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Madagascar, Beabo Public school (Ambovombe), Androy region, 12 December 2018  WFP provides school meals with the support of the Ministry of National Education and is helping to develop a national school meals policy and a Home Grown School Meals programme (HGSF) linked to smallholder farmer production. As part of this programme, during the 2017/2018 school year, around 290,000 school children benefitted from daily hot meals, fortified with micronutrient powders in 1,100 primary public schools of southern Madagascar. In the south, school meals constitute a social security net for the most vulnerable households.   With the aim of linking small-holder farmer associations to school canteens, diversifying school meals, and providing income generating opportunities to small-holder farmers organizations, WFP launched a initiative, in collaboration with the Ministry of National Education, IFAD’s AROPA project and the FAO, in 20 targeted schools of Ambovombe district (Androy region, Southern Madagascar).  As part of this project, the 20 targeted schools benefit from life-skills education and trainings. Small-holder associations composed of children’s parents, cultivate vegetables on the school land using a micro irrigation system, plant fruit trees and possess small-scale livestock farms (chicken and goat). These activities enable them to supply school canteens with fresh and locally produced foods (partly sold and partly donated to schools), and sell part of their products in local markets for income generating purposes.  In the Photo: a view of the irrigation system put in place in the Beabo Public school as part of the Home Grown School Meals programme (HGSF).  "FAO contributed to this school garden by providing drop-to-drop irrigation kits. We also provided technical training on vegetable crops. And finally, we supported the technical support of parents on cultures maintenance" says Lova Andriantoa Rasoamaharo, FAO Field monitor.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
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Madagascar, Beabo Public school (Ambovombe), Androy region, 12 December 2018  WFP provides school meals with the support of the Ministry of National Education and is helping to develop a national school meals policy and a Home Grown School Meals programme (HGSF) linked to smallholder farmer production. As part of this programme, during the 2017/2018 school year, around 290,000 school children benefitted from daily hot meals, fortified with micronutrient powders in 1,100 primary public schools of southern Madagascar. In the south, school meals constitute a social security net for the most vulnerable households.   With the aim of linking small-holder farmer associations to school canteens, diversifying school meals, and providing income generating opportunities to small-holder farmers organizations, WFP launched a initiative, in collaboration with the Ministry of National Education, IFAD’s AROPA project and the FAO, in 20 targeted schools of Ambovombe district (Androy region, Southern Madagascar).  As part of this project, the 20 targeted schools benefit from life-skills education and trainings. Small-holder associations composed of children’s parents, cultivate vegetables on the school land using a micro irrigation system, plant fruit trees and possess small-scale livestock farms (chicken and goat). These activities enable them to supply school canteens with fresh and locally produced foods (partly sold and partly donated to schools), and sell part of their products in local markets for income generating purposes.  In the Photo: a view of the irrigation system put in place in the Beabo Public school as part of the Home Grown School Meals programme (HGSF).  "FAO contributed to this school garden by providing drop-to-drop irrigation kits. We also provided technical training on vegetable crops. And finally, we supported the technical support of parents on cultures maintenance" says Lova Andriantoa Rasoamaharo, FAO Field monitor.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
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4992 x 3323 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 8487.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Beabo Public school (Ambovombe), Androy region, 12 December 2018  WFP provides school meals with the support of the Ministry of National Education and is helping to develop a national school meals policy and a Home Grown School Meals programme (HGSF) linked to smallholder farmer production. As part of this programme, during the 2017/2018 school year, around 290,000 school children benefitted from daily hot meals, fortified with micronutrient powders in 1,100 primary public schools of southern Madagascar. In the south, school meals constitute a social security net for the most vulnerable households.   With the aim of linking small-holder farmer associations to school canteens, diversifying school meals, and providing income generating opportunities to small-holder farmers organizations, WFP launched a initiative, in collaboration with the Ministry of National Education, IFAD’s AROPA project and the FAO, in 20 targeted schools of Ambovombe district (Androy region, Southern Madagascar).  As part of this project, the 20 targeted schools benefit from life-skills education and trainings. Small-holder associations composed of children’s parents, cultivate vegetables on the school land using a micro irrigation system, plant fruit trees and possess small-scale livestock farms (chicken and goat). These activities enable them to supply school canteens with fresh and locally produced foods (partly sold and partly donated to schools), and sell part of their products in local markets for income generating purposes.  In the Photo: a view of the irrigation system put in place in the Beabo Public school as part of the Home Grown School Meals programme (HGSF).  "FAO contributed to this school garden by providing drop-to-drop irrigation kits. We also provided technical training on vegetable crops. And finally, we supported the technical support of parents on cultures maintenance" says Lova Andriantoa Rasoamaharo, FAO Field monitor.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
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3328 x 4992 px 28.18 x 42.27 cm 7756.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Beabo Public school (Ambovombe), Androy region, 12 December 2018  WFP provides school meals with the support of the Ministry of National Education and is helping to develop a national school meals policy and a Home Grown School Meals programme (HGSF) linked to smallholder farmer production. As part of this programme, during the 2017/2018 school year, around 290,000 school children benefitted from daily hot meals, fortified with micronutrient powders in 1,100 primary public schools of southern Madagascar. In the south, school meals constitute a social security net for the most vulnerable households.   With the aim of linking small-holder farmer associations to school canteens, diversifying school meals, and providing income generating opportunities to small-holder farmers organizations, WFP launched a initiative, in collaboration with the Ministry of National Education, IFAD’s AROPA project and the FAO, in 20 targeted schools of Ambovombe district (Androy region, Southern Madagascar).  As part of this project, the 20 targeted schools benefit from life-skills education and trainings. Small-holder associations composed of children’s parents, cultivate vegetables on the school land using a micro irrigation system, plant fruit trees and possess small-scale livestock farms (chicken and goat). These activities enable them to supply school canteens with fresh and locally produced foods (partly sold and partly donated to schools), and sell part of their products in local markets for income generating purposes.  In the Photo: a view of the irrigation system put in place in the Beabo Public school as part of the Home Grown School Meals programme (HGSF).  "FAO contributed to this school garden by providing drop-to-drop irrigation kits. We also provided technical training on vegetable crops. And finally, we supported the technical support of parents on cultures maintenance" says Lova Andriantoa Rasoamaharo, FAO Field monitor.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
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4992 x 3323 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 9441.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Beabo Public school (Ambovombe), Androy region, 12 December 2018  WFP provides school meals with the support of the Ministry of National Education and is helping to develop a national school meals policy and a Home Grown School Meals programme (HGSF) linked to smallholder farmer production. As part of this programme, during the 2017/2018 school year, around 290,000 school children benefitted from daily hot meals, fortified with micronutrient powders in 1,100 primary public schools of southern Madagascar. In the south, school meals constitute a social security net for the most vulnerable households.   With the aim of linking small-holder farmer associations to school canteens, diversifying school meals, and providing income generating opportunities to small-holder farmers organizations, WFP launched a initiative, in collaboration with the Ministry of National Education, IFAD’s AROPA project and the FAO, in 20 targeted schools of Ambovombe district (Androy region, Southern Madagascar).  As part of this project, the 20 targeted schools benefit from life-skills education and trainings. Small-holder associations composed of children’s parents, cultivate vegetables on the school land using a micro irrigation system, plant fruit trees and possess small-scale livestock farms (chicken and goat). These activities enable them to supply school canteens with fresh and locally produced foods (partly sold and partly donated to schools), and sell part of their products in local markets for income generating purposes.  In the Photo: Helton John Ratefinjanahary, IFAD/AROPA staff.  "IFAD gave Beabo drop-to-drop kits and seeds to improve children's meals at school, mainly with local productions. IFAD also supports goat and chicken breeding, which complements the green vegetables crops processed by the parents."  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
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4992 x 3328 px 42.27 x 28.18 cm 7374.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Beabo Public school (Ambovombe), Androy region, 12 December 2018  WFP provides school meals with the support of the Ministry of National Education and is helping to develop a national school meals policy and a Home Grown School Meals programme (HGSF) linked to smallholder farmer production. As part of this programme, during the 2017/2018 school year, around 290,000 school children benefitted from daily hot meals, fortified with micronutrient powders in 1,100 primary public schools of southern Madagascar. In the south, school meals constitute a social security net for the most vulnerable households.   With the aim of linking small-holder farmer associations to school canteens, diversifying school meals, and providing income generating opportunities to small-holder farmers organizations, WFP launched a initiative, in collaboration with the Ministry of National Education, IFAD’s AROPA project and the FAO, in 20 targeted schools of Ambovombe district (Androy region, Southern Madagascar).  As part of this project, the 20 targeted schools benefit from life-skills education and trainings. Small-holder associations composed of children’s parents, cultivate vegetables on the school land using a micro irrigation system, plant fruit trees and possess small-scale livestock farms (chicken and goat). These activities enable them to supply school canteens with fresh and locally produced foods (partly sold and partly donated to schools), and sell part of their products in local markets for income generating purposes.  In the Photo: Helton John Ratefinjanahary, IFAD/AROPA staff.  "IFAD gave Beabo drop-to-drop kits and seeds to improve children's meals at school, mainly with local productions. IFAD also supports goat and chicken breeding, which complements the green vegetables crops processed by the parents."  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
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3292 x 4992 px 10.97 x 16.64 cm 6436.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Beabo Public school (Ambovombe), Androy region, 12 December 2018  WFP provides school meals with the support of the Ministry of National Education and is helping to develop a national school meals policy and a Home Grown School Meals programme (HGSF) linked to smallholder farmer production. As part of this programme, during the 2017/2018 school year, around 290,000 school children benefitted from daily hot meals, fortified with micronutrient powders in 1,100 primary public schools of southern Madagascar. In the south, school meals constitute a social security net for the most vulnerable households.   With the aim of linking small-holder farmer associations to school canteens, diversifying school meals, and providing income generating opportunities to small-holder farmers organizations, WFP launched a initiative, in collaboration with the Ministry of National Education, IFAD’s AROPA project and the FAO, in 20 targeted schools of Ambovombe district (Androy region, Southern Madagascar).  As part of this project, the 20 targeted schools benefit from life-skills education and trainings. Small-holder associations composed of children’s parents, cultivate vegetables on the school land using a micro irrigation system, plant fruit trees and possess small-scale livestock farms (chicken and goat). These activities enable them to supply school canteens with fresh and locally produced foods (partly sold and partly donated to schools), and sell part of their products in local markets for income generating purposes.  In the Photo: Lova Andriantoa Rasoamaharo, FAO Field monitor   "FAO contributed to this school garden by providing drop-to-drop irrigation kits. We also provided technical training on vegetable crops. And finally, we supported the technical support of parents on cultures maintenance."  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
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4992 x 3322 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 6397.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Beabo Public school (Ambovombe), Androy region, 12 December 2018  WFP provides school meals with the support of the Ministry of National Education and is helping to develop a national school meals policy and a Home Grown School Meals programme (HGSF) linked to smallholder farmer production. As part of this programme, during the 2017/2018 school year, around 290,000 school children benefitted from daily hot meals, fortified with micronutrient powders in 1,100 primary public schools of southern Madagascar. In the south, school meals constitute a social security net for the most vulnerable households.   With the aim of linking small-holder farmer associations to school canteens, diversifying school meals, and providing income generating opportunities to small-holder farmers organizations, WFP launched a initiative, in collaboration with the Ministry of National Education, IFAD’s AROPA project and the FAO, in 20 targeted schools of Ambovombe district (Androy region, Southern Madagascar).  As part of this project, the 20 targeted schools benefit from life-skills education and trainings. Small-holder associations composed of children’s parents, cultivate vegetables on the school land using a micro irrigation system, plant fruit trees and possess small-scale livestock farms (chicken and goat). These activities enable them to supply school canteens with fresh and locally produced foods (partly sold and partly donated to schools), and sell part of their products in local markets for income generating purposes.  In the Photo: Lova Andriantoa Rasoamaharo, FAO Field monitor   "FAO contributed to this school garden by providing drop-to-drop irrigation kits. We also provided technical training on vegetable crops. And finally, we supported the technical support of parents on cultures maintenance."  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
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3328 x 4992 px 28.18 x 42.27 cm 6206.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Beabo Public school (Ambovombe), Androy region, 12 December 2018  WFP provides school meals with the support of the Ministry of National Education and is helping to develop a national school meals policy and a Home Grown School Meals programme (HGSF) linked to smallholder farmer production. As part of this programme, during the 2017/2018 school year, around 290,000 school children benefitted from daily hot meals, fortified with micronutrient powders in 1,100 primary public schools of southern Madagascar. In the south, school meals constitute a social security net for the most vulnerable households.   With the aim of linking small-holder farmer associations to school canteens, diversifying school meals, and providing income generating opportunities to small-holder farmers organizations, WFP launched a initiative, in collaboration with the Ministry of National Education, IFAD’s AROPA project and the FAO, in 20 targeted schools of Ambovombe district (Androy region, Southern Madagascar).  As part of this project, the 20 targeted schools benefit from life-skills education and trainings. Small-holder associations composed of children’s parents, cultivate vegetables on the school land using a micro irrigation system, plant fruit trees and possess small-scale livestock farms (chicken and goat). These activities enable them to supply school canteens with fresh and locally produced foods (partly sold and partly donated to schools), and sell part of their products in local markets for income generating purposes.  In the Photo: Blandine Legonou Fanou, Head of WFP Ambovombe Field Office and WFP School Feeding Officer.  "In Madagascar, we opted to work in partnership with all UN agencies and beyond, with the Government to ensure ownership, sustainability of interventions and really resilience. We are working together on this product called cassava which is produced in huge quantities in Madagascar, but which is only consumed fresh. As a result, we have started a programme to use this cassava so that it can be processed and used in a more sustainable way for two or three years. Thus, together with FAO, IFAD and UNICEF, we have started such a programme for zero hunger which is our goal by 2030, to change lives, so that everyone can ensure his own food and send his children to school."  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
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4992 x 3328 px 42.27 x 28.18 cm 6749.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Beabo Public school (Ambovombe), Androy region, 12 December 2018  WFP provides school meals with the support of the Ministry of National Education and is helping to develop a national school meals policy and a Home Grown School Meals programme (HGSF) linked to smallholder farmer production. As part of this programme, during the 2017/2018 school year, around 290,000 school children benefitted from daily hot meals, fortified with micronutrient powders in 1,100 primary public schools of southern Madagascar. In the south, school meals constitute a social security net for the most vulnerable households.   With the aim of linking small-holder farmer associations to school canteens, diversifying school meals, and providing income generating opportunities to small-holder farmers organizations, WFP launched a initiative, in collaboration with the Ministry of National Education, IFAD’s AROPA project and the FAO, in 20 targeted schools of Ambovombe district (Androy region, Southern Madagascar).  As part of this project, the 20 targeted schools benefit from life-skills education and trainings. Small-holder associations composed of children’s parents, cultivate vegetables on the school land using a micro irrigation system, plant fruit trees and possess small-scale livestock farms (chicken and goat). These activities enable them to supply school canteens with fresh and locally produced foods (partly sold and partly donated to schools), and sell part of their products in local markets for income generating purposes.  In the Photo: Blandine Legonou Fanou, Head of WFP Ambovombe Field Office and WFP School Feeding Officer.  "In Madagascar, we opted to work in partnership with all UN agencies and beyond, with the Government to ensure ownership, sustainability of interventions and really resilience. We are working together on this product called cassava which is produced in huge quantities in Madagascar, but which is only consumed fresh. As a result, we have started a programme to use this cassava so that it can be processed and used in a more sustainable way for two or three years. Thus, together with FAO, IFAD and UNICEF, we have started such a programme for zero hunger which is our goal by 2030, to change lives, so that everyone can ensure his own food and send his children to school."  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
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4992 x 3322 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 6131.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Beabo Public school (Ambovombe), Androy region, 12 December 2018  WFP provides school meals with the support of the Ministry of National Education and is helping to develop a national school meals policy and a Home Grown School Meals programme (HGSF) linked to smallholder farmer production. As part of this programme, during the 2017/2018 school year, around 290,000 school children benefitted from daily hot meals, fortified with micronutrient powders in 1,100 primary public schools of southern Madagascar. In the south, school meals constitute a social security net for the most vulnerable households.   With the aim of linking small-holder farmer associations to school canteens, diversifying school meals, and providing income generating opportunities to small-holder farmers organizations, WFP launched a initiative, in collaboration with the Ministry of National Education, IFAD’s AROPA project and the FAO, in 20 targeted schools of Ambovombe district (Androy region, Southern Madagascar).  As part of this project, the 20 targeted schools benefit from life-skills education and trainings. Small-holder associations composed of children’s parents, cultivate vegetables on the school land using a micro irrigation system, plant fruit trees and possess small-scale livestock farms (chicken and goat). These activities enable them to supply school canteens with fresh and locally produced foods (partly sold and partly donated to schools), and sell part of their products in local markets for income generating purposes.  In the Photo: Blandine Legonou Fanou, Head of WFP Ambovombe Field Office and WFP School Feeding Officer.  "In Madagascar, we opted to work in partnership with all UN agencies and beyond, with the Government to ensure ownership, sustainability of interventions and really resilience. We are working together on this product called cassava which is produced in huge quantities in Madagascar, but which is only consumed fresh. As a result, we have started a programme to use this cassava so that it can be processed and used in a more sustainable way for two or three years. Thus, together with FAO, IFAD and UNICEF, we have started such a programme for zero hunger which is our goal by 2030, to change lives, so that everyone can ensure his own food and send his children to school."  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
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Madagascar, Beabo Public school (Ambovombe), Androy region, 12 December 2018  WFP provides school meals with the support of the Ministry of National Education and is helping to develop a national school meals policy and a Home Grown School Meals programme (HGSF) linked to smallholder farmer production. As part of this programme, during the 2017/2018 school year, around 290,000 school children benefitted from daily hot meals, fortified with micronutrient powders in 1,100 primary public schools of southern Madagascar. In the south, school meals constitute a social security net for the most vulnerable households.   With the aim of linking small-holder farmer associations to school canteens, diversifying school meals, and providing income generating opportunities to small-holder farmers organizations, WFP launched a initiative, in collaboration with the Ministry of National Education, IFAD’s AROPA project and the FAO, in 20 targeted schools of Ambovombe district (Androy region, Southern Madagascar).  As part of this project, the 20 targeted schools benefit from life-skills education and trainings. Small-holder associations composed of children’s parents, cultivate vegetables on the school land using a micro irrigation system, plant fruit trees and possess small-scale livestock farms (chicken and goat). These activities enable them to supply school canteens with fresh and locally produced foods (partly sold and partly donated to schools), and sell part of their products in local markets for income generating purposes.  In the Photo: Blandine Legonou Fanou, Head of WFP Ambovombe Field Office and WFP School Feeding Officer.  "In Madagascar, we opted to work in partnership with all UN agencies and beyond, with the Government to ensure ownership, sustainability of interventions and really resilience. We are working together on this product called cassava which is produced in huge quantities in Madagascar, but which is only consumed fresh. As a result, we have started a programme to use this cassava so that it can be processed and used in a more sustainable way for two or three years. Thus, together with FAO, IFAD and UNICEF, we have started such a programme for zero hunger which is our goal by 2030, to change lives, so that everyone can ensure his own food and send his children to school."  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
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4992 x 3328 px 42.27 x 28.18 cm 5883.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Beabo Public school (Ambovombe), Androy region, 12 December 2018  WFP provides school meals with the support of the Ministry of National Education and is helping to develop a national school meals policy and a Home Grown School Meals programme (HGSF) linked to smallholder farmer production. As part of this programme, during the 2017/2018 school year, around 290,000 school children benefitted from daily hot meals, fortified with micronutrient powders in 1,100 primary public schools of southern Madagascar. In the south, school meals constitute a social security net for the most vulnerable households.   With the aim of linking small-holder farmer associations to school canteens, diversifying school meals, and providing income generating opportunities to small-holder farmers organizations, WFP launched a initiative, in collaboration with the Ministry of National Education, IFAD’s AROPA project and the FAO, in 20 targeted schools of Ambovombe district (Androy region, Southern Madagascar).  As part of this project, the 20 targeted schools benefit from life-skills education and trainings. Small-holder associations composed of children’s parents, cultivate vegetables on the school land using a micro irrigation system, plant fruit trees and possess small-scale livestock farms (chicken and goat). These activities enable them to supply school canteens with fresh and locally produced foods (partly sold and partly donated to schools), and sell part of their products in local markets for income generating purposes.  In the Photo: school children gathering outside their classroom at the Beabo Public school (Ambovombe).  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
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Madagascar, Beabo Public school (Ambovombe), Androy region, 12 December 2018  WFP provides school meals with the support of the Ministry of National Education and is helping to develop a national school meals policy and a Home Grown School Meals programme (HGSF) linked to smallholder farmer production. As part of this programme, during the 2017/2018 school year, around 290,000 school children benefitted from daily hot meals, fortified with micronutrient powders in 1,100 primary public schools of southern Madagascar. In the south, school meals constitute a social security net for the most vulnerable households.   With the aim of linking small-holder farmer associations to school canteens, diversifying school meals, and providing income generating opportunities to small-holder farmers organizations, WFP launched a initiative, in collaboration with the Ministry of National Education, IFAD’s AROPA project and the FAO, in 20 targeted schools of Ambovombe district (Androy region, Southern Madagascar).  As part of this project, the 20 targeted schools benefit from life-skills education and trainings. Small-holder associations composed of children’s parents, cultivate vegetables on the school land using a micro irrigation system, plant fruit trees and possess small-scale livestock farms (chicken and goat). These activities enable them to supply school canteens with fresh and locally produced foods (partly sold and partly donated to schools), and sell part of their products in local markets for income generating purposes.  In the Photo: school children gathering outside their classroom at the Beabo Public school (Ambovombe).  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
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4992 x 3323 px 42.27 x 28.13 cm 8236.00 kb
 
Madagascar, Beabo Public school (Ambovombe), Androy region, 12 December 2018  WFP provides school meals with the support of the Ministry of National Education and is helping to develop a national school meals policy and a Home Grown School Meals programme (HGSF) linked to smallholder farmer production. As part of this programme, during the 2017/2018 school year, around 290,000 school children benefitted from daily hot meals, fortified with micronutrient powders in 1,100 primary public schools of southern Madagascar. In the south, school meals constitute a social security net for the most vulnerable households.   With the aim of linking small-holder farmer associations to school canteens, diversifying school meals, and providing income generating opportunities to small-holder farmers organizations, WFP launched a initiative, in collaboration with the Ministry of National Education, IFAD’s AROPA project and the FAO, in 20 targeted schools of Ambovombe district (Androy region, Southern Madagascar).  As part of this project, the 20 targeted schools benefit from life-skills education and trainings. Small-holder associations composed of children’s parents, cultivate vegetables on the school land using a micro irrigation system, plant fruit trees and possess small-scale livestock farms (chicken and goat). These activities enable them to supply school canteens with fresh and locally produced foods (partly sold and partly donated to schools), and sell part of their products in local markets for income generating purposes.  In the Photo: school children gathering outside their classroom at the Beabo Public school (Ambovombe).  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
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Madagascar, Beabo Public school (Ambovombe), Androy region, 12 December 2018  WFP provides school meals with the support of the Ministry of National Education and is helping to develop a national school meals policy and a Home Grown School Meals programme (HGSF) linked to smallholder farmer production. As part of this programme, during the 2017/2018 school year, around 290,000 school children benefitted from daily hot meals, fortified with micronutrient powders in 1,100 primary public schools of southern Madagascar. In the south, school meals constitute a social security net for the most vulnerable households.   With the aim of linking small-holder farmer associations to school canteens, diversifying school meals, and providing income generating opportunities to small-holder farmers organizations, WFP launched a initiative, in collaboration with the Ministry of National Education, IFAD’s AROPA project and the FAO, in 20 targeted schools of Ambovombe district (Androy region, Southern Madagascar).  As part of this project, the 20 targeted schools benefit from life-skills education and trainings. Small-holder associations composed of children’s parents, cultivate vegetables on the school land using a micro irrigation system, plant fruit trees and possess small-scale livestock farms (chicken and goat). These activities enable them to supply school canteens with fresh and locally produced foods (partly sold and partly donated to schools), and sell part of their products in local markets for income generating purposes.  In the Photo: school children gathering outside their classroom at the Beabo Public school (Ambovombe).  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
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Madagascar, Beabo Public school (Ambovombe), Androy region, 12 December 2018  WFP provides school meals with the support of the Ministry of National Education and is helping to develop a national school meals policy and a Home Grown School Meals programme (HGSF) linked to smallholder farmer production. As part of this programme, during the 2017/2018 school year, around 290,000 school children benefitted from daily hot meals, fortified with micronutrient powders in 1,100 primary public schools of southern Madagascar. In the south, school meals constitute a social security net for the most vulnerable households.   With the aim of linking small-holder farmer associations to school canteens, diversifying school meals, and providing income generating opportunities to small-holder farmers organizations, WFP launched a initiative, in collaboration with the Ministry of National Education, IFAD’s AROPA project and the FAO, in 20 targeted schools of Ambovombe district (Androy region, Southern Madagascar).  As part of this project, the 20 targeted schools benefit from life-skills education and trainings. Small-holder associations composed of children’s parents, cultivate vegetables on the school land using a micro irrigation system, plant fruit trees and possess small-scale livestock farms (chicken and goat). These activities enable them to supply school canteens with fresh and locally produced foods (partly sold and partly donated to schools), and sell part of their products in local markets for income generating purposes.  In the Photo: school children gathering outside their classroom at the Beabo Public school (Ambovombe).  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
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Madagascar, Beabo Public school (Ambovombe), Androy region, 12 December 2018  WFP provides school meals with the support of the Ministry of National Education and is helping to develop a national school meals policy and a home-grown school meals programme linked to smallholder farmer production. As part of this programme, during the 2017/2018 school year, around 290,000 school children benefitted from daily hot meals, fortified with micronutrient powders in 1,100 primary public schools of southern Madagascar. In the south, school meals constitute a social security net for the most vulnerable households.   In the Photo: the Beabo Public school (Ambovombe).  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
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Madagascar, Beabo Public school (Ambovombe), Androy region, 12 December 2018  WFP provides school meals with the support of the Ministry of National Education and is helping to develop a national school meals policy and a home-grown school meals programme linked to smallholder farmer production. As part of this programme, during the 2017/2018 school year, around 290,000 school children benefitted from daily hot meals, fortified with micronutrient powders in 1,100 primary public schools of southern Madagascar. In the south, school meals constitute a social security net for the most vulnerable households.   With the aim of linking small-holder farmer associations to school canteens, diversifying school meals, and providing income generating opportunities to small-holder farmers organizations, WFP launched a initiative, in collaboration with the Ministry of National Education, IFAD’s AROPA project and the FAO, in 20 targeted schools of Ambovombe district (Androy region, Southern Madagascar).  As part of this project, the 20 targeted schools benefit from life-skills education and trainings. Small-holder associations composed of children’s parents, cultivate vegetables on the school land using a micro irrigation system, plant fruit trees and possess small-scale livestock farms (chicken and goat). These activities enable them to supply school canteens with fresh and locally produced foods (partly sold and partly donated to schools), and sell part of their products in local markets for income generating purposes.  In the Photo: school children having their meal at the Beabo Public school (Ambovombe). The vegetables and the kassava cake are prepared thanks to the Home grown school feeding.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
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Madagascar, Beabo Public school (Ambovombe), Androy region, 12 December 2018  WFP provides school meals with the support of the Ministry of National Education and is helping to develop a national school meals policy and a home-grown school meals programme linked to smallholder farmer production. As part of this programme, during the 2017/2018 school year, around 290,000 school children benefitted from daily hot meals, fortified with micronutrient powders in 1,100 primary public schools of southern Madagascar. In the south, school meals constitute a social security net for the most vulnerable households.   With the aim of linking small-holder farmer associations to school canteens, diversifying school meals, and providing income generating opportunities to small-holder farmers organizations, WFP launched a initiative, in collaboration with the Ministry of National Education, IFAD’s AROPA project and the FAO, in 20 targeted schools of Ambovombe district (Androy region, Southern Madagascar).  As part of this project, the 20 targeted schools benefit from life-skills education and trainings. Small-holder associations composed of children’s parents, cultivate vegetables on the school land using a micro irrigation system, plant fruit trees and possess small-scale livestock farms (chicken and goat). These activities enable them to supply school canteens with fresh and locally produced foods (partly sold and partly donated to schools), and sell part of their products in local markets for income generating purposes.  In the Photo: school children having their meal at the Beabo Public school (Ambovombe). The vegetables and the kassava cake are prepared thanks to the Home grown school feeding.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
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Madagascar, Beabo Public school (Ambovombe), Androy region, 12 December 2018  WFP provides school meals with the support of the Ministry of National Education and is helping to develop a national school meals policy and a home-grown school meals programme linked to smallholder farmer production. As part of this programme, during the 2017/2018 school year, around 290,000 school children benefitted from daily hot meals, fortified with micronutrient powders in 1,100 primary public schools of southern Madagascar. In the south, school meals constitute a social security net for the most vulnerable households.   With the aim of linking small-holder farmer associations to school canteens, diversifying school meals, and providing income generating opportunities to small-holder farmers organizations, WFP launched a initiative, in collaboration with the Ministry of National Education, IFAD’s AROPA project and the FAO, in 20 targeted schools of Ambovombe district (Androy region, Southern Madagascar).  As part of this project, the 20 targeted schools benefit from life-skills education and trainings. Small-holder associations composed of children’s parents, cultivate vegetables on the school land using a micro irrigation system, plant fruit trees and possess small-scale livestock farms (chicken and goat). These activities enable them to supply school canteens with fresh and locally produced foods (partly sold and partly donated to schools), and sell part of their products in local markets for income generating purposes.  In the Photo: a woman serving the meal at the Beabo Public school (Ambovombe). The Kassava cake is prepared thanks to the Home grown school feeding.  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
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Madagascar, Beabo Public school (Ambovombe), Androy region, 12 December 2018  WFP provides school meals with the support of the Ministry of National Education and is helping to develop a national school meals policy and a Home Grown School Meals programme (HGSF) linked to smallholder farmer production. As part of this programme, during the 2017/2018 school year, around 290,000 school children benefitted from daily hot meals, fortified with micronutrient powders in 1,100 primary public schools of southern Madagascar. In the south, school meals constitute a social security net for the most vulnerable households.   With the aim of linking small-holder farmer associations to school canteens, diversifying school meals, and providing income generating opportunities to small-holder farmers organizations, WFP launched a initiative, in collaboration with the Ministry of National Education, IFAD’s AROPA project and the FAO, in 20 targeted schools of Ambovombe district (Androy region, Southern Madagascar).  As part of this project, the 20 targeted schools benefit from life-skills education and trainings. Small-holder associations composed of children’s parents, cultivate vegetables on the school land using a micro irrigation system, plant fruit trees and possess small-scale livestock farms (chicken and goat). These activities enable them to supply school canteens with fresh and locally produced foods (partly sold and partly donated to schools), and sell part of their products in local markets for income generating purposes.  In the Photo: a woman serving the cassava cake as part of the meal at the Beabo Public school (Ambovombe). The vegetables and the cassava are cultivated within the school thanks to the Home Grown School Feeding programme (HGSF).  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
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Madagascar, Beabo Public school (Ambovombe), Androy region, 12 December 2018  WFP provides school meals with the support of the Ministry of National Education and is helping to develop a national school meals policy and a Home Grown School Meals programme (HGSF) linked to smallholder farmer production. As part of this programme, during the 2017/2018 school year, around 290,000 school children benefitted from daily hot meals, fortified with micronutrient powders in 1,100 primary public schools of southern Madagascar. In the south, school meals constitute a social security net for the most vulnerable households.   With the aim of linking small-holder farmer associations to school canteens, diversifying school meals, and providing income generating opportunities to small-holder farmers organizations, WFP launched a initiative, in collaboration with the Ministry of National Education, IFAD’s AROPA project and the FAO, in 20 targeted schools of Ambovombe district (Androy region, Southern Madagascar).  As part of this project, the 20 targeted schools benefit from life-skills education and trainings. Small-holder associations composed of children’s parents, cultivate vegetables on the school land using a micro irrigation system, plant fruit trees and possess small-scale livestock farms (chicken and goat). These activities enable them to supply school canteens with fresh and locally produced foods (partly sold and partly donated to schools), and sell part of their products in local markets for income generating purposes.  In the Photo: a woman serving the cassava cake as part of the meal at the Beabo Public school (Ambovombe). The vegetables and the cassava are cultivated within the school thanks to the Home Grown School Feeding programme (HGSF).  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
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Madagascar, Beabo Public school (Ambovombe), Androy region, 12 December 2018  WFP provides school meals with the support of the Ministry of National Education and is helping to develop a national school meals policy and a Home Grown School Meals programme (HGSF) linked to smallholder farmer production. As part of this programme, during the 2017/2018 school year, around 290,000 school children benefitted from daily hot meals, fortified with micronutrient powders in 1,100 primary public schools of southern Madagascar. In the south, school meals constitute a social security net for the most vulnerable households.   With the aim of linking small-holder farmer associations to school canteens, diversifying school meals, and providing income generating opportunities to small-holder farmers organizations, WFP launched a initiative, in collaboration with the Ministry of National Education, IFAD’s AROPA project and the FAO, in 20 targeted schools of Ambovombe district (Androy region, Southern Madagascar).  As part of this project, the 20 targeted schools benefit from life-skills education and trainings. Small-holder associations composed of children’s parents, cultivate vegetables on the school land using a micro irrigation system, plant fruit trees and possess small-scale livestock farms (chicken and goat). These activities enable them to supply school canteens with fresh and locally produced foods (partly sold and partly donated to schools), and sell part of their products in local markets for income generating purposes.  In the Photo: a woman serving the cassava cake as part of the meal at the Beabo Public school (Ambovombe). The vegetables and the cassava are cultivated within the school thanks to the Home Grown School Feeding programme (HGSF).  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
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Madagascar, Beabo Public school (Ambovombe), Androy region, 12 December 2018  WFP provides school meals with the support of the Ministry of National Education and is helping to develop a national school meals policy and a Home Grown School Meals programme (HGSF) linked to smallholder farmer production. As part of this programme, during the 2017/2018 school year, around 290,000 school children benefitted from daily hot meals, fortified with micronutrient powders in 1,100 primary public schools of southern Madagascar. In the south, school meals constitute a social security net for the most vulnerable households.   With the aim of linking small-holder farmer associations to school canteens, diversifying school meals, and providing income generating opportunities to small-holder farmers organizations, WFP launched a initiative, in collaboration with the Ministry of National Education, IFAD’s AROPA project and the FAO, in 20 targeted schools of Ambovombe district (Androy region, Southern Madagascar).  As part of this project, the 20 targeted schools benefit from life-skills education and trainings. Small-holder associations composed of children’s parents, cultivate vegetables on the school land using a micro irrigation system, plant fruit trees and possess small-scale livestock farms (chicken and goat). These activities enable them to supply school canteens with fresh and locally produced foods (partly sold and partly donated to schools), and sell part of their products in local markets for income generating purposes.  In the Photo: a woman serving the cassava cake as part of the meal at the Beabo Public school (Ambovombe). The vegetables and the cassava are cultivated within the school thanks to the Home Grown School Feeding programme (HGSF).  Photo: WFP/Giulio d'Adamo
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