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Yemen, Hodeidah Port, 15 January 2018  A ship carrying four mobile cranes purchased by the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) has arrived in Yemen’s Hodeidah Port to allow faster delivery of relief items for Yemeni families in the grips of the world’s biggest hunger crisis.  The cranes, which will be operational immediately, are urgently needed to boost the capacity of Hodeidah Port, which handles around 70 percent of Yemen’s imports, including critically-needed food and humanitarian supplies. With each of the mobile cranes able to handle up to 60 tons, they will significantly boost the discharge of humanitarian cargo other relief items.  Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates facilitated the transfer of the cranes aboard the WFP-chartered vessel MV JUIST to Yemen.  More than 22 million people in Yemen need humanitarian assistance, including 11.3 million who are in acute need – an increase of more than one million people since March 2017. This also includes 8.4 million hungry people who depend entirely on external food assistance. Most of them live in areas in central and northern Yemen that are most rapidly and cost-effectively reached via Hodeidah Port.  “We are grateful to the US Government for funding these cranes, the US and UK governments for continuing to draw attention to how important they are and to all our partners whose collaboration and support ultimately helped us get them into Yemen,” said WFP Executive Director David Beasley. “The real winners are the people of Yemen, because Hodeidah Port is a humanitarian lifeline for millions who are on the brink of famine. We are committed to doing whatever it takes to ensure a consistent flow of life-saving food and supplies to the country.”  The cranes will increase the port’s capacity, but more work is needed, Beasley noted. “To avert even greater catastrophe, WFP needs better access and smooth, timely clearance of shipments,” he said.   WFP has been providing monthly food assistance to nearly seven million people in Yemen since August 2017 – double the number it was able to assist in the first half of 2017.   In January, WFP hopes to reach 7 million people, though as in previous months and due to financial constraints only about half of these people are receiving full food rations, the remainder will receive a smaller ration that covers 60 percent of their needs. WFP requires US$303 million to sustain life-saving support through June 2018.  Photo: WFP/Fares Khoailed
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1080 x 810 px 28.58 x 21.43 cm 127.00 kb
 
Yemen, Hodeidah Port, 15 January 2018  A ship carrying four mobile cranes purchased by the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) has arrived in Yemen’s Hodeidah Port to allow faster delivery of relief items for Yemeni families in the grips of the world’s biggest hunger crisis.  The cranes, which will be operational immediately, are urgently needed to boost the capacity of Hodeidah Port, which handles around 70 percent of Yemen’s imports, including critically-needed food and humanitarian supplies. With each of the mobile cranes able to handle up to 60 tons, they will significantly boost the discharge of humanitarian cargo other relief items.  Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates facilitated the transfer of the cranes aboard the WFP-chartered vessel MV JUIST to Yemen.  More than 22 million people in Yemen need humanitarian assistance, including 11.3 million who are in acute need – an increase of more than one million people since March 2017. This also includes 8.4 million hungry people who depend entirely on external food assistance. Most of them live in areas in central and northern Yemen that are most rapidly and cost-effectively reached via Hodeidah Port.  “We are grateful to the US Government for funding these cranes, the US and UK governments for continuing to draw attention to how important they are and to all our partners whose collaboration and support ultimately helped us get them into Yemen,” said WFP Executive Director David Beasley. “The real winners are the people of Yemen, because Hodeidah Port is a humanitarian lifeline for millions who are on the brink of famine. We are committed to doing whatever it takes to ensure a consistent flow of life-saving food and supplies to the country.”  The cranes will increase the port’s capacity, but more work is needed, Beasley noted. “To avert even greater catastrophe, WFP needs better access and smooth, timely clearance of shipments,” he said.   WFP has been providing monthly food assistance to nearly seven million people in Yemen since August 2017 – double the number it was able to assist in the first half of 2017.   In January, WFP hopes to reach 7 million people, though as in previous months and due to financial constraints only about half of these people are receiving full food rations, the remainder will receive a smaller ration that covers 60 percent of their needs. WFP requires US$303 million to sustain life-saving support through June 2018.  Photo: WFP/Fares Khoailed
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1024 x 576 px 27.09 x 15.24 cm 86.00 kb
 
Yemen, Hodeidah Port, 15 January 2018  A ship carrying four mobile cranes purchased by the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) has arrived in Yemen’s Hodeidah Port to allow faster delivery of relief items for Yemeni families in the grips of the world’s biggest hunger crisis.  The cranes, which will be operational immediately, are urgently needed to boost the capacity of Hodeidah Port, which handles around 70 percent of Yemen’s imports, including critically-needed food and humanitarian supplies. With each of the mobile cranes able to handle up to 60 tons, they will significantly boost the discharge of humanitarian cargo other relief items.  Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates facilitated the transfer of the cranes aboard the WFP-chartered vessel MV JUIST to Yemen.  More than 22 million people in Yemen need humanitarian assistance, including 11.3 million who are in acute need – an increase of more than one million people since March 2017. This also includes 8.4 million hungry people who depend entirely on external food assistance. Most of them live in areas in central and northern Yemen that are most rapidly and cost-effectively reached via Hodeidah Port.  “We are grateful to the US Government for funding these cranes, the US and UK governments for continuing to draw attention to how important they are and to all our partners whose collaboration and support ultimately helped us get them into Yemen,” said WFP Executive Director David Beasley. “The real winners are the people of Yemen, because Hodeidah Port is a humanitarian lifeline for millions who are on the brink of famine. We are committed to doing whatever it takes to ensure a consistent flow of life-saving food and supplies to the country.”  The cranes will increase the port’s capacity, but more work is needed, Beasley noted. “To avert even greater catastrophe, WFP needs better access and smooth, timely clearance of shipments,” he said.   WFP has been providing monthly food assistance to nearly seven million people in Yemen since August 2017 – double the number it was able to assist in the first half of 2017.   In January, WFP hopes to reach 7 million people, though as in previous months and due to financial constraints only about half of these people are receiving full food rations, the remainder will receive a smaller ration that covers 60 percent of their needs. WFP requires US$303 million to sustain life-saving support through June 2018.  Photo: WFP/Fares Khoailed
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1024 x 578 px 27.09 x 15.29 cm 91.00 kb
 
Yemen, Hodeidah Port, 15 January 2018  A ship carrying four mobile cranes purchased by the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) has arrived in Yemen’s Hodeidah Port to allow faster delivery of relief items for Yemeni families in the grips of the world’s biggest hunger crisis.  The cranes, which will be operational immediately, are urgently needed to boost the capacity of Hodeidah Port, which handles around 70 percent of Yemen’s imports, including critically-needed food and humanitarian supplies. With each of the mobile cranes able to handle up to 60 tons, they will significantly boost the discharge of humanitarian cargo other relief items.  Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates facilitated the transfer of the cranes aboard the WFP-chartered vessel MV JUIST to Yemen.  More than 22 million people in Yemen need humanitarian assistance, including 11.3 million who are in acute need – an increase of more than one million people since March 2017. This also includes 8.4 million hungry people who depend entirely on external food assistance. Most of them live in areas in central and northern Yemen that are most rapidly and cost-effectively reached via Hodeidah Port.  “We are grateful to the US Government for funding these cranes, the US and UK governments for continuing to draw attention to how important they are and to all our partners whose collaboration and support ultimately helped us get them into Yemen,” said WFP Executive Director David Beasley. “The real winners are the people of Yemen, because Hodeidah Port is a humanitarian lifeline for millions who are on the brink of famine. We are committed to doing whatever it takes to ensure a consistent flow of life-saving food and supplies to the country.”  The cranes will increase the port’s capacity, but more work is needed, Beasley noted. “To avert even greater catastrophe, WFP needs better access and smooth, timely clearance of shipments,” he said.   WFP has been providing monthly food assistance to nearly seven million people in Yemen since August 2017 – double the number it was able to assist in the first half of 2017.   In January, WFP hopes to reach 7 million people, though as in previous months and due to financial constraints only about half of these people are receiving full food rations, the remainder will receive a smaller ration that covers 60 percent of their needs. WFP requires US$303 million to sustain life-saving support through June 2018.  Photo: WFP/Fares Khoailed
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1024 x 578 px 27.09 x 15.29 cm 85.00 kb
 
Yemen, Hodeidah Port, 15 January 2018  A ship carrying four mobile cranes purchased by the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) has arrived in Yemen’s Hodeidah Port to allow faster delivery of relief items for Yemeni families in the grips of the world’s biggest hunger crisis.  The cranes, which will be operational immediately, are urgently needed to boost the capacity of Hodeidah Port, which handles around 70 percent of Yemen’s imports, including critically-needed food and humanitarian supplies. With each of the mobile cranes able to handle up to 60 tons, they will significantly boost the discharge of humanitarian cargo other relief items.  Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates facilitated the transfer of the cranes aboard the WFP-chartered vessel MV JUIST to Yemen.  More than 22 million people in Yemen need humanitarian assistance, including 11.3 million who are in acute need – an increase of more than one million people since March 2017. This also includes 8.4 million hungry people who depend entirely on external food assistance. Most of them live in areas in central and northern Yemen that are most rapidly and cost-effectively reached via Hodeidah Port.  “We are grateful to the US Government for funding these cranes, the US and UK governments for continuing to draw attention to how important they are and to all our partners whose collaboration and support ultimately helped us get them into Yemen,” said WFP Executive Director David Beasley. “The real winners are the people of Yemen, because Hodeidah Port is a humanitarian lifeline for millions who are on the brink of famine. We are committed to doing whatever it takes to ensure a consistent flow of life-saving food and supplies to the country.”  The cranes will increase the port’s capacity, but more work is needed, Beasley noted. “To avert even greater catastrophe, WFP needs better access and smooth, timely clearance of shipments,” he said.   WFP has been providing monthly food assistance to nearly seven million people in Yemen since August 2017 – double the number it was able to assist in the first half of 2017.   In January, WFP hopes to reach 7 million people, though as in previous months and due to financial constraints only about half of these people are receiving full food rations, the remainder will receive a smaller ration that covers 60 percent of their needs. WFP requires US$303 million to sustain life-saving support through June 2018.  Photo: WFP/Fares Khoailed
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1024 x 586 px 27.09 x 15.50 cm 93.00 kb
 
Yemen, Hodeidah Port, 15 January 2018  A ship carrying four mobile cranes purchased by the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) has arrived in Yemen’s Hodeidah Port to allow faster delivery of relief items for Yemeni families in the grips of the world’s biggest hunger crisis.  The cranes, which will be operational immediately, are urgently needed to boost the capacity of Hodeidah Port, which handles around 70 percent of Yemen’s imports, including critically-needed food and humanitarian supplies. With each of the mobile cranes able to handle up to 60 tons, they will significantly boost the discharge of humanitarian cargo other relief items.  Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates facilitated the transfer of the cranes aboard the WFP-chartered vessel MV JUIST to Yemen.  More than 22 million people in Yemen need humanitarian assistance, including 11.3 million who are in acute need – an increase of more than one million people since March 2017. This also includes 8.4 million hungry people who depend entirely on external food assistance. Most of them live in areas in central and northern Yemen that are most rapidly and cost-effectively reached via Hodeidah Port.  “We are grateful to the US Government for funding these cranes, the US and UK governments for continuing to draw attention to how important they are and to all our partners whose collaboration and support ultimately helped us get them into Yemen,” said WFP Executive Director David Beasley. “The real winners are the people of Yemen, because Hodeidah Port is a humanitarian lifeline for millions who are on the brink of famine. We are committed to doing whatever it takes to ensure a consistent flow of life-saving food and supplies to the country.”  The cranes will increase the port’s capacity, but more work is needed, Beasley noted. “To avert even greater catastrophe, WFP needs better access and smooth, timely clearance of shipments,” he said.   WFP has been providing monthly food assistance to nearly seven million people in Yemen since August 2017 – double the number it was able to assist in the first half of 2017.   In January, WFP hopes to reach 7 million people, though as in previous months and due to financial constraints only about half of these people are receiving full food rations, the remainder will receive a smaller ration that covers 60 percent of their needs. WFP requires US$303 million to sustain life-saving support through June 2018.  Photo: WFP/Fares Khoailed
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1024 x 572 px 27.09 x 15.13 cm 101.00 kb
 
Yemen, Hodeidah Port, 15 January 2018  A ship carrying four mobile cranes purchased by the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) has arrived in Yemen’s Hodeidah Port to allow faster delivery of relief items for Yemeni families in the grips of the world’s biggest hunger crisis.  The cranes, which will be operational immediately, are urgently needed to boost the capacity of Hodeidah Port, which handles around 70 percent of Yemen’s imports, including critically-needed food and humanitarian supplies. With each of the mobile cranes able to handle up to 60 tons, they will significantly boost the discharge of humanitarian cargo other relief items.  Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates facilitated the transfer of the cranes aboard the WFP-chartered vessel MV JUIST to Yemen.  More than 22 million people in Yemen need humanitarian assistance, including 11.3 million who are in acute need – an increase of more than one million people since March 2017. This also includes 8.4 million hungry people who depend entirely on external food assistance. Most of them live in areas in central and northern Yemen that are most rapidly and cost-effectively reached via Hodeidah Port.  “We are grateful to the US Government for funding these cranes, the US and UK governments for continuing to draw attention to how important they are and to all our partners whose collaboration and support ultimately helped us get them into Yemen,” said WFP Executive Director David Beasley. “The real winners are the people of Yemen, because Hodeidah Port is a humanitarian lifeline for millions who are on the brink of famine. We are committed to doing whatever it takes to ensure a consistent flow of life-saving food and supplies to the country.”  The cranes will increase the port’s capacity, but more work is needed, Beasley noted. “To avert even greater catastrophe, WFP needs better access and smooth, timely clearance of shipments,” he said.   WFP has been providing monthly food assistance to nearly seven million people in Yemen since August 2017 – double the number it was able to assist in the first half of 2017.   In January, WFP hopes to reach 7 million people, though as in previous months and due to financial constraints only about half of these people are receiving full food rations, the remainder will receive a smaller ration that covers 60 percent of their needs. WFP requires US$303 million to sustain life-saving support through June 2018.  Photo: WFP/Judith Lumu
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1080 x 607 px 9.14 x 5.14 cm 72.00 kb
 
Yemen, Hodeidah Port, 14 January 2018  A ship carrying four mobile cranes purchased by the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) has arrived in Yemen’s Hodeidah Port to allow faster delivery of relief items for Yemeni families in the grips of the world’s biggest hunger crisis.  The cranes, which will be operational immediately, are urgently needed to boost the capacity of Hodeidah Port, which handles around 70 percent of Yemen’s imports, including critically-needed food and humanitarian supplies. With each of the mobile cranes able to handle up to 60 tons, they will significantly boost the discharge of humanitarian cargo other relief items.  Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates facilitated the transfer of the cranes aboard the WFP-chartered vessel MV JUIST to Yemen.  More than 22 million people in Yemen need humanitarian assistance, including 11.3 million who are in acute need – an increase of more than one million people since March 2017. This also includes 8.4 million hungry people who depend entirely on external food assistance. Most of them live in areas in central and northern Yemen that are most rapidly and cost-effectively reached via Hodeidah Port.  “We are grateful to the US Government for funding these cranes, the US and UK governments for continuing to draw attention to how important they are and to all our partners whose collaboration and support ultimately helped us get them into Yemen,” said WFP Executive Director David Beasley. “The real winners are the people of Yemen, because Hodeidah Port is a humanitarian lifeline for millions who are on the brink of famine. We are committed to doing whatever it takes to ensure a consistent flow of life-saving food and supplies to the country.”  The cranes will increase the port’s capacity, but more work is needed, Beasley noted. “To avert even greater catastrophe, WFP needs better access and smooth, timely clearance of shipments,” he said.   WFP has been providing monthly food assistance to nearly seven million people in Yemen since August 2017 – double the number it was able to assist in the first half of 2017.   In January, WFP hopes to reach 7 million people, though as in previous months and due to financial constraints only about half of these people are receiving full food rations, the remainder will receive a smaller ration that covers 60 percent of their needs. WFP requires US$303 million to sustain life-saving support through June 2018.  Photo: WFP/Sasha Hafez
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4032 x 3024 px 142.24 x 106.68 cm 1820.00 kb
 
Syria, Maghar Al Mir village, Qatana District (Rural Damascus Governorate), 29 December 2017  Maghar al-Mir is a Syrian village in the Qatana District of the Rural Damascus Governorate. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics, Maghar al-Mir had a population of 588 in the 2004 census. In 2013 it was attacked by Nosra Front coming from nearby towns of Beit Jan and Mazra’at beit Jan. Its population fled the village to neighboring villages in Hermon Mountain, since then the villages of Beit Jan, Mazra’at Beit Jan and Mughar Al Mir weren’t accessible until 28 Dec 2017 when Nosra Front was defeated after 120 days of intensive fight with Syrian Army, and surrendered to Syrian army.   In the Photo: Destruction in Maghar al-Mir, a Syrian village in the Qatana District of the Rural Damascus Governorate.  Photo: WFP/Hussam Al Saleh
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 8825.00 kb
 
Syria, Maghar Al Mir village, Qatana District (Rural Damascus Governorate), 29 December 2017  Maghar al-Mir is a Syrian village in the Qatana District of the Rural Damascus Governorate. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics, Maghar al-Mir had a population of 588 in the 2004 census. In 2013 it was attacked by Nosra Front coming from nearby towns of Beit Jan and Mazra’at beit Jan. Its population fled the village to neighboring villages in Hermon Mountain, since then the villages of Beit Jan, Mazra’at Beit Jan and Mughar Al Mir weren’t accessible until 28 Dec 2017 when Nosra Front was defeated after 120 days of intensive fight with Syrian Army, and surrendered to Syrian army.   In the Photo: Destruction in Maghar al-Mir, a Syrian village in the Qatana District of the Rural Damascus Governorate.  Photo: WFP/Hussam Al Saleh
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 8775.00 kb
 
Syria, Maghar Al Mir village, Qatana District (Rural Damascus Governorate), 29 December 2017  Maghar al-Mir is a Syrian village in the Qatana District of the Rural Damascus Governorate. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics, Maghar al-Mir had a population of 588 in the 2004 census. In 2013 it was attacked by Nosra Front coming from nearby towns of Beit Jan and Mazra’at beit Jan. Its population fled the village to neighboring villages in Hermon Mountain, since then the villages of Beit Jan, Mazra’at Beit Jan and Mughar Al Mir weren’t accessible until 28 Dec 2017 when Nosra Front was defeated after 120 days of intensive fight with Syrian Army, and surrendered to Syrian army.   In the Photo: Destruction in Maghar al-Mir, a Syrian village in the Qatana District of the Rural Damascus Governorate.  Photo: WFP/Hussam Al Saleh
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 7435.00 kb
 
Syria, Maghar Al Mir village, Qatana District (Rural Damascus Governorate), 29 December 2017  Maghar al-Mir is a Syrian village in the Qatana District of the Rural Damascus Governorate. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics, Maghar al-Mir had a population of 588 in the 2004 census. In 2013 it was attacked by Nosra Front coming from nearby towns of Beit Jan and Mazra’at beit Jan. Its population fled the village to neighboring villages in Hermon Mountain, since then the villages of Beit Jan, Mazra’at Beit Jan and Mughar Al Mir weren’t accessible until 28 Dec 2017 when Nosra Front was defeated after 120 days of intensive fight with Syrian Army, and surrendered to Syrian army.   In the Photo: Destruction in Maghar al-Mir, a Syrian village in the Qatana District of the Rural Damascus Governorate.  Photo: WFP/Hussam Al Saleh
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 7660.00 kb
 
Syria, Maghar Al Mir village, Qatana District (Rural Damascus Governorate), 29 December 2017  Maghar al-Mir is a Syrian village in the Qatana District of the Rural Damascus Governorate. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics, Maghar al-Mir had a population of 588 in the 2004 census. In 2013 it was attacked by Nosra Front coming from nearby towns of Beit Jan and Mazra’at beit Jan. Its population fled the village to neighboring villages in Hermon Mountain, since then the villages of Beit Jan, Mazra’at Beit Jan and Mughar Al Mir weren’t accessible until 28 Dec 2017 when Nosra Front was defeated after 120 days of intensive fight with Syrian Army, and surrendered to Syrian army.   In the Photo: Destruction in Maghar al-Mir, a Syrian village in the Qatana District of the Rural Damascus Governorate.  Photo: WFP/Hussam Al Saleh
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 8784.00 kb
 
Syria, Maghar Al Mir village, Qatana District (Rural Damascus Governorate), 29 December 2017  Maghar al-Mir is a Syrian village in the Qatana District of the Rural Damascus Governorate. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics, Maghar al-Mir had a population of 588 in the 2004 census. In 2013 it was attacked by Nosra Front coming from nearby towns of Beit Jan and Mazra’at beit Jan. Its population fled the village to neighboring villages in Hermon Mountain, since then the villages of Beit Jan, Mazra’at Beit Jan and Mughar Al Mir weren’t accessible until 28 Dec 2017 when Nosra Front was defeated after 120 days of intensive fight with Syrian Army, and surrendered to Syrian army.   In the Photo: Destruction in Maghar al-Mir, a Syrian village in the Qatana District of the Rural Damascus Governorate.  Photo: WFP/Hussam Al Saleh
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 7825.00 kb
 
Syria, Maghar Al Mir village, Qatana District (Rural Damascus Governorate), 29 December 2017  Maghar al-Mir is a Syrian village in the Qatana District of the Rural Damascus Governorate. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics, Maghar al-Mir had a population of 588 in the 2004 census. In 2013 it was attacked by Nosra Front coming from nearby towns of Beit Jan and Mazra’at beit Jan. Its population fled the village to neighboring villages in Hermon Mountain, since then the villages of Beit Jan, Mazra’at Beit Jan and Mughar Al Mir weren’t accessible until 28 Dec 2017 when Nosra Front was defeated after 120 days of intensive fight with Syrian Army, and surrendered to Syrian army.   In the Photo: Destruction in Maghar al-Mir, a Syrian village in the Qatana District of the Rural Damascus Governorate.  Photo: WFP/Hussam Al Saleh
SYR_20171229_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 8611.00 kb
 
Syria, Maghar Al Mir village, Qatana District (Rural Damascus Governorate), 29 December 2017  Maghar al-Mir is a Syrian village in the Qatana District of the Rural Damascus Governorate. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics, Maghar al-Mir had a population of 588 in the 2004 census. In 2013 it was attacked by Nosra Front coming from nearby towns of Beit Jan and Mazra’at beit Jan. Its population fled the village to neighboring villages in Hermon Mountain, since then the villages of Beit Jan, Mazra’at Beit Jan and Mughar Al Mir weren’t accessible until 28 Dec 2017 when Nosra Front was defeated after 120 days of intensive fight with Syrian Army, and surrendered to Syrian army.   In the Photo: Destruction in Maghar al-Mir, a Syrian village in the Qatana District of the Rural Damascus Governorate.  Photo: WFP/Hussam Al Saleh
SYR_20171229_W....JPG
5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 7526.00 kb
 
Philippines, Barangay Kormatan, Madalum, Lanao del Sur, 28 December 2017  Typhoon Tembin, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Vinta, was a deadly tropical cyclone that impacted the southern Philippines in December 2017.  In the Photo: national main road/highway located in Municipality of Madalum is flooded with mud and big rocks when STS Tembin on December 22, 2017.   Photo: WFP/Anuar Mustapha
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4160 x 3120 px 146.76 x 110.07 cm 5334.00 kb
 
Philippines, Barangay Kormatan, Madalum, Lanao del Sur, 28 December 2017  Typhoon Tembin, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Vinta, was a deadly tropical cyclone that impacted the southern Philippines in December 2017.  In the Photo: national main road/highway located in Municipality of Madalum is flooded with mud and big rocks when STS Tembin on December 22, 2017.   Photo: WFP/Anuar Mustapha
PHI_20171228_W....jpg
4160 x 3120 px 146.76 x 110.07 cm 4711.00 kb
 
Afghanistan, Kabul, 20 December 2017  Abdul Satar, 40, is living with his family in an Informal Kabul Settlement.  After spending 27 years as a refugee in Pakistan, 18 months ago his family returned to their village in northern Baghlan province but could not spend more than a month there due to conflict in the area. They were forced to come to Kabul and start new life in a Kabul informal settlement as displaced people. Abdul Satar receive direct cash from WFP as its seasonal support to IDPs in Kabul.  Photo: WFP/Wahidullah Amani
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6016 x 4000 px 50.94 x 33.87 cm 6546.00 kb
 
Afghanistan, Kabul, 20 December 2017  Crowd of internally displaced people outside a WFP direct cash distribution in a Kabul informal settlement.  Photo: WFP/Wahidullah Amani
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6016 x 4000 px 50.94 x 33.87 cm 6596.00 kb
 
Afghanistan, Kabul, 20 December 2017  Shereen Gul, 62, is originally from Loger province, for 12 years she has been living with her family in a camp in Kabul after her daughter who was a teacher was shot dead by unknown armed men in their village. Shereen Gul received her second round of direct cash from WFP in Kabul.  Photo: WFP/Wahidullah Amani
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6016 x 4000 px 50.94 x 33.87 cm 6225.00 kb
 
Afghanistan, Kabul, 20 December 2017  Abdul Satar, 40, is living with his family in an Informal Kabul Settlement.  After spending 27 years as a refugee in Pakistan, 18 months ago his family returned to their village in northern Baghlan province but could not spend more than a month there due to conflict in the area. They were forced to come to Kabul and start new life in a Kabul informal settlement as displaced people. Abdul Satar receive direct cash from WFP as its seasonal support to IDPs in Kabul.  Photo: WFP/Wahidullah Amani
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6016 x 4000 px 50.94 x 33.87 cm 6323.00 kb
 
Iraq, Kurdistan, Khazer Camp, 18 December 2017  Iraqis displaced in the Khazer Camp are in desperate need of food and safe shelter. Government and humanitarian resources are stretched in order to respond to the needs of all the displaced.   WFP is monitoring the frontlines and pre-positioning food and distribution sites in order to meet the needs of IDPs on the move between conflict zones.  In the photo: in Khazer camp, 40 kilometres to the east of Mosul, a small cute IDP girl is eating bread right out of the clay oven.  Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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4936 x 3290 px 174.13 x 116.06 cm 12827.00 kb
 
Iraq, Kurdistan, Khazer Camp, 18 December 2017  Iraqis displaced in the Khazer Camp are in desperate need of food and safe shelter. Government and humanitarian resources are stretched in order to respond to the needs of all the displaced.   WFP is monitoring the frontlines and pre-positioning food and distribution sites in order to meet the needs of IDPs on the move between conflict zones.  In the photo: in Khazer camp, 40 kilometres to the east of Mosul, a small cute IDP girl is eating bread right out of the clay oven.  Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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5760 x 3840 px 203.20 x 135.47 cm 13586.00 kb
 
Iraq, Kurdistan, Khazer Camp, 18 December 2017  Iraqis displaced in the Khazer Camp are in desperate need of food and safe shelter. Government and humanitarian resources are stretched in order to respond to the needs of all the displaced.   WFP is monitoring the frontlines and pre-positioning food and distribution sites in order to meet the needs of IDPs on the move between conflict zones.  In the photo: in Khazer camp, 40 kilometres to the east of Mosul, a small cute IDP girl is eating bread right out of the clay oven.  Photo: WFP/Inger Marie Vennize
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4725 x 3150 px 166.69 x 111.13 cm 9324.00 kb

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