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Yemen, Sana'a, 24 July 2017  Walid Abdel Malek is young, polite and courteous. Despite some very tough years, he gracefully cruises through hardship keeping a brave face for the sake of his wife and three daughters. He cannot afford rent or a lot of food for his family, but his daughters look at him in awe. “They know our situation, they rarely ask for anything,” he says. “If one of them wanted something and I said I had no money, they accept and just walk away.” The law school graduate and his family were evicted from their rented houses twice after failing to pay the rent. Now, they live in a humble house in the Bani al-Harith district, north of Sana’a. The landlord has allowed them to stay there for free.  Originally from Taiz in central Yemen, Walid had been working in Sana’a before war broke out more than two years ago. Fearing for the life of his family, with conflict most intense in their area, he brought them all to Sana’a. Walid, a government employee, has not been paid for the past ten months. Millions of public employees have not received their full salaries since September 2016. His family, like the millions of Yemenis who are dependent on these salaries, no longer have a sustainable source of income. “I never wake them up. If I wake them up they would say they wanted to eat dinner.” The family now lives on a small income he makes working as a taxi driver on a rented car, which he struggles to pay the rent for every month. “We’ve been through some rough months, we had nothing in the house — no furniture, no food and no money,” he says. “Sometimes I would stay late for work and when I come home and find [the children] sleeping, I say to myself ‘let them sleep until the morning’. I never wake them up. If I wake them up they would say they wanted to eat dinner,” he says. “In the morning, the neighbours would usually bring us bread or something.”  The family depend almost entirely on the food assistance they receive from the World Food Programme. Since they are displaced, they receive a ration of wheat flour, pulses and oil, which keeps them stocked for a good part of the month. “Today is the end of the month, we do not have much food left now but at least we do know that some help will be on the way soon,” he says, as his wife prepares lunch. When there is no money and their food assistance has run out, they depend on the generosity of their neighbours.  As Walid’s family set up lunch, they are keen on inviting their guests to share the small, humble meal that is barely enough for their family of five. “We have very little, but it’s enough to keep us going,” he says.  In the Photo: Walid and his two eldest daughters having a simple lunch of bread, rice and a traditional Yemeni vegetable dish, Salta.    Photo: WFP/Marco Frattini
YEM_20170724_W....JPG
6144 x 4096 px 78.03 x 52.02 cm 6808.00 kb
 
Yemen, Sana'a, 24 July 2017  Walid Abdel Malek is young, polite and courteous. Despite some very tough years, he gracefully cruises through hardship keeping a brave face for the sake of his wife and three daughters. He cannot afford rent or a lot of food for his family, but his daughters look at him in awe. “They know our situation, they rarely ask for anything,” he says. “If one of them wanted something and I said I had no money, they accept and just walk away.” The law school graduate and his family were evicted from their rented houses twice after failing to pay the rent. Now, they live in a humble house in the Bani al-Harith district, north of Sana’a. The landlord has allowed them to stay there for free.  Originally from Taiz in central Yemen, Walid had been working in Sana’a before war broke out more than two years ago. Fearing for the life of his family, with conflict most intense in their area, he brought them all to Sana’a. Walid, a government employee, has not been paid for the past ten months. Millions of public employees have not received their full salaries since September 2016. His family, like the millions of Yemenis who are dependent on these salaries, no longer have a sustainable source of income. “I never wake them up. If I wake them up they would say they wanted to eat dinner.” The family now lives on a small income he makes working as a taxi driver on a rented car, which he struggles to pay the rent for every month. “We’ve been through some rough months, we had nothing in the house — no furniture, no food and no money,” he says. “Sometimes I would stay late for work and when I come home and find [the children] sleeping, I say to myself ‘let them sleep until the morning’. I never wake them up. If I wake them up they would say they wanted to eat dinner,” he says. “In the morning, the neighbours would usually bring us bread or something.”  The family depend almost entirely on the food assistance they receive from the World Food Programme. Since they are displaced, they receive a ration of wheat flour, pulses and oil, which keeps them stocked for a good part of the month. “Today is the end of the month, we do not have much food left now but at least we do know that some help will be on the way soon,” he says, as his wife prepares lunch. When there is no money and their food assistance has run out, they depend on the generosity of their neighbours.  As Walid’s family set up lunch, they are keen on inviting their guests to share the small, humble meal that is barely enough for their family of five. “We have very little, but it’s enough to keep us going,” he says.  In the Photo: Walid’s graduation photo (right), propped up on a shelf in an old closet that his neighbours gave him  Photo: WFP/Marco Frattini
YEM_20170724_W....JPG
6144 x 4096 px 78.03 x 52.02 cm 6220.00 kb
 
Syria, Lattakia, 24 July 2017

From the onset of the Syrian crisis in 2011, WFP has been on the frontlines doing whatever it takes to deliver food to millions of people who need it. WFP is also implementing activities that aim to promote and restore livelihoods and food security with a long-term resilience-building goal.   WFP implements activities to address the specific nutritional needs of vulnerable groups, including in children below the age of 5 as well as pregnant and nursing women. This includes programmes to prevent and treat acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies as well as a cash-based-transfer programme that allows pregnant women and nursing mothers to buy fresh food such as vegetables, dairy and meat, in order to increase their dietary diversity.  In the photo (from left to right): Muntaha, Nadia (11 months) and Rashid.  Nadia's mother, Muntaha, is 8 months pregnant and her family receives food from WFP through the pregnant and nursing women voucher program. Muntaha is Syrian Turkmenistan and her Arabic is a bit difficult.   Rashid and Muntaha got married in Jdaida village in rural Jisr El-Shughour in Idleb, they fled their home due to the ongoing clashes. Rashid arrived in Lattakia almost two years ago, he used to be a singer earning well enough to live in good conditions. He also know how to fix Satellite receivers which is his own source of income for the time being.  Photo: WFP/Hussam Al Saleh
SYR_20170724_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 7071.00 kb
 
Yemen, Sana'a, 24 July 2017  Walid Abdel Malek is young, polite and courteous. Despite some very tough years, he gracefully cruises through hardship keeping a brave face for the sake of his wife and three daughters. He cannot afford rent or a lot of food for his family, but his daughters look at him in awe. “They know our situation, they rarely ask for anything,” he says. “If one of them wanted something and I said I had no money, they accept and just walk away.” The law school graduate and his family were evicted from their rented houses twice after failing to pay the rent. Now, they live in a humble house in the Bani al-Harith district, north of Sana’a. The landlord has allowed them to stay there for free.  Originally from Taiz in central Yemen, Walid had been working in Sana’a before war broke out more than two years ago. Fearing for the life of his family, with conflict most intense in their area, he brought them all to Sana’a. Walid, a government employee, has not been paid for the past ten months. Millions of public employees have not received their full salaries since September 2016. His family, like the millions of Yemenis who are dependent on these salaries, no longer have a sustainable source of income. “I never wake them up. If I wake them up they would say they wanted to eat dinner.” The family now lives on a small income he makes working as a taxi driver on a rented car, which he struggles to pay the rent for every month. “We’ve been through some rough months, we had nothing in the house — no furniture, no food and no money,” he says. “Sometimes I would stay late for work and when I come home and find [the children] sleeping, I say to myself ‘let them sleep until the morning’. I never wake them up. If I wake them up they would say they wanted to eat dinner,” he says. “In the morning, the neighbours would usually bring us bread or something.”  The family depend almost entirely on the food assistance they receive from the World Food Programme. Since they are displaced, they receive a ration of wheat flour, pulses and oil, which keeps them stocked for a good part of the month. “Today is the end of the month, we do not have much food left now but at least we do know that some help will be on the way soon,” he says, as his wife prepares lunch. When there is no money and their food assistance has run out, they depend on the generosity of their neighbours.  As Walid’s family set up lunch, they are keen on inviting their guests to share the small, humble meal that is barely enough for their family of five. “We have very little, but it’s enough to keep us going,” he says.  In the Photo: Walid’s oldest daughter, 10-year-old Sondos, looks up at him in admiration.  Photo: WFP/Marco Frattini
YEM_20170724_W....JPG
6144 x 4096 px 78.03 x 52.02 cm 7095.00 kb
 
Yemen, Sana'a, 24 July 2017  Walid Abdel Malek is young, polite and courteous. Despite some very tough years, he gracefully cruises through hardship keeping a brave face for the sake of his wife and three daughters. He cannot afford rent or a lot of food for his family, but his daughters look at him in awe. “They know our situation, they rarely ask for anything,” he says. “If one of them wanted something and I said I had no money, they accept and just walk away.” The law school graduate and his family were evicted from their rented houses twice after failing to pay the rent. Now, they live in a humble house in the Bani al-Harith district, north of Sana’a. The landlord has allowed them to stay there for free.  Originally from Taiz in central Yemen, Walid had been working in Sana’a before war broke out more than two years ago. Fearing for the life of his family, with conflict most intense in their area, he brought them all to Sana’a. Walid, a government employee, has not been paid for the past ten months. Millions of public employees have not received their full salaries since September 2016. His family, like the millions of Yemenis who are dependent on these salaries, no longer have a sustainable source of income. “I never wake them up. If I wake them up they would say they wanted to eat dinner.” The family now lives on a small income he makes working as a taxi driver on a rented car, which he struggles to pay the rent for every month. “We’ve been through some rough months, we had nothing in the house — no furniture, no food and no money,” he says. “Sometimes I would stay late for work and when I come home and find [the children] sleeping, I say to myself ‘let them sleep until the morning’. I never wake them up. If I wake them up they would say they wanted to eat dinner,” he says. “In the morning, the neighbours would usually bring us bread or something.”  The family depend almost entirely on the food assistance they receive from the World Food Programme. Since they are displaced, they receive a ration of wheat flour, pulses and oil, which keeps them stocked for a good part of the month. “Today is the end of the month, we do not have much food left now but at least we do know that some help will be on the way soon,” he says, as his wife prepares lunch. When there is no money and their food assistance has run out, they depend on the generosity of their neighbours.  As Walid’s family set up lunch, they are keen on inviting their guests to share the small, humble meal that is barely enough for their family of five. “We have very little, but it’s enough to keep us going,” he says.  In the Photo: Walid’s wife preparing lunch. Her husband managed to buy her a gas stove, after months of using cardboard boxes to light up a fire for cooking  Photo: WFP/Marco Frattini
YEM_20170724_W....JPG
6144 x 4096 px 78.03 x 52.02 cm 5507.00 kb
 
Yemen, Sana'a, 24 July 2017  Walid Abdel Malek is young, polite and courteous. Despite some very tough years, he gracefully cruises through hardship keeping a brave face for the sake of his wife and three daughters. He cannot afford rent or a lot of food for his family, but his daughters look at him in awe. “They know our situation, they rarely ask for anything,” he says. “If one of them wanted something and I said I had no money, they accept and just walk away.” The law school graduate and his family were evicted from their rented houses twice after failing to pay the rent. Now, they live in a humble house in the Bani al-Harith district, north of Sana’a. The landlord has allowed them to stay there for free.  Originally from Taiz in central Yemen, Walid had been working in Sana’a before war broke out more than two years ago. Fearing for the life of his family, with conflict most intense in their area, he brought them all to Sana’a. Walid, a government employee, has not been paid for the past ten months. Millions of public employees have not received their full salaries since September 2016. His family, like the millions of Yemenis who are dependent on these salaries, no longer have a sustainable source of income. “I never wake them up. If I wake them up they would say they wanted to eat dinner.” The family now lives on a small income he makes working as a taxi driver on a rented car, which he struggles to pay the rent for every month. “We’ve been through some rough months, we had nothing in the house — no furniture, no food and no money,” he says. “Sometimes I would stay late for work and when I come home and find [the children] sleeping, I say to myself ‘let them sleep until the morning’. I never wake them up. If I wake them up they would say they wanted to eat dinner,” he says. “In the morning, the neighbours would usually bring us bread or something.”  The family depend almost entirely on the food assistance they receive from the World Food Programme. Since they are displaced, they receive a ration of wheat flour, pulses and oil, which keeps them stocked for a good part of the month. “Today is the end of the month, we do not have much food left now but at least we do know that some help will be on the way soon,” he says, as his wife prepares lunch. When there is no money and their food assistance has run out, they depend on the generosity of their neighbours.  As Walid’s family set up lunch, they are keen on inviting their guests to share the small, humble meal that is barely enough for their family of five. “We have very little, but it’s enough to keep us going,” he says.  Photo: WFP/Marco Frattini
YEM_20170724_W....JPG
6144 x 4096 px 78.03 x 52.02 cm 8047.00 kb
 
Syria, Lattakia, 24 July 2017

From the onset of the Syrian crisis in 2011, WFP has been on the frontlines doing whatever it takes to deliver food to millions of people who need it. WFP is also implementing activities that aim to promote and restore livelihoods and food security with a long-term resilience-building goal.   WFP implements activities to address the specific nutritional needs of vulnerable groups, including in children below the age of 5 as well as pregnant and nursing women. This includes programmes to prevent and treat acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies as well as a cash-based-transfer programme that allows pregnant women and nursing mothers to buy fresh food such as vegetables, dairy and meat, in order to increase their dietary diversity.  In the photo (from left to right): Nadia (11 months), Rashid and Muntaha.  Nadia's mother, Muntaha, is 8 months pregnant and her family receives food from WFP through the pregnant and nursing women voucher program. Muntaha is Syrian Turkmenistan and her Arabic is a bit difficult.   Rashid and Muntaha got married in Jdaida village in rural Jisr El-Shughour in Idleb, they fled their home due to the ongoing clashes. Rashid arrived in Lattakia almost two years ago, he used to be a singer earning well enough to live in good conditions. He also know how to fix Satellite receivers which is his own source of income for the time being.  Photo: WFP/Hussam Al Saleh
SYR_20170724_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 5026.00 kb
 
Syria, Lattakia, 24 July 2017

From the onset of the Syrian crisis in 2011, WFP has been on the frontlines doing whatever it takes to deliver food to millions of people who need it. WFP is also implementing activities that aim to promote and restore livelihoods and food security with a long-term resilience-building goal.   WFP implements activities to address the specific nutritional needs of vulnerable groups, including in children below the age of 5 as well as pregnant and nursing women. This includes programmes to prevent and treat acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies as well as a cash-based-transfer programme that allows pregnant women and nursing mothers to buy fresh food such as vegetables, dairy and meat, in order to increase their dietary diversity.  In the photo: Nadia 11 months.  Nadia's mother, Muntaha, is 8 months pregnant and her family receives food from WFP through the pregnant and nursing women voucher program. Muntaha is Syrian Turkmenistan and her Arabic is a bit difficult.   Rashid and Muntaha got married in Jdaida village in rural Jisr El-Shughour in Idleb, they fled their home due to the ongoing clashes. Rashid arrived in Lattakia almost two years ago, he used to be a singer earning well enough to live in good conditions. He also know how to fix Satellite receivers which is his own source of income for the time being.  Photo: WFP/Hussam Al Saleh
SYR_20170724_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 5748.00 kb
 
Syria, Lattakia, 24 July 2017

From the onset of the Syrian crisis in 2011, WFP has been on the frontlines doing whatever it takes to deliver food to millions of people who need it. WFP is also implementing activities that aim to promote and restore livelihoods and food security with a long-term resilience-building goal.   WFP implements activities to address the specific nutritional needs of vulnerable groups, including in children below the age of 5 as well as pregnant and nursing women. This includes programmes to prevent and treat acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies as well as a cash-based-transfer programme that allows pregnant women and nursing mothers to buy fresh food such as vegetables, dairy and meat, in order to increase their dietary diversity.  In the photo: Nadia 11 months.  Nadia's mother, Muntaha, is 8 months pregnant and her family receives food from WFP through the pregnant and nursing women voucher program. Muntaha is Syrian Turkmenistan and her Arabic is a bit difficult.   Rashid and Muntaha got married in Jdaida village in rural Jisr El-Shughour in Idleb, they fled their home due to the ongoing clashes. Rashid arrived in Lattakia almost two years ago, he used to be a singer earning well enough to live in good conditions. He also know how to fix Satellite receivers which is his own source of income for the time being.  Photo: WFP/Hussam Al Saleh
SYR_20170724_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 5670.00 kb
 
Syria, Lattakia, 24 July 2017

From the onset of the Syrian crisis in 2011, WFP has been on the frontlines doing whatever it takes to deliver food to millions of people who need it. WFP is also implementing activities that aim to promote and restore livelihoods and food security with a long-term resilience-building goal.   WFP implements activities to address the specific nutritional needs of vulnerable groups, including in children below the age of 5 as well as pregnant and nursing women. This includes programmes to prevent and treat acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies as well as a cash-based-transfer programme that allows pregnant women and nursing mothers to buy fresh food such as vegetables, dairy and meat, in order to increase their dietary diversity.  In the photo: Nadia 11 months.  Nadia's mother, Muntaha, is 8 months pregnant and her family receives food from WFP through the pregnant and nursing women voucher program. Muntaha is Syrian Turkmenistan and her Arabic is a bit difficult.   Rashid and Muntaha got married in Jdaida village in rural Jisr El-Shughour in Idleb, they fled their home due to the ongoing clashes. Rashid arrived in Lattakia almost two years ago, he used to be a singer earning well enough to live in good conditions. He also know how to fix Satellite receivers which is his own source of income for the time being.  Photo: WFP/Hussam Al Saleh
SYR_20170724_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 5549.00 kb
 
Syria, Lattakia, 24 July 2017

From the onset of the Syrian crisis in 2011, WFP has been on the frontlines doing whatever it takes to deliver food to millions of people who need it. WFP is also implementing activities that aim to promote and restore livelihoods and food security with a long-term resilience-building goal.   WFP implements activities to address the specific nutritional needs of vulnerable groups, including in children below the age of 5 as well as pregnant and nursing women. This includes programmes to prevent and treat acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies as well as a cash-based-transfer programme that allows pregnant women and nursing mothers to buy fresh food such as vegetables, dairy and meat, in order to increase their dietary diversity.  In the photo: Muntaha, is 8 months pregnant and her family receives food from WFP through the pregnant and nursing women voucher program. Muntaha is Syrian Turkmenistan and her Arabic is a bit difficult.   Rashid and Muntaha got married in Jdaida village in rural Jisr El-Shughour in Idleb, they fled their home due to the ongoing clashes. Rashid arrived in Lattakia almost two years ago, he used to be a singer earning well enough to live in good conditions. He also know how to fix Satellite receivers which is his own source of income for the time being.  Photo: WFP/Hussam Al Saleh
SYR_20170724_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 7250.00 kb
 
Syria, Lattakia, 24 July 2017

From the onset of the Syrian crisis in 2011, WFP has been on the frontlines doing whatever it takes to deliver food to millions of people who need it. WFP is also implementing activities that aim to promote and restore livelihoods and food security with a long-term resilience-building goal.   WFP implements activities to address the specific nutritional needs of vulnerable groups, including in children below the age of 5 as well as pregnant and nursing women. This includes programmes to prevent and treat acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies as well as a cash-based-transfer programme that allows pregnant women and nursing mothers to buy fresh food such as vegetables, dairy and meat, in order to increase their dietary diversity.  In the photo: Muntaha, is 8 months pregnant and her family receives food from WFP through the pregnant and nursing women voucher program. Muntaha is Syrian Turkmenistan and her Arabic is a bit difficult.   Rashid and Muntaha got married in Jdaida village in rural Jisr El-Shughour in Idleb, they fled their home due to the ongoing clashes. Rashid arrived in Lattakia almost two years ago, he used to be a singer earning well enough to live in good conditions. He also know how to fix Satellite receivers which is his own source of income for the time being.  Photo: WFP/Hussam Al Saleh
SYR_20170724_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 6794.00 kb
 
Syria, Lattakia, 24 July 2017

From the onset of the Syrian crisis in 2011, WFP has been on the frontlines doing whatever it takes to deliver food to millions of people who need it. WFP is also implementing activities that aim to promote and restore livelihoods and food security with a long-term resilience-building goal.   WFP implements activities to address the specific nutritional needs of vulnerable groups, including in children below the age of 5 as well as pregnant and nursing women. This includes programmes to prevent and treat acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies as well as a cash-based-transfer programme that allows pregnant women and nursing mothers to buy fresh food such as vegetables, dairy and meat, in order to increase their dietary diversity.  In the photo: Muntaha, is 8 months pregnant and her family receives food from WFP through the pregnant and nursing women voucher program. Muntaha is Syrian Turkmenistan and her Arabic is a bit difficult.   Rashid and Muntaha got married in Jdaida village in rural Jisr El-Shughour in Idleb, they fled their home due to the ongoing clashes. Rashid arrived in Lattakia almost two years ago, he used to be a singer earning well enough to live in good conditions. He also know how to fix Satellite receivers which is his own source of income for the time being.  Photo: WFP/Hussam Al Saleh
SYR_20170724_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 6284.00 kb
 
Syria, Lattakia, 24 July 2017

From the onset of the Syrian crisis in 2011, WFP has been on the frontlines doing whatever it takes to deliver food to millions of people who need it. WFP is also implementing activities that aim to promote and restore livelihoods and food security with a long-term resilience-building goal.   WFP implements activities to address the specific nutritional needs of vulnerable groups, including in children below the age of 5 as well as pregnant and nursing women. This includes programmes to prevent and treat acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies as well as a cash-based-transfer programme that allows pregnant women and nursing mothers to buy fresh food such as vegetables, dairy and meat, in order to increase their dietary diversity.  In the photo: Muntaha, is 8 months pregnant and her family receives food from WFP through the pregnant and nursing women voucher program. Muntaha is Syrian Turkmenistan and her Arabic is a bit difficult.   Rashid and Muntaha got married in Jdaida village in rural Jisr El-Shughour in Idleb, they fled their home due to the ongoing clashes. Rashid arrived in Lattakia almost two years ago, he used to be a singer earning well enough to live in good conditions. He also know how to fix Satellite receivers which is his own source of income for the time being.  Photo: WFP/Hussam Al Saleh
SYR_20170724_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 6473.00 kb
 
Syria, Lattakia, 24 July 2017

From the onset of the Syrian crisis in 2011, WFP has been on the frontlines doing whatever it takes to deliver food to millions of people who need it. WFP is also implementing activities that aim to promote and restore livelihoods and food security with a long-term resilience-building goal.   WFP implements activities to address the specific nutritional needs of vulnerable groups, including in children below the age of 5 as well as pregnant and nursing women. This includes programmes to prevent and treat acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies as well as a cash-based-transfer programme that allows pregnant women and nursing mothers to buy fresh food such as vegetables, dairy and meat, in order to increase their dietary diversity.  In the photo: Muntaha, is 8 months pregnant and her family receives food from WFP through the pregnant and nursing women voucher program. Muntaha is Syrian Turkmenistan and her Arabic is a bit difficult.   Rashid and Muntaha got married in Jdaida village in rural Jisr El-Shughour in Idleb, they fled their home due to the ongoing clashes. Rashid arrived in Lattakia almost two years ago, he used to be a singer earning well enough to live in good conditions. He also know how to fix Satellite receivers which is his own source of income for the time being.  Photo: WFP/Hussam Al Saleh
SYR_20170724_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 6460.00 kb
 
Syria, Lattakia, 24 July 2017

From the onset of the Syrian crisis in 2011, WFP has been on the frontlines doing whatever it takes to deliver food to millions of people who need it. WFP is also implementing activities that aim to promote and restore livelihoods and food security with a long-term resilience-building goal.   WFP implements activities to address the specific nutritional needs of vulnerable groups, including in children below the age of 5 as well as pregnant and nursing women. This includes programmes to prevent and treat acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies as well as a cash-based-transfer programme that allows pregnant women and nursing mothers to buy fresh food such as vegetables, dairy and meat, in order to increase their dietary diversity.  In the photo: Nadia 11 months.  Nadia's mother, Muntaha, is 8 months pregnant and her family receives food from WFP through the pregnant and nursing women voucher program. Muntaha is Syrian Turkmenistan and her Arabic is a bit difficult.   Rashid and Muntaha got married in Jdaida village in rural Jisr El-Shughour in Idleb, they fled their home due to the ongoing clashes. Rashid arrived in Lattakia almost two years ago, he used to be a singer earning well enough to live in good conditions. He also know how to fix Satellite receivers which is his own source of income for the time being.  Photo: WFP/Hussam Al Saleh
SYR_20170724_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 5825.00 kb
 
Syria, Lattakia, 24 July 2017

From the onset of the Syrian crisis in 2011, WFP has been on the frontlines doing whatever it takes to deliver food to millions of people who need it. WFP is also implementing activities that aim to promote and restore livelihoods and food security with a long-term resilience-building goal.   WFP implements activities to address the specific nutritional needs of vulnerable groups, including in children below the age of 5 as well as pregnant and nursing women. This includes programmes to prevent and treat acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies as well as a cash-based-transfer programme that allows pregnant women and nursing mothers to buy fresh food such as vegetables, dairy and meat, in order to increase their dietary diversity.  In the photo: Nadia 11 months.  Nadia's mother, Muntaha, is 8 months pregnant and her family receives food from WFP through the pregnant and nursing women voucher program. Muntaha is Syrian Turkmenistan and her Arabic is a bit difficult.   Rashid and Muntaha got married in Jdaida village in rural Jisr El-Shughour in Idleb, they fled their home due to the ongoing clashes. Rashid arrived in Lattakia almost two years ago, he used to be a singer earning well enough to live in good conditions. He also know how to fix Satellite receivers which is his own source of income for the time being.  Photo: WFP/Hussam Al Saleh
SYR_20170724_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 6062.00 kb
 
Yemen, Al-Rayyan village, Zabid, 18 July 2017  In the Photo: Yemeni women and children at a WFP distribution site in Zabid in Al-Rayyan village near the historic of Zabid, around 100 km south of Hodeidah City. Most villagers there have lost their only source of income working in agriculture.  Photo: WFP/Fares Khoailed
YEM_20170718_W....JPG
5759 x 3240 px 203.16 x 114.30 cm 3212.00 kb
 
Yemen, Al-Rayyan village, Zabid, 18 July 2017  In the Photo: Yemeni women at a WFP distribution site in Zabid in Al-Rayyan village near the historic of Zabid, around 100 km south of Hodeidah City. Most villagers there have lost their only source of income working in agriculture.  Photo: WFP/Fares Khoailed
YEM_20170718_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 5377.00 kb
 
Yemen, Al-Rayyan village, Zabid, 18 July 2017  In the Photo: a Yemeni woman at a WFP distribution site in Zabid in Al-Rayyan village near the historic of Zabid, around 100 km south of Hodeidah City. Most villagers there have lost their only source of income working in agriculture.  Photo: WFP/Fares Khoailed
YEM_20170718_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 1730.00 kb
 
Yemen, Al-Rayyan village, Zabid, 18 July 2017  In the Photo: a Yemeni woman at a WFP distribution site in Zabid in Al-Rayyan village near the historic of Zabid, around 100 km south of Hodeidah City. Most villagers there have lost their only source of income working in agriculture.  Photo: WFP/Fares Khoailed
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3840 x 5760 px 135.47 x 203.20 cm 2047.00 kb
 
Yemen, Al-Rayyan village, Zabid, 18 July 2017  In the Photo: a Yemeni woman at a WFP distribution site in Zabid in Al-Rayyan village near the historic of Zabid, around 100 km south of Hodeidah City. Most villagers there have lost their only source of income working in agriculture.  Photo: WFP/Fares Khoailed
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Yemen, Al-Rayyan village, Zabid, 18 July 2017  In the Photo: a Yemeni woman at a WFP distribution site in Zabid in Al-Rayyan village near the historic of Zabid, around 100 km south of Hodeidah City. Most villagers there have lost their only source of income working in agriculture.  Photo: WFP/Fares Khoailed
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Yemen, Al-Rayyan village, Zabid, 18 July 2017  In the Photo: WFP staffer Ahmad Al-Saidi at a food distribution point in Al-Rayyan village near the historic of Zabid, around 100 km south of Hodeidah City. Most villagers there have lost their only source of income working in agriculture as many farms closed down for lack of fuel and water.  Photo: WFP/Fares Khoailed
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Yemen, Al-Rayyan village, Zabid, 18 July 2017  In the Photo: a Yemeni child at a WFP distribution site in Zabid in Al-Rayyan village near the historic of Zabid, around 100 km south of Hodeidah City. Most villagers there have lost their only source of income working in agriculture.  Photo: WFP/Fares Khoailed
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