of Maimak, along a Kyrgyz-Kazakh border. Although this village is only 300 km away from the country’s capital of Bishkek, it would take about 10 to 12 hours to get there by a road. Travelers would go through two 3000-meter mountain passes, a high-altitude valley and tens of little rivers in the way to Maimak. A school with only 150 students is a pilot in the WFP’s school meals optimization project. WFP provided canteen equipment and train a school chef to ensure the primary school students can have nutritious hot lunches every day, which are so much needed to help children get energy to study and develop in this challenging terrain.  In the Photo: Raikan Shukurbekov School in Maimak, Kyrgyzstan.  Photo: WFP/Olga Niazalieva
KYR_20180410_W....JPG
3861 x 2574 px 32.69 x 21.79 cm 772.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Maimak, Talas Region. 10 April 2018.  WFP has created a sustainable, cost-effective model which the Government has replicated to further expand the reach of the programme, currently covering 450 primary schools across the country. Every day, children receive one hot, nutritious meal comprising soups or cereal porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. WFP provides fortified wheat for the meals as well as technical assistance and trainings for school cooks.  A tiny school named after Raikan Shukurbekov is located in remote village of Maimak, along a Kyrgyz-Kazakh border. Although this village is only 300 km away from the country’s capital of Bishkek, it would take about 10 to 12 hours to get there by a road. Travelers would go through two 3000-meter mountain passes, a high-altitude valley and tens of little rivers in the way to Maimak. A school with only 150 students is a pilot in the WFP’s school meals optimization project. WFP provided canteen equipment and train a school chef to ensure the primary school students can have nutritious hot lunches every day, which are so much needed to help children get energy to study and develop in this challenging terrain.  In the Photo: Raikan Shukurbekov School in Maimak, Kyrgyzstan.  Photo: WFP/Olga Niazalieva
KYR_20180410_W....JPG
3861 x 2574 px 32.69 x 21.79 cm 605.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Maimak, Talas Region. 10 April 2018.  WFP has created a sustainable, cost-effective model which the Government has replicated to further expand the reach of the programme, currently covering 450 primary schools across the country. Every day, children receive one hot, nutritious meal comprising soups or cereal porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. WFP provides fortified wheat for the meals as well as technical assistance and trainings for school cooks.  A tiny school named after Raikan Shukurbekov is located in remote village of Maimak, along a Kyrgyz-Kazakh border. Although this village is only 300 km away from the country’s capital of Bishkek, it would take about 10 to 12 hours to get there by a road. Travelers would go through two 3000-meter mountain passes, a high-altitude valley and tens of little rivers in the way to Maimak. A school with only 150 students is a pilot in the WFP’s school meals optimization project. WFP provided canteen equipment and train a school chef to ensure the primary school students can have nutritious hot lunches every day, which are so much needed to help children get energy to study and develop in this challenging terrain.  In the Photo: Raikan Shukurbekov School in Maimak, Kyrgyzstan.  Photo: WFP/Olga Niazalieva
KYR_20180410_W....JPG
3861 x 2574 px 32.69 x 21.79 cm 707.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Maimak, Talas Region. 10 April 2018.  WFP has created a sustainable, cost-effective model which the Government has replicated to further expand the reach of the programme, currently covering 450 primary schools across the country. Every day, children receive one hot, nutritious meal comprising soups or cereal porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. WFP provides fortified wheat for the meals as well as technical assistance and trainings for school cooks.  A tiny school named after Raikan Shukurbekov is located in remote village of Maimak, along a Kyrgyz-Kazakh border. Although this village is only 300 km away from the country’s capital of Bishkek, it would take about 10 to 12 hours to get there by a road. Travelers would go through two 3000-meter mountain passes, a high-altitude valley and tens of little rivers in the way to Maimak. A school with only 150 students is a pilot in the WFP’s school meals optimization project. WFP provided canteen equipment and train a school chef to ensure the primary school students can have nutritious hot lunches every day, which are so much needed to help children get energy to study and develop in this challenging terrain.  In the Photo: Raikan Shukurbekov School in Maimak, Kyrgyzstan.  Photo: WFP/Olga Niazalieva
KYR_20180410_W....JPG
3861 x 2574 px 32.69 x 21.79 cm 664.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Maimak, Talas Region. 10 April 2018.  WFP has created a sustainable, cost-effective model which the Government has replicated to further expand the reach of the programme, currently covering 450 primary schools across the country. Every day, children receive one hot, nutritious meal comprising soups or cereal porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. WFP provides fortified wheat for the meals as well as technical assistance and trainings for school cooks.  A tiny school named after Raikan Shukurbekov is located in remote village of Maimak, along a Kyrgyz-Kazakh border. Although this village is only 300 km away from the country’s capital of Bishkek, it would take about 10 to 12 hours to get there by a road. Travelers would go through two 3000-meter mountain passes, a high-altitude valley and tens of little rivers in the way to Maimak. A school with only 150 students is a pilot in the WFP’s school meals optimization project. WFP provided canteen equipment and train a school chef to ensure the primary school students can have nutritious hot lunches every day, which are so much needed to help children get energy to study and develop in this challenging terrain.  In the Photo: Raikan Shukurbekov School in Maimak, Kyrgyzstan.  Photo: WFP/Olga Niazalieva
KYR_20180410_W....JPG
3820 x 2425 px 32.34 x 20.53 cm 1024.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Maimak, Talas Region. 10 April 2018.  WFP has created a sustainable, cost-effective model which the Government has replicated to further expand the reach of the programme, currently covering 450 primary schools across the country. Every day, children receive one hot, nutritious meal comprising soups or cereal porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. WFP provides fortified wheat for the meals as well as technical assistance and trainings for school cooks.  A tiny school named after Raikan Shukurbekov is located in remote village of Maimak, along a Kyrgyz-Kazakh border. Although this village is only 300 km away from the country’s capital of Bishkek, it would take about 10 to 12 hours to get there by a road. Travelers would go through two 3000-meter mountain passes, a high-altitude valley and tens of little rivers in the way to Maimak. A school with only 150 students is a pilot in the WFP’s school meals optimization project. WFP provided canteen equipment and train a school chef to ensure the primary school students can have nutritious hot lunches every day, which are so much needed to help children get energy to study and develop in this challenging terrain.  In the Photo: Raikan Shukurbekov School in Maimak, Kyrgyzstan.  Photo: WFP/Olga Niazalieva
KYR_20180410_W....JPG
3589 x 2293 px 30.39 x 19.41 cm 692.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Maimak, Talas Region. 10 April 2018.  WFP has created a sustainable, cost-effective model which the Government has replicated to further expand the reach of the programme, currently covering 450 primary schools across the country. Every day, children receive one hot, nutritious meal comprising soups or cereal porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. WFP provides fortified wheat for the meals as well as technical assistance and trainings for school cooks.  A tiny school named after Raikan Shukurbekov is located in remote village of Maimak, along a Kyrgyz-Kazakh border. Although this village is only 300 km away from the country’s capital of Bishkek, it would take about 10 to 12 hours to get there by a road. Travelers would go through two 3000-meter mountain passes, a high-altitude valley and tens of little rivers in the way to Maimak. A school with only 150 students is a pilot in the WFP’s school meals optimization project. WFP provided canteen equipment and train a school chef to ensure the primary school students can have nutritious hot lunches every day, which are so much needed to help children get energy to study and develop in this challenging terrain.  In the Photo: Raikan Shukurbekov School in Maimak, Kyrgyzstan.  Photo: WFP/Olga Niazalieva
KYR_20180410_W....JPG
3861 x 2411 px 32.69 x 20.41 cm 1516.00 kb
 
Kyrgyzstan, Maimak, Talas Region. 10 April 2018.  WFP has created a sustainable, cost-effective model which the Government has replicated to further expand the reach of the programme, currently covering 450 primary schools across the country. Every day, children receive one hot, nutritious meal comprising soups or cereal porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. WFP provides fortified wheat for the meals as well as technical assistance and trainings for school cooks.  A tiny school named after Raikan Shukurbekov is located in remote village of Maimak, along a Kyrgyz-Kazakh border. Although this village is only 300 km away from the country’s capital of Bishkek, it would take about 10 to 12 hours to get there by a road. Travelers would go through two 3000-meter mountain passes, a high-altitude valley and tens of little rivers in the way to Maimak. A school with only 150 students is a pilot in the WFP’s school meals optimization project. WFP provided canteen equipment and train a school chef to ensure the primary school students can have nutritious hot lunches every day, which are so much needed to help children get energy to study and develop in this challenging terrain.  In the Photo: Raikan Shukurbekov School in Maimak, Kyrgyzstan.  Photo: WFP/Olga Niazalieva
KYR_20180410_W....JPG
3861 x 2574 px 32.69 x 21.79 cm 875.00 kb
 
Malawi, Didi School, district of Thyolox, 19 March 2018  WFP supports education through the provision of daily meals to around 1 million schoolchildren in 900 primary and nursery schools. In 10 percent of these schools, meals are cooked from fresh foods bought from local smallholder farmers.  In the Photo: Didi Primary School lies in the middle of one of the country’s biggest tea plantations, in a remote, difficult-to-reach valley in the southern district of Thyolox.  At Didi school, WFP — with support from USAID and USDA — provides school meals to 1,711 children.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_20180319_W....JPG
4366 x 2911 px 36.97 x 24.65 cm 2043.00 kb
 
Malawi, Didi School, district of Thyolox, 19 March 2018  WFP supports education through the provision of daily meals to around 1 million schoolchildren in 900 primary and nursery schools. In 10 percent of these schools, meals are cooked from fresh foods bought from local smallholder farmers.  In the Photo: Didi Primary School lies in the middle of one of the country’s biggest tea plantations, in a remote, difficult-to-reach valley in the southern district of Thyolox.  At Didi school, WFP — with support from USAID and USDA — provides school meals to 1,711 children.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_20180319_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 2247.00 kb
 
Malawi, district of Thyolox, 19 March 2018  “I have on more than three occasions slept on the road when my truck got stuck in the mud or when the roads were impassable due to poor conditions,” says World Food Programme (WFP) truck driver Stanley Kondowe. “But I’m always inspired every time I arrive at a school to deliver food for school meals. I’m welcomed by children joyfully shouting ‘Porridge! Porridge! Porridge!”  Every week for 11 years, Stanley has been delivering food assistance to vulnerable populations in remote and hard-to-reach areas in the southern region of Malawi. He has been stuck many times in the middle of nowhere, relying on the solidarity of his colleagues or local villagers to get his truck out of trouble.  He has many stories and anecdotes to share. It is true that delivering food in Malawi is not always a piece of cake. However, something has kept him going.  “When I deliver food or nutrition supplements to hospitals, I see a sigh of relief from staff and patients. This motivates me to work hard. I feel useful and proud of helping people in need,” says Stanley.  Didi Primary School lies in the middle of one of the country’s biggest tea plantations, in a remote, difficult-to-reach valley in the southern district of Thyolox. Although it is only 45 kms from the city of Blantyre, the terrain and poor conditions of the road means that it can take Stanley and three other WFP trucks about three hours to deliver bags of Corn Soy Blend, which is used to prepare school meals.  “My wife and children understand the nature of my work so they know that if I come late, after dark, it is because I’m having a hard time in the field. They have learnt to live with this fact,” Stanley says.  At Didi school, WFP — with support from USAID and USDA — provides school meals to 1,711 children.  “I got my truck stuck four times today. It rained yesterday and it is very slippery, but with my colleagues we are helping each other. We know some people are waiting for us and this gives us the strength to continue,” Stanley concludes.  WFP is the lead provider of school meals in Malawi. Under the leadership of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MoEST), the WFP-supported School Meals Programme aims to reduce hunger, improve student attendance and improve health and dietary practices in primary schools and pre-schools. In 2017, almost one million children benefited from school meals across 783 primary schools in 13 food insecure districts.  In the Photo: unsung hero, WFP Malawi truck driver Stanley Kondowe.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_20180319_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 2705.00 kb
 
Malawi, district of Thyolox, 19 March 2018  “I have on more than three occasions slept on the road when my truck got stuck in the mud or when the roads were impassable due to poor conditions,” says World Food Programme (WFP) truck driver Stanley Kondowe. “But I’m always inspired every time I arrive at a school to deliver food for school meals. I’m welcomed by children joyfully shouting ‘Porridge! Porridge! Porridge!”  Every week for 11 years, Stanley has been delivering food assistance to vulnerable populations in remote and hard-to-reach areas in the southern region of Malawi. He has been stuck many times in the middle of nowhere, relying on the solidarity of his colleagues or local villagers to get his truck out of trouble.  He has many stories and anecdotes to share. It is true that delivering food in Malawi is not always a piece of cake. However, something has kept him going.  “When I deliver food or nutrition supplements to hospitals, I see a sigh of relief from staff and patients. This motivates me to work hard. I feel useful and proud of helping people in need,” says Stanley.  Didi Primary School lies in the middle of one of the country’s biggest tea plantations, in a remote, difficult-to-reach valley in the southern district of Thyolox. Although it is only 45 kms from the city of Blantyre, the terrain and poor conditions of the road means that it can take Stanley and three other WFP trucks about three hours to deliver bags of Corn Soy Blend, which is used to prepare school meals.  “My wife and children understand the nature of my work so they know that if I come late, after dark, it is because I’m having a hard time in the field. They have learnt to live with this fact,” Stanley says.  At Didi school, WFP — with support from USAID and USDA — provides school meals to 1,711 children.  “I got my truck stuck four times today. It rained yesterday and it is very slippery, but with my colleagues we are helping each other. We know some people are waiting for us and this gives us the strength to continue,” Stanley concludes.  WFP is the lead provider of school meals in Malawi. Under the leadership of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MoEST), the WFP-supported School Meals Programme aims to reduce hunger, improve student attendance and improve health and dietary practices in primary schools and pre-schools. In 2017, almost one million children benefited from school meals across 783 primary schools in 13 food insecure districts.  In the Photo: unsung hero, WFP Malawi truck driver Stanley Kondowe.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_20180319_W....JPG
5407 x 3605 px 45.78 x 30.52 cm 2103.00 kb
 
Malawi, district of Thyolox, 19 March 2018  “I have on more than three occasions slept on the road when my truck got stuck in the mud or when the roads were impassable due to poor conditions,” says World Food Programme (WFP) truck driver Stanley Kondowe. “But I’m always inspired every time I arrive at a school to deliver food for school meals. I’m welcomed by children joyfully shouting ‘Porridge! Porridge! Porridge!”  Every week for 11 years, Stanley has been delivering food assistance to vulnerable populations in remote and hard-to-reach areas in the southern region of Malawi. He has been stuck many times in the middle of nowhere, relying on the solidarity of his colleagues or local villagers to get his truck out of trouble.  He has many stories and anecdotes to share. It is true that delivering food in Malawi is not always a piece of cake. However, something has kept him going.  “When I deliver food or nutrition supplements to hospitals, I see a sigh of relief from staff and patients. This motivates me to work hard. I feel useful and proud of helping people in need,” says Stanley.  Didi Primary School lies in the middle of one of the country’s biggest tea plantations, in a remote, difficult-to-reach valley in the southern district of Thyolox. Although it is only 45 kms from the city of Blantyre, the terrain and poor conditions of the road means that it can take Stanley and three other WFP trucks about three hours to deliver bags of Corn Soy Blend, which is used to prepare school meals.  “My wife and children understand the nature of my work so they know that if I come late, after dark, it is because I’m having a hard time in the field. They have learnt to live with this fact,” Stanley says.  At Didi school, WFP — with support from USAID and USDA — provides school meals to 1,711 children.  “I got my truck stuck four times today. It rained yesterday and it is very slippery, but with my colleagues we are helping each other. We know some people are waiting for us and this gives us the strength to continue,” Stanley concludes.  WFP is the lead provider of school meals in Malawi. Under the leadership of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MoEST), the WFP-supported School Meals Programme aims to reduce hunger, improve student attendance and improve health and dietary practices in primary schools and pre-schools. In 2017, almost one million children benefited from school meals across 783 primary schools in 13 food insecure districts.  In the Photo: unsung hero, WFP Malawi truck driver Stanley Kondowe.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_20180319_W....JPG
5632 x 3755 px 47.68 x 31.79 cm 2344.00 kb
 
Malawi, district of Thyolox, 19 March 2018  “I have on more than three occasions slept on the road when my truck got stuck in the mud or when the roads were impassable due to poor conditions,” says World Food Programme (WFP) truck driver Stanley Kondowe. “But I’m always inspired every time I arrive at a school to deliver food for school meals. I’m welcomed by children joyfully shouting ‘Porridge! Porridge! Porridge!”  Every week for 11 years, Stanley has been delivering food assistance to vulnerable populations in remote and hard-to-reach areas in the southern region of Malawi. He has been stuck many times in the middle of nowhere, relying on the solidarity of his colleagues or local villagers to get his truck out of trouble.  He has many stories and anecdotes to share. It is true that delivering food in Malawi is not always a piece of cake. However, something has kept him going.  “When I deliver food or nutrition supplements to hospitals, I see a sigh of relief from staff and patients. This motivates me to work hard. I feel useful and proud of helping people in need,” says Stanley.  Didi Primary School lies in the middle of one of the country’s biggest tea plantations, in a remote, difficult-to-reach valley in the southern district of Thyolox. Although it is only 45 kms from the city of Blantyre, the terrain and poor conditions of the road means that it can take Stanley and three other WFP trucks about three hours to deliver bags of Corn Soy Blend, which is used to prepare school meals.  “My wife and children understand the nature of my work so they know that if I come late, after dark, it is because I’m having a hard time in the field. They have learnt to live with this fact,” Stanley says.  At Didi school, WFP — with support from USAID and USDA — provides school meals to 1,711 children.  “I got my truck stuck four times today. It rained yesterday and it is very slippery, but with my colleagues we are helping each other. We know some people are waiting for us and this gives us the strength to continue,” Stanley concludes.  WFP is the lead provider of school meals in Malawi. Under the leadership of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MoEST), the WFP-supported School Meals Programme aims to reduce hunger, improve student attendance and improve health and dietary practices in primary schools and pre-schools. In 2017, almost one million children benefited from school meals across 783 primary schools in 13 food insecure districts.  In the Photo: unsung hero, WFP Malawi truck driver Stanley Kondowe.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_20180319_W....JPG
6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 2855.00 kb
 
Malawi, Didi School, district of Thyolox, 19 March 2018  WFP supports education through the provision of daily meals to around 1 million schoolchildren in 900 primary and nursery schools. In 10 percent of these schools, meals are cooked from fresh foods bought from local smallholder farmers.  In the Photo: Didi Primary School lies in the middle of one of the country’s biggest tea plantations, in a remote, difficult-to-reach valley in the southern district of Thyolox.  At Didi school, WFP — with support from USAID and USDA — provides school meals to 1,711 children.  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
MLW_20180319_W....JPG
4595 x 3063 px 38.90 x 25.93 cm 2758.00 kb
 
Google Maps
Malawi, district of Thyolox, 19 March 2018  “I have on more than three occasions slept on the road when my truck got stuck in the mud or when the roads were impassable due to poor conditions,” says World Food Programme (WFP) truck driver Stanley Kondowe. “But I’m always inspired every time I arrive at a school to deliver food for school meals. I’m welcomed by children joyfully shouting ‘Porridge! Porridge! Porridge!”  Every week for 11 years, Stanley has been delivering food assistance to vulnerable populations in remote and hard-to-reach areas in the southern region of Malawi. He has been stuck many times in the middle of nowhere, relying on the solidarity of his colleagues or local villagers to get his truck out of trouble.  He has many stories and anecdotes to share. It is true that delivering food in Malawi is not always a piece of cake. However, something has kept him going.  “When I deliver food or nutrition supplements to hospitals, I see a sigh of relief from staff and patients. This motivates me to work hard. I feel useful and proud of helping people in need,” says Stanley.  Didi Primary School lies in the middle of one of the country’s biggest tea plantations, in a remote, difficult-to-reach valley in the southern district of Thyolox. Although it is only 45 kms from the city of Blantyre, the terrain and poor conditions of the road means that it can take Stanley and three other WFP trucks about three hours to deliver bags of Corn Soy Blend, which is used to prepare school meals.  “My wife and children understand the nature of my work so they know that if I come late, after dark, it is because I’m having a hard time in the field. They have learnt to live with this fact,” Stanley says.  At Didi school, WFP — with support from USAID and USDA — provides school meals to 1,711 children.  “I got my truck stuck four times today. It rained yesterday and it is very slippery, but with my colleagues we are helping each other. We know some people are waiting for us and this gives us the strength to continue,” Stanley concludes.  WFP is the lead provider of school meals in Malawi. Under the leadership of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MoEST), the WFP-supported School Meals Programme aims to reduce hunger, improve student attendance and improve health and dietary practices in primary schools and pre-schools. In 2017, almost one million children benefited from school meals across 783 primary schools in 13 food insecure districts.  In the Photo: fellow drivers try to pull Stanley’s truck stuck out of the mud  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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3992 x 2992 px 33.80 x 25.33 cm 2674.00 kb
 
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Malawi, district of Thyolox, 19 March 2018  “I have on more than three occasions slept on the road when my truck got stuck in the mud or when the roads were impassable due to poor conditions,” says World Food Programme (WFP) truck driver Stanley Kondowe. “But I’m always inspired every time I arrive at a school to deliver food for school meals. I’m welcomed by children joyfully shouting ‘Porridge! Porridge! Porridge!”  Every week for 11 years, Stanley has been delivering food assistance to vulnerable populations in remote and hard-to-reach areas in the southern region of Malawi. He has been stuck many times in the middle of nowhere, relying on the solidarity of his colleagues or local villagers to get his truck out of trouble.  He has many stories and anecdotes to share. It is true that delivering food in Malawi is not always a piece of cake. However, something has kept him going.  “When I deliver food or nutrition supplements to hospitals, I see a sigh of relief from staff and patients. This motivates me to work hard. I feel useful and proud of helping people in need,” says Stanley.  Didi Primary School lies in the middle of one of the country’s biggest tea plantations, in a remote, difficult-to-reach valley in the southern district of Thyolox. Although it is only 45 kms from the city of Blantyre, the terrain and poor conditions of the road means that it can take Stanley and three other WFP trucks about three hours to deliver bags of Corn Soy Blend, which is used to prepare school meals.  “My wife and children understand the nature of my work so they know that if I come late, after dark, it is because I’m having a hard time in the field. They have learnt to live with this fact,” Stanley says.  At Didi school, WFP — with support from USAID and USDA — provides school meals to 1,711 children.  “I got my truck stuck four times today. It rained yesterday and it is very slippery, but with my colleagues we are helping each other. We know some people are waiting for us and this gives us the strength to continue,” Stanley concludes.  WFP is the lead provider of school meals in Malawi. Under the leadership of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MoEST), the WFP-supported School Meals Programme aims to reduce hunger, improve student attendance and improve health and dietary practices in primary schools and pre-schools. In 2017, almost one million children benefited from school meals across 783 primary schools in 13 food insecure districts.  In the Photo: fellow drivers try to pull Stanley’s truck stuck out of the mud  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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3992 x 2992 px 33.80 x 25.33 cm 2556.00 kb
 
Malawi, district of Thyolox, 19 March 2018  “I have on more than three occasions slept on the road when my truck got stuck in the mud or when the roads were impassable due to poor conditions,” says World Food Programme (WFP) truck driver Stanley Kondowe. “But I’m always inspired every time I arrive at a school to deliver food for school meals. I’m welcomed by children joyfully shouting ‘Porridge! Porridge! Porridge!”  Every week for 11 years, Stanley has been delivering food assistance to vulnerable populations in remote and hard-to-reach areas in the southern region of Malawi. He has been stuck many times in the middle of nowhere, relying on the solidarity of his colleagues or local villagers to get his truck out of trouble.  He has many stories and anecdotes to share. It is true that delivering food in Malawi is not always a piece of cake. However, something has kept him going.  “When I deliver food or nutrition supplements to hospitals, I see a sigh of relief from staff and patients. This motivates me to work hard. I feel useful and proud of helping people in need,” says Stanley.  Didi Primary School lies in the middle of one of the country’s biggest tea plantations, in a remote, difficult-to-reach valley in the southern district of Thyolox. Although it is only 45 kms from the city of Blantyre, the terrain and poor conditions of the road means that it can take Stanley and three other WFP trucks about three hours to deliver bags of Corn Soy Blend, which is used to prepare school meals.  “My wife and children understand the nature of my work so they know that if I come late, after dark, it is because I’m having a hard time in the field. They have learnt to live with this fact,” Stanley says.  At Didi school, WFP — with support from USAID and USDA — provides school meals to 1,711 children.  “I got my truck stuck four times today. It rained yesterday and it is very slippery, but with my colleagues we are helping each other. We know some people are waiting for us and this gives us the strength to continue,” Stanley concludes.  WFP is the lead provider of school meals in Malawi. Under the leadership of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MoEST), the WFP-supported School Meals Programme aims to reduce hunger, improve student attendance and improve health and dietary practices in primary schools and pre-schools. In 2017, almost one million children benefited from school meals across 783 primary schools in 13 food insecure districts.  In the Photo: fellow drivers try to pull Stanley’s truck stuck out of the mud  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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6000 x 4000 px 50.80 x 33.87 cm 2896.00 kb
 
Malawi, district of Thyolox, 19 March 2018  “I have on more than three occasions slept on the road when my truck got stuck in the mud or when the roads were impassable due to poor conditions,” says World Food Programme (WFP) truck driver Stanley Kondowe. “But I’m always inspired every time I arrive at a school to deliver food for school meals. I’m welcomed by children joyfully shouting ‘Porridge! Porridge! Porridge!”  Every week for 11 years, Stanley has been delivering food assistance to vulnerable populations in remote and hard-to-reach areas in the southern region of Malawi. He has been stuck many times in the middle of nowhere, relying on the solidarity of his colleagues or local villagers to get his truck out of trouble.  He has many stories and anecdotes to share. It is true that delivering food in Malawi is not always a piece of cake. However, something has kept him going.  “When I deliver food or nutrition supplements to hospitals, I see a sigh of relief from staff and patients. This motivates me to work hard. I feel useful and proud of helping people in need,” says Stanley.  Didi Primary School lies in the middle of one of the country’s biggest tea plantations, in a remote, difficult-to-reach valley in the southern district of Thyolox. Although it is only 45 kms from the city of Blantyre, the terrain and poor conditions of the road means that it can take Stanley and three other WFP trucks about three hours to deliver bags of Corn Soy Blend, which is used to prepare school meals.  “My wife and children understand the nature of my work so they know that if I come late, after dark, it is because I’m having a hard time in the field. They have learnt to live with this fact,” Stanley says.  At Didi school, WFP — with support from USAID and USDA — provides school meals to 1,711 children.  “I got my truck stuck four times today. It rained yesterday and it is very slippery, but with my colleagues we are helping each other. We know some people are waiting for us and this gives us the strength to continue,” Stanley concludes.  WFP is the lead provider of school meals in Malawi. Under the leadership of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MoEST), the WFP-supported School Meals Programme aims to reduce hunger, improve student attendance and improve health and dietary practices in primary schools and pre-schools. In 2017, almost one million children benefited from school meals across 783 primary schools in 13 food insecure districts.  In the Photo: fellow drivers try to pull Stanley’s truck stuck out of the mud  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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4967 x 3311 px 42.05 x 28.03 cm 3008.00 kb
 
Malawi, district of Thyolox, 19 March 2018  “I have on more than three occasions slept on the road when my truck got stuck in the mud or when the roads were impassable due to poor conditions,” says World Food Programme (WFP) truck driver Stanley Kondowe. “But I’m always inspired every time I arrive at a school to deliver food for school meals. I’m welcomed by children joyfully shouting ‘Porridge! Porridge! Porridge!”  Every week for 11 years, Stanley has been delivering food assistance to vulnerable populations in remote and hard-to-reach areas in the southern region of Malawi. He has been stuck many times in the middle of nowhere, relying on the solidarity of his colleagues or local villagers to get his truck out of trouble.  He has many stories and anecdotes to share. It is true that delivering food in Malawi is not always a piece of cake. However, something has kept him going.  “When I deliver food or nutrition supplements to hospitals, I see a sigh of relief from staff and patients. This motivates me to work hard. I feel useful and proud of helping people in need,” says Stanley.  Didi Primary School lies in the middle of one of the country’s biggest tea plantations, in a remote, difficult-to-reach valley in the southern district of Thyolox. Although it is only 45 kms from the city of Blantyre, the terrain and poor conditions of the road means that it can take Stanley and three other WFP trucks about three hours to deliver bags of Corn Soy Blend, which is used to prepare school meals.  “My wife and children understand the nature of my work so they know that if I come late, after dark, it is because I’m having a hard time in the field. They have learnt to live with this fact,” Stanley says.  At Didi school, WFP — with support from USAID and USDA — provides school meals to 1,711 children.  “I got my truck stuck four times today. It rained yesterday and it is very slippery, but with my colleagues we are helping each other. We know some people are waiting for us and this gives us the strength to continue,” Stanley concludes.  WFP is the lead provider of school meals in Malawi. Under the leadership of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MoEST), the WFP-supported School Meals Programme aims to reduce hunger, improve student attendance and improve health and dietary practices in primary schools and pre-schools. In 2017, almost one million children benefited from school meals across 783 primary schools in 13 food insecure districts.  In the Photo: fellow drivers try to pull Stanley’s truck stuck out of the mud  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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Malawi, district of Thyolox, 19 March 2018  “I have on more than three occasions slept on the road when my truck got stuck in the mud or when the roads were impassable due to poor conditions,” says World Food Programme (WFP) truck driver Stanley Kondowe. “But I’m always inspired every time I arrive at a school to deliver food for school meals. I’m welcomed by children joyfully shouting ‘Porridge! Porridge! Porridge!”  Every week for 11 years, Stanley has been delivering food assistance to vulnerable populations in remote and hard-to-reach areas in the southern region of Malawi. He has been stuck many times in the middle of nowhere, relying on the solidarity of his colleagues or local villagers to get his truck out of trouble.  He has many stories and anecdotes to share. It is true that delivering food in Malawi is not always a piece of cake. However, something has kept him going.  “When I deliver food or nutrition supplements to hospitals, I see a sigh of relief from staff and patients. This motivates me to work hard. I feel useful and proud of helping people in need,” says Stanley.  Didi Primary School lies in the middle of one of the country’s biggest tea plantations, in a remote, difficult-to-reach valley in the southern district of Thyolox. Although it is only 45 kms from the city of Blantyre, the terrain and poor conditions of the road means that it can take Stanley and three other WFP trucks about three hours to deliver bags of Corn Soy Blend, which is used to prepare school meals.  “My wife and children understand the nature of my work so they know that if I come late, after dark, it is because I’m having a hard time in the field. They have learnt to live with this fact,” Stanley says.  At Didi school, WFP — with support from USAID and USDA — provides school meals to 1,711 children.  “I got my truck stuck four times today. It rained yesterday and it is very slippery, but with my colleagues we are helping each other. We know some people are waiting for us and this gives us the strength to continue,” Stanley concludes.  WFP is the lead provider of school meals in Malawi. Under the leadership of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MoEST), the WFP-supported School Meals Programme aims to reduce hunger, improve student attendance and improve health and dietary practices in primary schools and pre-schools. In 2017, almost one million children benefited from school meals across 783 primary schools in 13 food insecure districts.  In the Photo: fellow drivers try to pull Stanley’s truck stuck out of the mud  Photo: WFP/Badre Bahaji
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