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Bangladesh, Balukhali refugee camp, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
5954 x 3969 px 210.04 x 140.02 cm 6873.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Balukhali refugee camp, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 6505.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Balukhali refugee camp, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 9275.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Balukhali refugee camp, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
5975 x 3983 px 210.78 x 140.51 cm 7087.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
5957 x 3971 px 210.15 x 140.09 cm 5631.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
6240 x 4160 px 220.13 x 146.76 cm 7437.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
5508 x 3672 px 194.31 x 129.54 cm 3927.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
BGD_20180504_W....JPG
6720 x 4480 px 237.07 x 158.04 cm 6005.00 kb
 
Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar, 04 May 2018  World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh and being a woman in the male-dominated world of engineering.  "As the rains have already started, we are working around the clock to improve the safety and accessibility of the camps. My job was to design and construct a new logistics hub close to the camp and I was one of the first engineers in a joint UNHCR, IOM and WFP project to prepare land to be used for shelter.  I am also part of the WFP Engineering team which is building bridges and roads, fortifying embankments and clearing drainage channels. We are working to ensure we will be able to reach all refugees if and when the refugee sites become inaccessible during the monsoon. New distribution points for food and non-food items are being set up to make sure nobody is left behind.  Considering the danger of flooding, and knowing how densely populated the camps are, we need to ensure the food can reach refugees even in the worst case scenario. To do this, building a Bailey bridge is our best option. It is simply the fastest and sturdiest construction in these emergencies. It takes seven days to put up this bridge, which has just arrived from the UK. We have 50 site workers to clear the ground and build a platform to launch the bridge. I call this a ‘Lego’ bridge because of the way it is assembled. You build the nose and you launch it to the other side. It will enable the crossing of trucks carrying 5 mt of supplies.  In March this year, the Government of Bangladesh allocated 800 acres of land to safely relocate an estimated 30,000 refugees. However, this includes hills, valleys and steep slopes — only a small portion of it is workable and can be turned into usable land. We started in December 2017 by looking at the resources, the constraints and the opportunities. We found out what we could source locally in the time that we had. And then we just got down to work.  Doing the layouts from WFP’s Headquarters in Rome, everything is theoretical. Then, once you see the camps first-hand and reality sets in, it is overwhelming. I was struck by the amount of children, the vastness and the absence of greenery. Sometimes you can drive a whole day and only see one tree. We are facing many challenges — time, resources, heavy rain, will the concrete be ready for launching the bridge? Do we have a plan B? As an engineer you always have a plan B — and a plan C, and even D. Things don’t always go as planned. But I am a skilled adapter, designer and problem solver. It is my job to find solutions.  Many construction projects in our line of work are in developing countries — the terrain is tough and so is working in places where women are not even visible.  As a woman, I feel I have empathy with the communities we work with and this makes a huge difference. When I arrive on the ground, my first priority is to listen to the people as well as to the contractors, to understand what they need, what they want and how we can work best together. Just today, I was sitting with the workers in the new logistics hub we are building in the Kutupalong mega camp. They brought me cold water and, through my translator, told me about their families and their children — this creates a connection.   In the Photo: World Food Programme (WFP) engineer Daniela Villar (left) on monsoon preparations in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Women humanitarian engineers are standing their ground in a traditionally male-dominated environment.   Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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Bangladesh, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 21 March 2018.  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Children collect firewood in the forest for their families to be able to cook and eat. Haris is only 11 years old but most days he has to walk 3-4 hours and carry bags of wood that weight 15kg while his mother receives food rations from WFP. Unfortunately, this supply only lasts two days and then he has to go back again, waking up at 7am and doing the long journey bare foot, alone and without food or water nearby.  Being only 11 and after having experienced the trauma that the Rohingya community has witnessed, Haris does not wish for clothes or toys. When asked, Haris said that “it would be nice to have gas stoves so then I would not have to worry each day about finding a firewood source.”  In the Photo: Haris, a 11 years old Rohingya refugee.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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Bangladesh, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 21 March 2018.  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Children collect firewood in the forest for their families to be able to cook and eat. Haris is only 11 years old but most days he has to walk 3-4 hours and carry bags of wood that weight 15kg while his mother receives food rations from WFP. Unfortunately, this supply only lasts two days and then he has to go back again, waking up at 7am and doing the long journey bare foot, alone and without food or water nearby.  Being only 11 and after having experienced the trauma that the Rohingya community has witnessed, Haris does not wish for clothes or toys. When asked, Haris said that “it would be nice to have gas stoves so then I would not have to worry each day about finding a firewood source.”  In the Photo: Haris, a 11 years old Rohingya refugee.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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Bangladesh, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 21 March 2018.  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Children collect firewood in the forest for their families to be able to cook and eat. Haris is only 11 years old but most days he has to walk 3-4 hours and carry bags of wood that weight 15kg while his mother receives food rations from WFP. Unfortunately, this supply only lasts two days and then he has to go back again, waking up at 7am and doing the long journey bare foot, alone and without food or water nearby.  Being only 11 and after having experienced the trauma that the Rohingya community has witnessed, Haris does not wish for clothes or toys. When asked, Haris said that “it would be nice to have gas stoves so then I would not have to worry each day about finding a firewood source.”  In the Photo: Haris, a 11 years old Rohingya refugee.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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Bangladesh, Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. 21 March 2018.  The recent violence in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State has led to mass population displacement. Hundreds of thousands of people have found refuge in makeshift settlements in the area of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where they live in extremely precarious and deteriorating conditions.  Children collect firewood in the forest for their families to be able to cook and eat. Haris is only 11 years old but most days he has to walk 3-4 hours and carry bags of wood that weight 15kg while his mother receives food rations from WFP. Unfortunately, this supply only lasts two days and then he has to go back again, waking up at 7am and doing the long journey bare foot, alone and without food or water nearby.  Being only 11 and after having experienced the trauma that the Rohingya community has witnessed, Haris does not wish for clothes or toys. When asked, Haris said that “it would be nice to have gas stoves so then I would not have to worry each day about finding a firewood source.”  In the Photo: Haris, a 11 years old Rohingya refugee.  Photo: WFP/Saikat Mojumder
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Nigeria, Maiduguri, Borno State, 13 March 2018  Calvin Apire is from the northern district of Kitgum in Uganda. He attended secondary school at St. Joseph’s College Layibi in nearby Gulu District, where between 1984 and 1986, he participated in the ‘School Garden Programme’, which was linked to the World Food Programme (WFP)’s school meals intervention.  As a member of the school’s Young Farmers Association, Calvin learned how to grow maize and beans to support the food needs of his school. WFP supplemented their efforts by providing additional nutritious foods, such as canned fish, chicken and beef, as well as powdered milk, sugar, and rice.  “Receiving nutritious food was a strong incentive for me to stay in school and focus on learning. It was only at school that I could get that standard of food,” says Calvin. “There are many children around the world that fail to pursue effective learning because they either don’t have anything or enough to eat.”  After completing secondary school, and at the onset of a decades-long conflict in northern Uganda, Calvin turned to small scale farming. To this day, he maintains a small farm that yields produce for his wife and three children. “When school feeding is well executed, it serves as an engine that positively drives the future of a country,” Calvin says.  In 2000 as the conflict intensified, and the need for humanitarian assistance in northern Uganda increased, Calvin’s earlier exposure to WFP’s school feeding programme fuelled his resolve to join the organization’s efforts. He started with WFP in October of that year, as a Procurement Assistant.  “There is nothing as exciting as working for the World Food Programme… I get to meet the people we serve and see how happy they are about what we do, which gives me all the satisfaction I need.”  “WFP’s school feeding programme also imbibed humanitarian values in me. I started to recognise the importance of giving hope to the vulnerable,” says Calvin who is currently Procurement Officer within the Supply Chain Unit at WFP in Nigeria.  Throughout the course of his career, he has supported the organization in buying food in emergency situations and has connected smallholder farmers with markets through Purchase for Progress (P4P) in countries including Liberia, Afghanistan, and South Africa, among many others. “I enjoy working in Supply Chain because I like seeing the effective and efficient movement of food assistance from the source to the beneficiaries,” says Calvin.  “I thank WFP for the impact the organization had in my life as a school child and for later giving me the opportunity to play a role in saving and changing lives. There is nothing as exciting as working for the World Food Programme… I get to meet the people we serve and see how happy they are about what we do, which gives me all the satisfaction I need,” says Calvin.  In the Photo: Calvin visiting retailers in Maiduguri, Nigeria.  Photo: WFP/ Ladi Eguche
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Nigeria, Maiduguri, Borno State, 13 March 2018  Calvin Apire is from the northern district of Kitgum in Uganda. He attended secondary school at St. Joseph’s College Layibi in nearby Gulu District, where between 1984 and 1986, he participated in the ‘School Garden Programme’, which was linked to the World Food Programme (WFP)’s school meals intervention.  As a member of the school’s Young Farmers Association, Calvin learned how to grow maize and beans to support the food needs of his school. WFP supplemented their efforts by providing additional nutritious foods, such as canned fish, chicken and beef, as well as powdered milk, sugar, and rice.  “Receiving nutritious food was a strong incentive for me to stay in school and focus on learning. It was only at school that I could get that standard of food,” says Calvin. “There are many children around the world that fail to pursue effective learning because they either don’t have anything or enough to eat.”  After completing secondary school, and at the onset of a decades-long conflict in northern Uganda, Calvin turned to small scale farming. To this day, he maintains a small farm that yields produce for his wife and three children. “When school feeding is well executed, it serves as an engine that positively drives the future of a country,” Calvin says.  In 2000 as the conflict intensified, and the need for humanitarian assistance in northern Uganda increased, Calvin’s earlier exposure to WFP’s school feeding programme fuelled his resolve to join the organization’s efforts. He started with WFP in October of that year, as a Procurement Assistant.  “There is nothing as exciting as working for the World Food Programme… I get to meet the people we serve and see how happy they are about what we do, which gives me all the satisfaction I need.”  “WFP’s school feeding programme also imbibed humanitarian values in me. I started to recognise the importance of giving hope to the vulnerable,” says Calvin who is currently Procurement Officer within the Supply Chain Unit at WFP in Nigeria.  Throughout the course of his career, he has supported the organization in buying food in emergency situations and has connected smallholder farmers with markets through Purchase for Progress (P4P) in countries including Liberia, Afghanistan, and South Africa, among many others. “I enjoy working in Supply Chain because I like seeing the effective and efficient movement of food assistance from the source to the beneficiaries,” says Calvin.  “I thank WFP for the impact the organization had in my life as a school child and for later giving me the opportunity to play a role in saving and changing lives. There is nothing as exciting as working for the World Food Programme… I get to meet the people we serve and see how happy they are about what we do, which gives me all the satisfaction I need,” says Calvin.  In the Photo: Calvin visiting retailers in Maiduguri, Nigeria.  Photo: WFP/ Ladi Eguche
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Nigeria, Maiduguri, Borno State, 13 March 2018  Calvin Apire is from the northern district of Kitgum in Uganda. He attended secondary school at St. Joseph’s College Layibi in nearby Gulu District, where between 1984 and 1986, he participated in the ‘School Garden Programme’, which was linked to the World Food Programme (WFP)’s school meals intervention.  As a member of the school’s Young Farmers Association, Calvin learned how to grow maize and beans to support the food needs of his school. WFP supplemented their efforts by providing additional nutritious foods, such as canned fish, chicken and beef, as well as powdered milk, sugar, and rice.  “Receiving nutritious food was a strong incentive for me to stay in school and focus on learning. It was only at school that I could get that standard of food,” says Calvin. “There are many children around the world that fail to pursue effective learning because they either don’t have anything or enough to eat.”  After completing secondary school, and at the onset of a decades-long conflict in northern Uganda, Calvin turned to small scale farming. To this day, he maintains a small farm that yields produce for his wife and three children. “When school feeding is well executed, it serves as an engine that positively drives the future of a country,” Calvin says.  In 2000 as the conflict intensified, and the need for humanitarian assistance in northern Uganda increased, Calvin’s earlier exposure to WFP’s school feeding programme fuelled his resolve to join the organization’s efforts. He started with WFP in October of that year, as a Procurement Assistant.  “There is nothing as exciting as working for the World Food Programme… I get to meet the people we serve and see how happy they are about what we do, which gives me all the satisfaction I need.”  “WFP’s school feeding programme also imbibed humanitarian values in me. I started to recognise the importance of giving hope to the vulnerable,” says Calvin who is currently Procurement Officer within the Supply Chain Unit at WFP in Nigeria.  Throughout the course of his career, he has supported the organization in buying food in emergency situations and has connected smallholder farmers with markets through Purchase for Progress (P4P) in countries including Liberia, Afghanistan, and South Africa, among many others. “I enjoy working in Supply Chain because I like seeing the effective and efficient movement of food assistance from the source to the beneficiaries,” says Calvin.  “I thank WFP for the impact the organization had in my life as a school child and for later giving me the opportunity to play a role in saving and changing lives. There is nothing as exciting as working for the World Food Programme… I get to meet the people we serve and see how happy they are about what we do, which gives me all the satisfaction I need,” says Calvin.  In the Photo: Calvin visiting retailers in Maiduguri, Nigeria.  Photo: WFP/ Ladi Eguche
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Nigeria, Maiduguri, Borno State, 13 March 2018  Calvin Apire is from the northern district of Kitgum in Uganda. He attended secondary school at St. Joseph’s College Layibi in nearby Gulu District, where between 1984 and 1986, he participated in the ‘School Garden Programme’, which was linked to the World Food Programme (WFP)’s school meals intervention.  As a member of the school’s Young Farmers Association, Calvin learned how to grow maize and beans to support the food needs of his school. WFP supplemented their efforts by providing additional nutritious foods, such as canned fish, chicken and beef, as well as powdered milk, sugar, and rice.  “Receiving nutritious food was a strong incentive for me to stay in school and focus on learning. It was only at school that I could get that standard of food,” says Calvin. “There are many children around the world that fail to pursue effective learning because they either don’t have anything or enough to eat.”  After completing secondary school, and at the onset of a decades-long conflict in northern Uganda, Calvin turned to small scale farming. To this day, he maintains a small farm that yields produce for his wife and three children. “When school feeding is well executed, it serves as an engine that positively drives the future of a country,” Calvin says.  In 2000 as the conflict intensified, and the need for humanitarian assistance in northern Uganda increased, Calvin’s earlier exposure to WFP’s school feeding programme fuelled his resolve to join the organization’s efforts. He started with WFP in October of that year, as a Procurement Assistant.  “There is nothing as exciting as working for the World Food Programme… I get to meet the people we serve and see how happy they are about what we do, which gives me all the satisfaction I need.”  “WFP’s school feeding programme also imbibed humanitarian values in me. I started to recognise the importance of giving hope to the vulnerable,” says Calvin who is currently Procurement Officer within the Supply Chain Unit at WFP in Nigeria.  Throughout the course of his career, he has supported the organization in buying food in emergency situations and has connected smallholder farmers with markets through Purchase for Progress (P4P) in countries including Liberia, Afghanistan, and South Africa, among many others. “I enjoy working in Supply Chain because I like seeing the effective and efficient movement of food assistance from the source to the beneficiaries,” says Calvin.  “I thank WFP for the impact the organization had in my life as a school child and for later giving me the opportunity to play a role in saving and changing lives. There is nothing as exciting as working for the World Food Programme… I get to meet the people we serve and see how happy they are about what we do, which gives me all the satisfaction I need,” says Calvin.  In the Photo: Calvin visiting retailers in Maiduguri, Nigeria.  Photo: WFP/ Ladi Eguche
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Kyrgyzstan, Novopokrovka, Chui Province. 12 March 2018.  WFP has created a sustainable, cost-effective model which the Government has replicated to further expand the reach of the programme, currently covering 450 primary schools across the country. Every day, children receive one hot, nutritious meal comprising soups or cereal porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. WFP provides fortified wheat for the meals as well as technical assistance and trainings for school cooks.  The Kyrgyz Minister of Education, the Russian Ambassador and the WFP Country Director have visited the Novopokrovka School to symbolically launch a new phase of the School Meals Optimization Project. Thanks to the funding from the Russian Federation, WFP would scale up its school meals activities to over 50% of Kyrgyz schools. With new funding, WFP will continue investing in renovating canteens, providing schools with kitchen equipment, training school chefs and helping schools to establish vegetable gardens as source for their own fresh fruits and vegetables.   In the Photo: Children at the Novopokrovka School in Kyrgyzstan.  Photo: WFP/Olga Niazalieva
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Kyrgyzstan, Novopokrovka, Chui Province. 12 March 2018.  WFP has created a sustainable, cost-effective model which the Government has replicated to further expand the reach of the programme, currently covering 450 primary schools across the country. Every day, children receive one hot, nutritious meal comprising soups or cereal porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. WFP provides fortified wheat for the meals as well as technical assistance and trainings for school cooks.  The Kyrgyz Minister of Education, the Russian Ambassador and the WFP Country Director have visited the Novopokrovka School to symbolically launch a new phase of the School Meals Optimization Project. Thanks to the funding from the Russian Federation, WFP would scale up its school meals activities to over 50% of Kyrgyz schools. With new funding, WFP will continue investing in renovating canteens, providing schools with kitchen equipment, training school chefs and helping schools to establish vegetable gardens as source for their own fresh fruits and vegetables.   In the Photo: Children at the Novopokrovka School in Kyrgyzstan.  Photo: WFP/Olga Niazalieva
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Kyrgyzstan, Novopokrovka, Chui Province. 12 March 2018.  WFP has created a sustainable, cost-effective model which the Government has replicated to further expand the reach of the programme, currently covering 450 primary schools across the country. Every day, children receive one hot, nutritious meal comprising soups or cereal porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. WFP provides fortified wheat for the meals as well as technical assistance and trainings for school cooks.  The Kyrgyz Minister of Education, the Russian Ambassador and the WFP Country Director have visited the Novopokrovka School to symbolically launch a new phase of the School Meals Optimization Project. Thanks to the funding from the Russian Federation, WFP would scale up its school meals activities to over 50% of Kyrgyz schools. With new funding, WFP will continue investing in renovating canteens, providing schools with kitchen equipment, training school chefs and helping schools to establish vegetable gardens as source for their own fresh fruits and vegetables.   In the Photo: Children at the Novopokrovka School in Kyrgyzstan.  Photo: WFP/Olga Niazalieva
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Kyrgyzstan, Novopokrovka, Chui Province. 12 March 2018.  WFP has created a sustainable, cost-effective model which the Government has replicated to further expand the reach of the programme, currently covering 450 primary schools across the country. Every day, children receive one hot, nutritious meal comprising soups or cereal porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. WFP provides fortified wheat for the meals as well as technical assistance and trainings for school cooks.  The Kyrgyz Minister of Education, the Russian Ambassador and the WFP Country Director have visited the Novopokrovka School to symbolically launch a new phase of the School Meals Optimization Project. Thanks to the funding from the Russian Federation, WFP would scale up its school meals activities to over 50% of Kyrgyz schools. With new funding, WFP will continue investing in renovating canteens, providing schools with kitchen equipment, training school chefs and helping schools to establish vegetable gardens as source for their own fresh fruits and vegetables.   In the Photo: Children at the Novopokrovka School in Kyrgyzstan.  Photo: WFP/Olga Niazalieva
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Kyrgyzstan, Novopokrovka, Chui Province. 12 March 2018.  WFP has created a sustainable, cost-effective model which the Government has replicated to further expand the reach of the programme, currently covering 450 primary schools across the country. Every day, children receive one hot, nutritious meal comprising soups or cereal porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. WFP provides fortified wheat for the meals as well as technical assistance and trainings for school cooks.  The Kyrgyz Minister of Education, the Russian Ambassador and the WFP Country Director have visited the Novopokrovka School to symbolically launch a new phase of the School Meals Optimization Project. Thanks to the funding from the Russian Federation, WFP would scale up its school meals activities to over 50% of Kyrgyz schools. With new funding, WFP will continue investing in renovating canteens, providing schools with kitchen equipment, training school chefs and helping schools to establish vegetable gardens as source for their own fresh fruits and vegetables.   In the Photo: Children at the Novopokrovka School in Kyrgyzstan.  Photo: WFP/Olga Niazalieva
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Kyrgyzstan, Novopokrovka, Chui Province. 12 March 2018.  WFP has created a sustainable, cost-effective model which the Government has replicated to further expand the reach of the programme, currently covering 450 primary schools across the country. Every day, children receive one hot, nutritious meal comprising soups or cereal porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. WFP provides fortified wheat for the meals as well as technical assistance and trainings for school cooks.  The Kyrgyz Minister of Education, the Russian Ambassador and the WFP Country Director have visited the Novopokrovka School to symbolically launch a new phase of the School Meals Optimization Project. Thanks to the funding from the Russian Federation, WFP would scale up its school meals activities to over 50% of Kyrgyz schools. With new funding, WFP will continue investing in renovating canteens, providing schools with kitchen equipment, training school chefs and helping schools to establish vegetable gardens as source for their own fresh fruits and vegetables.   In the Photo: Children at the Novopokrovka School in Kyrgyzstan.  Photo: WFP/Olga Niazalieva
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Kyrgyzstan, Novopokrovka, Chui Province. 12 March 2018.  WFP has created a sustainable, cost-effective model which the Government has replicated to further expand the reach of the programme, currently covering 450 primary schools across the country. Every day, children receive one hot, nutritious meal comprising soups or cereal porridges, fresh pastries and vitamin-rich drinks. WFP provides fortified wheat for the meals as well as technical assistance and trainings for school cooks.  The Kyrgyz Minister of Education, the Russian Ambassador and the WFP Country Director have visited the Novopokrovka School to symbolically launch a new phase of the School Meals Optimization Project. Thanks to the funding from the Russian Federation, WFP would scale up its school meals activities to over 50% of Kyrgyz schools. With new funding, WFP will continue investing in renovating canteens, providing schools with kitchen equipment, training school chefs and helping schools to establish vegetable gardens as source for their own fresh fruits and vegetables.   In the Photo: Children at the Novopokrovka School in Kyrgyzstan.  Photo: WFP/Olga Niazalieva
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